Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LONDON.

(from the daily times correspondent.)

"War with Germany." '' The Channel fleet off to the Baltic." " England and Denmark for e v er ." — Such is the language in London streets such the posters at newspaper offices. I hope not to weary your readers ; but now, when Britain's gallant sons buckle on their armour and prepare for the fray, it is proper all should know how patient we have been under lone suffering — how slow to wrath. At length the Lion's roused, and if fight we must, the world thall witness that ■we fight like men, — and " Heaven defend the right "

We have passed through a terrible crisis, and to avoid war have exposed ourselves to tannta at home and ridicule abroad. The Conference assembled on \\xq 28lhult , when a compromise was suggested, Germ my requiring the Duchies to be severed from Denmark, and given to Prince Augustenberg; England and the other neutrals proposing to cut Scnleswig in half, allowing Copenhagen ti retain the Danish portion, and placing the other part, together with Holstein. under the sovere'gnty of some Prince who should hold it as a neutral State, protected by the contracting parties. Both these ideas were rejected by the l)anes, v/ho preferred to fight for what was left rather than be further robbed. Conference met again on the 2nd inst , when a prolongation of the armistice for 14 days was proposed. Th>-y assembled aga'n on the 6th, when the prolongation was agreed to, nith a condition on behalf of Denmark that the extended time should not be for any idle purpose of delay, but practically employed in lonafide, efforts at a satisfactory solution ; this waa retuaed by Prussia, and the Conference adjourned without effecting any object. It met again on the 9th, when a fortnight's longer suspension of hostilities was agreed on ; and thus instead of war being resumed on the 12th as originally fixed, it was postponed until the 26th. Subsequent meetings were held, and the neutral powers with coiiEem of penmark, at length proposed a boundary line which should for ever separate Germany from Denmark ; to this Prussia agreed, ''provided the boundary suited her ;" and then c&ms the difficult task of drawing the line : Germany insisted on Tondern as the boundary, whilst Denmark insisted on the line of the Dannewirke and the Schlei ; and this was the "xtent of the comprjmise. The disputed boundary is dessribed as a mere belt formed by two parallel lines about 25 miles distant from each other — but neither Dane nor German would budge an inch from their position ; and" all the effortß of the neutrals to effect a further compromise' were useless. In addition to which the Schleswipgers claimed to be heard on the impo'tant tubjeet of their nationa'ity '♦ under which King, Bezonian !" These difficu'ties bringinsurmountable, it was proposod by England, aa the last chance of peace, to refer the boundary to the arbitration cf some disinterested Sovereign, all disputed questions to be settled by his award, which was to be binding on all parties, and ratified by Europe ; to this Prussia replied—" rfhe had no objection to arbitration, but reserved to herself the liberty to submit to the award or not, according as the decision suited German interests." This childish, selfish, and insulting expression of Germnnj's deteterraination brought matters to an end ; nothing could possibly be done with such flagrant chicanery and dishonesty— argument and reason were alike Unavailing, and the Conference broke up on the 22nd instant, a decided failure. They met again yesterday merely in a formal manner to exchange papers and take leave, and this very day hostilities may be resumed. Boih Germany and Denmark have been preparing for the renewal of the struggle, increasing their forces and strengthening their positions, and now that the err is once more war, neither party shrinks from its responsibilities ; indeed according to the tone of peoples and papers, war is hailed, if not as a blessing, as the only means of making both ends meet, but Copenhagen cannot expect long to resist her giant foes, and to judge from their antecedent?, we may look for anj amount of remorseless cruelty, oppressim, and injustice from Germany, if unchecked by some of the great powers— ambition may even lead them on to the extinction of the Danish monarchy, and it is to prevent this we send our fleet into the Baltic, giving such further aid as may be determined on. Such is the last month's history of this momen tous question. Throughout the Conference England has been in a most embarrassing position ; "and at length, when arbitration presented itself to us as the only chance left of averting war, it wo rejected by both belligerents, who prefer to settle the matter by the Bword ; whilst our co- neutrals, France and Russia, affect a perfect unconcern, and view the unequal combat with feelings no stronger than curiosity. But now the Conference is over, and has failed in its object through the unbending obstinacy and wilfulne*s of Prussia in advancing and insisting on palpably unjust claims in the name of Fatherland. The whole proceedings will be laid before Parliament to-morrow ; Government will explain their past Conduct, their preset position, and their immediate intentions; the country will then know how far its honcr has been compromised or maintained, and how far the recommendations of Ministers deserve its confidence in their honest but vain endeavors to preserve peace. What they BOW propose as the polisy of England on the resumption of hostilities betwixt. Germany and Denmark is all important : but whatever may be resolved as" the duty of Great Britain it will be readily undertaken by all classes. England's honor and Europe's safety may call us to the fields of Schleswig and the Baltic waters, but the reckless Germans may rest assured that, even aa in argument we stood much bullying, insult, and humbug, co shall we in the inur of battle stand a deal of beating.

