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RACING AT DONCA STER.

"Beautiful weather prevailed for the 'Doncaster meeting in September. The Sportsman'reports that there was a field of eleven for the Fitzwilliam Stakes, which always heads the first day's card. Joe Ullmann won the race la-st year, starting at 9 _to I, and this year he repeated that victory, starting at 5 to 2. It is curious that these are the only two yacea that the Anioricasflpbred geldine

has won since he was imported two years ago"!, j The Champagne Stakes was an interesting j race, the meeting of Veles and Star Shoot,V the two sons ol Isinglass, with Orchid and! Lord Bobs being looked forward to with much" excitement. Lord Bobs did not run up ty ' expectation, and Veles and Star Shoot both; had to knock under to Orchid, on whom' Sloan rode a waiting race and won cleverly, by three parts of a length. Orchid, by 6rmc{ out of Musiey Maid, by Trappist from Festive, by Carnival, is not a big one, but he is strong-loined and strong-necked, deepgirthed, and well ribbed up, a bad walker, and pottering in his slow paces, but a rare mover when on the stretch. Though Lord Bobsj as at York, showed great speed for five furlongs, after which Veles appeared to have a winning chance, Sloan on Orcidd was onlybiding his time, and riding a nicely timed 1 finish he won just cleverly if not easily. An enormous crowd assembled on the Town, Moor on the second day to witness he decision of the 125 th race for the St. Leger. Neither La Roche nor Merry Gal being entered, it was obvious that nothing but an accident or a recrudescence of that excitability, displayed by the colt in the spring could jeopardise the victory of Diamond Jubilee, especially as his most dangerous qpponent, Simon Dale, had gone amiss, and struck out of the race. A larger field than was at one time anticipated came to the post, 11 horses facing the starter. The Prince of "Wales was not present to see his crack take part in the race, owing to the Royal Family being in deep mourning for the lats Duke of SaxeGoburg and Gotha, biit the colt ran in his name and colours. There were one or two slight breaks away, but nothing occurred to upset the equanimity of the favourite, who was on his best behaviour, and when the flag went down got well away. Always holding a good place, his jockey took him to the front rather more than a mile from home, and, having all his opponents settled in the run home, he won very easily by a length and ahalf from Elopement. Courlan, who. was ridden out to the end, was -placed third, and Sailor Lad fourth. Mardi, who many thought could have been close up with Elopement, was not persevered, with when the favourite was seen to have the race in hand.; The race was run at a great pace, the excellent state of the going being very favourable to fast time. As a matter of fact, the time was the fastest on record for the race,, the next best being that of Seabreeze in 1888. "Never in my time," writes Mr Allison, "was a Leger won more easily, though seme people thought Elopement was making a race of it at the finish, and oth«rs went so far as to blame M. Cannon for waiting so long. In point of fact, the winner had his field dead settled a furlong from home, and if he hung at all in the last hundred yards or so, it was solely because he was feeling lonely — as happened to Flying Fox in his Derby. The winner sweated profusely atter the race —'just as if he wasn't fit,' said Marsh. But it is a healthy sign, and I shoulfi imagine Diamond Jubilee will never be cleaner wound' up. The time in which the distance was covered was first-rate for this race, and Herbert Jones, who had to go to the front about a mile from home, deserves all praise for the way in which he set an absolutely true pace from that point. Had an American jockey been in the saddle, we should all have been belauding the performance to the skies." The third day was a day of 'close finish^?., die firstfour races being all desperately close, one dead-heat, and the other three races each anly won by a head. There_ was 'a rattling se.t-to between "Lucknow," Eager,' Sir Hercules, and Vatel for the Portland Plate. It was not altogethei a satisfactory race, however, and partisans of each of the three animals that did not win were confident that with a clear course the result would have been different. In the case of Eager, the owner lodged a complaint agamst^Sloan for unfair riding, the jockey of Lucknow having crossed Eager early in the race, a charge which the x stewards, after investigation, considered sufficiently serious to cau^e them to suspend Sloan from riding for the remainder of the meeting. Before that decision had been coirfj to, however, the jockey in question had ricjaen Hoopoo to victory in the Juvenile Selling I late, and had iv a later race finished second' for the third time during the day. .The race of the fourth day, in point of interest though not of value, was the Cup, for which La Roche had to give 71b to King's Courier and 101b to Merry Gal. Odds of 6to 5 were laid on her chance, but she was unable to cope with the Amorican-bred son of Kingston who won in the style of a good horse by three parts of a length from Merry Gal.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW19001031.2.128

Bibliographic details

RACING AT DONCA STER., Otago Witness, Issue 2433, 31 October 1900

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953

RACING AT DONCA STER. Otago Witness, Issue 2433, 31 October 1900

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