Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

EXTRAORDINARY DERBY.

INCIDENTS OF THE RACE

THRILLS ALL THROUGH. — , .. i i No Derby was _so rujh m Rpnsn.t,inns J apart from the fanatical attempt by a suffragette to stop the KingV horse and the disqualification >of the faA T orite (says the London, correspondent of~t>he 'Sydney ' Daily Telegraph, whose story of the race « was telegraphed' from Perth on arrival of the. mail steamer); pThe race was, m itself, a remarkable one. Four horses finished practically m a straight line, and lengths behind came another j, thijee,. which also ran almost a dead i he^t. ; Photographs of the • finish look : mo^relike ofthe start for a race than a finish. , The attempt' by Miss Davison, a notofrioius suffragette, is: described by an eyewitness : "Miss JJavison, who was standing close to. the rails, a. few yards from me, suddenly 'ducked.', under. l,he sailings as .the horses came up. This was near Tattehhanv Corner, and there avhs a very large crQwd of . people on : both sides of the i .course at. this point. Miss Davison and I were, ph .the side, close to Avhich thq horses run, and, I could see plainly all that was happening. The horses had turned, the corner, and were- approaching the Avinning post. There was a furious silence, like the .hush that generally falls on 'a. crowd at a moment of great tension. Then I heard a Avomari say ; 'What's she doing ?' and I saw Miss Davison run out .on, to. the,. course. I think. that three or four horses had gone by when she , ran j out. The King s horse, Armer, . came up, and Miss Davison" went towards! it. She put up her hand, but vvhether.it was to catch hold of the reins or to protect herself I do not know. It ,was all over m a few seconds. The horse, knocked the Avoman over with great force, j and then stumbled and fell, pitching the jockey violently onto the ground. JJoth the jockey and Miss Davison were bleeding profusely. I feel sure that Miss Davison meant to stop the horse, and that she did' not go on the course m the belief that the race Avas over, for I saAv that only a few of the horses had gone by when I savv her leave the railing, and the others had not passed Avheh she was knocked down. I coidd not see whether any of the other horses touched : her, for the whole tiling .happened so quickly."

