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THORNDON ELECTION.

NOMINATION OP CANDIDATES. The nomination of candidates for the representation of the Thorndon electorate in the House of Representatives, vice Mr. W. H. Levin, rosigned, took plaoo at the drillshed on the reclaimed land at noon today, over 150 persons being present. Mr. Jam9B Ames was the Betnrmng Offioor. Dr. Alfred K. Newman was proposed by Mr. Henry Edgar Eaton, seconded by Mr. J. Cherrott ; Mr. Thomas Dwan was proposed by Mr. T. White, seconded by Mr. Alexander M'Donald : and Mr. Henry Bunny was proposed by Mr. John Plimmer, seconded by Mr. Barry (of Messrs. Barry and M'Dowoll). With the exception of Mr. Plimmer, nono of the propoaors or seconders made any romarks in tha nomination of the candidates. Mr. Plimmor said he had come forward to pay a debt which he owed to Mr. Bunny, as, had it not been for the encouragement given by that gentleman at the time of promoting the Wellington and Manawata railway, when so many were throwing oold water on the projeot, he (Mr. Plimmer) would have given it np. The candidates then addressod tho assemblage according to the order in whioh they had been nominated. Dr. Newman said he had already addressed the oleotora twioe, and intended to do so again on Friday night at the Arcade. He hoped that during the few years he had lived here since his return from England he had gained the good will of the people, and that this good will would be manifested on Tuesday week at the ballot. He had tried for lome years past to fit himself for such a post as that he now conght, by study and by working on various committees in the town, and ho hoped, if elected, to serve thorn well— at all events, it would not bo for the wont of trying. It had been urged against him that ho wa3 too young. Well, that was a vioe whioh ho would outgrow. (A laugh.) Whon divisions carao on no would not be found wanting, and as he h»d not yot had the opportunity of breaking any pledges, ho would go in with a perfectly cloan Bhoet. He thanked those who had supported him np to the present. (Applause.) Mr. Dwan oamo forward amid muoh applause. This being a business day he would not, ho said, detain the oleotora long, especially as he had already addressed throe meotings. Two years apo ha contested the Thorndon seat with one of the most popular men of Wellington, but had to succumb to superior numbers, retiring suddenly to the base of operations in order to present himself on this ocoasion. (Laughter.) He was held too ohoaply before, but was going in this timo; and, notwithstanding the small majority by whioh he would bo eleoted, it did not follow that he would not look to tho beat interests of Wellington. Thorndon was Wellington. Take away Thorndon and they took away all the .wealth and education of tho place— (laughter)— and if they wont outride tho boundaries of Thorndon thoy oonld not get anybody they conld

nail. (Loud laughter.) A single merchant , of Thorndon could buy up the whole of Te Aro, co that when a man had to represent capital as well as talent it was something to run for. (Laughter.) If returned this time he would carry the respect of the House with him, and he- would do nothing that would impinge indirectly, on tho honour of his constituents, for be mid as fair a share of intelligence as two-thirds of the present members. (Laughter and applause.) He would like to bring under notice the question of paid canvassers. He had none of them himself, for they were not in keeping with the ballot. If elected he would make on enactment providing that every man who solicited a vote for another, whether he was an elector or not, should be liable to a penalty of .£lO, in default one month in gaol. (Laughter.) Paid canvassers lay in their jungle, ready to pounce on tha innocent eleotor. He would stick to their doors and tell lies abont tho othor candidates. (Laughter.) He was worse than a murdorer— he was a calumniator, he was a detractor. (Applauso and laughter.) He would put all such down, because they oarried on thoir brows the mark of Cain. (Lond laughter.) Whon one of them came to their doors, let them turn up the book of Genesis and look at the condition of affairs with those two blotted-out cities, and there they would find the perfeot prototype of a paid canvasser in the ruffians who followed up the angels. (Roars of laughter.) If he had the same following on this occasion as before, he would go in at the head of the poll. (Applause.) Mr. Bonny, who was warmly roceived, said that although he came hist on the roll, he would be first at tho poll. (Applause.) The , electors had already learned his views, and probably he would address them again before the oleotion took plaoe. He looked upon this contest as one not so much between Dr. Newman and himself as between Mr. Cattell and himself, and he only wished he had Mr. Cattell on his side, and he hoped that this would not cause any ill-feeling between them, having been friends so long. (Applause.) Thorndon wanted a man to repre- < sent it who was not in the same groove as the othor mombers for the Wellington district, excepting Mr. Hutchison— one who did not come to represent the landed and wealthy class of the country. He advooatod a change in the inoidence of taxation. The necessaries of life should be relieved from tho Customs duties, and proporty ahould be made to pay the difference (Loud applause.) His idea of fighting a contest like this was to fight fairly and straightforwardly, and, to far aa he was concerned, that should be done. As editor of tho New Zealand Times Dr. Newman had an advantage over him, and he ncticed that in & nub-leader he wrote the other day, Dr. Newman said he (Mr. Bunny) had stated that if eleotod for Thorndou ho would drop the Wairarapa. Ho never said anything of the sort. What ho did say was, that if elected for Thorndon, and the city tlectoratos were amalgamated, as ho believed would be the case next session, then his services would be at the disposal of the oity of Wellington if requested. If a better candidate were wanted in his place, thon he would go back to his old love, the Wairarapa. He did not think the handbill circulated by Dr. Newman at his (Mr. Bunny's) first meeting had done that candidate any good, though he did not so much objeot to the " Thorndon Cup " handbill, whioh, while containing a few mistakes, was circulated in a fair spirit. In conclusion, be trusted that bis followers would do what he believed they would— viz., place him at the head of the poll to-morrow week. (Loud applause.) A show of hands was then taken, and the Returning Officer declared the result to be in favour of Mr. Dwan. He declined, however, to state the numbers. Mr. Bunny thereupon demanded a poll. The Returning Officer fixed Tuesday, the 13th inst., for the taking of a poll. Mr. Dwan moved a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, and the assemblage dispersed.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18840505.2.28

Bibliographic details

THORNDON ELECTION., Evening Post, Volume XXVII, Issue 106, 5 May 1884

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THORNDON ELECTION. Evening Post, Volume XXVII, Issue 106, 5 May 1884

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