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A REVOLUTION IN MINING.

We have been favored with the following appreciative description of the Tamaiti Sluicing Co.'s claim and plant from Mr John E. Keeuan, of Tuapeka Mouth ;—; — For many years it has been known that the terraces on both sides of the Tuapeka River are of a highly auriferous nature, but, owing to the enormous difficulties to be faced in bringing them under the command of an adequate water supply, no systematic effort has ever been made to work them In favorable positions, however, some mining on primitive methods has from time to time been carried on, but for some years even this system of mining | h<is been abaadonecl owing Co the enormous labor entailed. Some time ago Messrs W. Hogg and A. N. Wakenled, of Lawrence, secured a large area of the land referred to and also the right to erect a dam across the Tuapeka River. Having obtained these rights, they worked assiduously on an idea of which they (and not Mr R. M'lnto&h, assistant Inspector of Mines, as stated in the New Zealand Mines Record) are the originators. A private company was formed for the purpose of providing the capital, and Mr A. N. Wakefield, whose resourcefulness and ingenuity in mining matters are "vvell known, was appointed nianapjer, and "he quickly got to work in carrying out the ideas on which it was proposed to work the claim, and he now has the satisfaction of seeing his work — the first of the kind in the Southern Hemisphere — carried to a successful issue. The company is known by the euphonious Maori appellation The Tamaiti Sluicing Company, and its claim I is situated on the banks of the Tuapeka River about nine miles froni Lawrence. i The system by winch it is going to be worked is, now that it has been demonstrated, ridiculously simple, and the wonder is that it had not been adopted years ago. The water of the river, having been raised to the height of 30ft by means of the dam, it is concentrated by means of a fluming to work a turbine, which, in turn, generates the power for working the pumps to lift the water on to the terrace. The dam is built on the crib principle, that is the framework is constructed of logs placed in such a position as to form squares, which were then filled with rock and debris. The logs are all firmly bolted together, &n&, when it is mentioned tli&fc no fewer than 400 logs 15 to 40 feet in length and of an average diameter of 2ft were used in its construction, some faint idea may be formed of its formidable proportions. The width of the dam at the base is 38ft and at the top 12ft. The height of the dam is 30ft. A flume capable of carrying 70 cubic feet ot water has been built in at a height of 25ft. This conveys the water on to the 26in Samson single discharge horizontal turbine made by the James Leffel Company, Ohio, U.S.A. Messrs Robison Bros., Melbourne, had a contract to supply the pumps but failed to do so, and the company had to have them manufactured m Duneoin by Messrs A. and T. Burt, who carried out their manufacture under the supervision of Mr R. Murie and Mr A. N. Wakefield. There are four Tangey pumps connected in a series on one shaft mounted on.a dredge ladder. They are at present throwing 6J heads of water to a height of 200 ft, with the turbine only at half-gate. The powerhouse and claim is lighted with an 800candle power electric light, the generator being Westinghouse make. There are at present about 600 ft of pipes on the claim. The cost of the dam, which took about 10 months to construct, with between 15 and 20 men employed, was £1,300. The capital of the company is £3,000. The work of this Gompany is looked upon by all miners as being of material benefit in the development of the mining industry in the colony, as in places where the conditions are similar it dispenses with long races. The system of raising the water is equally serviceable for irrigation purposes, and I have no doubt that the Government oliicials will be prompt to make a note of its advantages for that purpose. Mr Highly is the claim manager. It is to be hoped the enterprising shareholders will be re>varded for their pluck. The works will, I understand, be formally opened on the 9th November.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TT19061010.2.13

Bibliographic details

A REVOLUTION IN MINING., Tuapeka Times, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 5407, 10 October 1906

Word Count
757

A REVOLUTION IN MINING. Tuapeka Times, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 5407, 10 October 1906

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