HOTTEST OF THE. HOT-BLOODS, Miss, Davison is described as the hottest of all suffragette, "hotr.blqods." She was 35 years of age, and a Bachelor of Arts of the . London University. '*' She Ay-as a militant since 1905. She has three times. hid, herself m the House, of; Commons and once m, ah air-shaft. .. She was nine times m prison, and: three times gained her freedom by "hunger-strik-ing." She set .fire to pillar-boxes. Once she barricaded herself m a prison cell, and the warders had to play a fire hose , upon her : before they could get at her. On another occasion, Avhile m prisonj she attempted to commit suicide by throwing herself downstairs asa protest against forcible feeding. Another x>f her sensational; performances was io'strike a Baptist minister, whom she mistook; for Mi* IJoyd,.,Georg€|. „ ; • -;•-., . ,> i The sporting writer for the Daily Mail gives the following account of the race and ; incidents which led- to the disqualification'of the. favorite z^-t 1 - r r-T'.', ' . It Ayas so, far from loeing a fair, race that tlie stewards disqualified. Craganpur for unfair tactics on the^ pai?t of his jockey. It was "so'far ' from being won by ; the jbesti horse that two others Tri lifferent circumstances would, have finished m front. These were Louvois and Shpgun, and I may as well express oifiand my settled conviction that Shpgun would, have scored for Mr, Hul^on <b.ut for 1 being,' terribly interfered "with m ihe lasjfc quarter of a mile. His jockey, Frank 'Wootton, vvas twice obliged practically to pull him up. SHOGUN'S BAD LUCK. Horses .before * Shogun .have . .been tin; fortunate m the Derby, ; but never avus jne which so palpably 'owed, his defeat i 6 'bad luck. \ MrHulton,/who had, supported his colt to win a large stake, nust have "felt his disappointment ke6ny m spite, of .his .remark, after the race, >hat. "it needs a, lot of luck to Avin the * Derby." He said "luck," and. the Variety served outr'to him,' m the. tjeijby j was vexatious and irritating to the. last! iegree. ..-..•■., „ ■ :'•.: -.>* j It Avas a; "jiynp", start, and catightvpne,. >r two jockeys by surprised Oragahbur, s like .a' streak of lightning off the. nark, and- John Reiff got him away | juickly, : -but immediately took a pull !, vt him, and allowed Aldegond© and Aboyeur to head him. Aboyeur's jockey nuckly dashed him to the fore,' and this sensational 100 "to 1 chance was never jut of the' picture afterwards. He led ~*iaganour over the crest of the hill ? md pelted ahead down to Tattenham j I'orner. They came tearing . up the straight, and still Aboyeur was leading j :he Avay. packers of the favorites look- j >d on apprehensively. ■■» ■ ! Was this "rotten brute" .going to do hq Jeddah, and >Signorinetta trick, by Dringing 'off a (0.00 ,to Reliance,?,. ;>lt ooked perilously like it, even a quarter )f & mile.from heme. • • , .-• ''■ Just about then, commenced; the regret- . iable incidents \vhicK hail "such.' a senyxtional and stiipefying upshot. . I Wootton brought, Shogun, up on the, rails. This is .-the position. 7 xheloved of j the famous jockey, and he will never j 50 anywhere else -if he ; cap help it. \|te j has manoeuvred for position, and thereby lost,. races which other tactics Avould uave won. , SimUarly. he,, has,-, won v races by going t)iere',w*hicH otherwise wbuld have been- tost. Remembering his atr tachment to the position, people blamed him tor 1 going {here m the Derby; But m tliis case, at any rate, their censutres were unmerited^ fpr -thexfir.was. A'oom for a. cart betAveen Aboyeur and the rails. ; A BUMPING FINISH. I Shogun: avAs' just beginning his great effort. His Spends had expected him to begin it exactly where, he. did., , Not particularly .fast fr' #c. ea>ly . stagey of the race, Shogun I possesse§ fihe statfiina, and' has' the courage of. the bulldcg. "It's all over," .saSdan enthusiast, Avhen Shogun appeared' on the • rails* inside AhoyeM*/ full of running himself,, and having only twft<#lre*dy^troub.led. horses toibeat m the.run home. The race looked "all, over.'.'' "?:';''■ . 'V" ' "^ • I. Suddenly there was a commotion. Craganour bumped' against Aboyeur, who swerved .towards the rajls anj; cut off Shogun. "Ml* Wootton 'screamed' but to his jockey, "What are you doing?;'. "1 can't help itr' 'the other rfder screamed back. "It's the. otjher horse!" • ■'"■■ Another htwidred, yards down Woqtton grabbed at the chance to come through, on tlhe' inside' of Aboyeur,, but.. with ''the same result; he Avas^ shut : off again, to all! appearances, indirectly through. Craganour. 1 This settled Shogun. - MeanwhUe Louvois, Avho had been -baulked below the AVa^'cdming tip, and the- French oolt Nimbus Avas handy, while Great ., Sport began to take ~& : - 'bawl m the ' business. But the;, engrossing feature was the battle between Craganour and Aboyeur. They bumped and bumped. Craganour seemed to derive greater stimulus from 1 these happenings. Within a few yards of the judge-ho did an extraordinary thing, .Craganour appeared to be completely off the ground,' making what a. can only describe as a flying leap on. Aboyeur, and so ended the sensational. race. ■-\ -..■ r> >.■■■• -.f ■■'••!■ ■' ■ „, .DISQUALIFIED, , :.,., . Craganour got thp verdict by . a- anP Tt head, Avith Louvois 1 third, a neck away,, just m front of Great Sport and Nimbus. The other^r were .-.not, far behind, and it must„be, ages • sipce, .suqh, a..\arge , num,li.er of Der,by runners finished^ so close to each other. , Craganour threaded his way back through the .-'elieorim? crowd to the weighing, enclosure. „ Mi\,: B ower, Isroa-y; met him there, and. proudly led, him m,, amid glad shouts and noises which acclaim popular victory. Presently somebody cried "All - .rjght/* and . the flag Avith,. these nwprds .inscribed, pn. it was hoisted at the number board. , But 'it Avas not all right. An vn r authorised voice had called it, and 1 "Here, come-back '"^shouted, the-atten-dant Avhen • Craganour 's' boy started to load him^awa-y., Mr Cuncliff, ,the owner of t,he second, horse,. made no pbjectiop, but the steward entered one for, themselves; and went into the matter so ex- : haußtivoly that five minutes after five minuites; ebbed lAway,; and- still all .was. ; uncertainty. r ,-,. .■,.-. >. 1 ..' „ ! Somebody congratulated the trainer of Craganour. "I dp not seem to haVO won.

it yet," Robinson answered. Then there was more suspense, and all the time was it possible the stewards would disqualify the horse for the Derby, and that horse a tremendous favorite, when the second owner made no protest? In Tattersall's rjmg ; people were betting on the result. >io interference with the" judge's verdict was expected, though one large backer with a little fortune to stake on Craganour took £10,000 to £5000 about Aboyeur for insurance purposes. .... .: . t i i • : . It came out at last, and spread like wildfire^the ugly word disqualified. A" lot "of persons uttered uncomplimentary things' about the stewards, saying it was a case where they might have shut their eyes to things, considering it was the Derby., But . Derby or Selling Race, if there be improper riding, there should be punishment to fit the offence. ABSOLUTELY JUST. It is a calamity that Craganour should have been stood'down ;bvit the decision was so absolutely just that nobody who has the welfare of the turf at heart, and can look impartially at, things, will q"iestion it for a single moment, and this case, should exerqise a salutary influence, on the riding m future.' Somebody , described the finish as resembling polo matches— there was so much bumping, and" boring, and interference with, .horses. .... ... In an official communique thej stewards say : .'"They' heard evidence from the judge and several jockeys. "They found that Craganour did not keep a straight course, and interfered with Shogun, Day Comet, and Aboyeur. Having bumped and bored the second horse, they disqualified Craganour." , John Reiff, the jockey m question, has previously won the Derby on Orby and Tagalie. " He began his career m England, being known as "Knicker -booker," on account of his size and schoolboy clothes. Eventually he went to France, and is" still there.

There, never, was a. Derby, which produced worse riding or more interference.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PBH19130710.2.71

Bibliographic details

EXTRAORDINARY DERBY., Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXX, Issue 13124, 10 July 1913

Word Count
1,745

EXTRAORDINARY DERBY. Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XXXX, Issue 13124, 10 July 1913

Working