It will be seen that from the beginning Prussia was intent on aggression, and resorted to the meanest subterfuaes, as witness her proposal to extend the armistice for two months, that she might have time to Germanise the Duchiep, and throw the Danes over the season in which their navy would be 80 useful — a tone of defiance was adopted with an apparent recklessness of consequences, seeming to court the anger of neutral powers; insi-ting on the most unreasonable term 0 , and displaying an utter want of respect for rights and treaties — repudiating one day what was previously agreed to ; disregarding the friendly remonstrances of all, and laughing to Bcora the will and the powor of England to check the spoliation to which Bismarck and King William had pledged themselves ; and that they

are resolutely bent on mischief is shewn by their large purchases of vessels and their threat to issue letters of marque if the Danish blockade was renewed ; but they have perhaps had their Inst grin nt us, and when the Union Jack flouts in the breezes of the Baltic their tone may alter somewhat ; for with all their braggadocia they must be well aware how much they have to Jo9e should the war assume those large dimensions which appear too probable. A* to Austria, she would gladly creep out of this mess if possible, fjr she too has much to lose and has senss enough to under- tand ber position. Russia shews no inclination to interfere. France sny3 ' Let tin^land fight if she likes, there is no occasion for war at all; adopt universal snffrnge and the Duchies wiil declare for themselves." Sweden will cheerfully afsiat her little friend when she dares. Denmark, of course, wants peace if it can be had honorably, but Booner than be stripped quite naked she will fight a little longer; certainly there were moments of despairing agony when she had thoughts of getting strength by Scandinavian unity, or (as some folks say) by choosing between two evila, and thereby making peace with her eoemiea and joining the German Confederation ; again despair would seize on Copenhagen, and as no help came from Constitutional powers, it was suggested to seek aid from the revolutionary elements of Europe, inviting foreign legions under Garibaldi and other heroe3.

The guillotine hw done its awful work on Dr. Pommeraw, and Madame, his widow, retires to n convent. M. le Docteur conspired wth a female patient to derraud the Insurance offices, and this was the plot : — Policies were to be < fleeted on the lady's life, shs was then to be very ill, and the companies were to be frightened into a compromise. The poor rictim allowed herself to be made really ill by Galen's nostrums, the policies were assigned over to the worthy Doctor, «nd then the gent'eman bethought him how easy it was to put his co-conspirator quite out of harm's way : so she wsb forthwith poisoned and her kind friend claimed the insurance nioney,--but the companies smelt • rat, and the public executioner speedily bronght the tragedy to a close. The French Government has thought proper to perform a midnight trespass on the dwellings, and sieze the persons and paperß of several influential barristers and other gentry of the Opposition class ; the pretext being some connection with secret societies, but in fact a ministerial dodge respecting municipal elections. Against this unconstitutional proceeding there is naturally a loud outcry by tho^e lawyers who have but recently been permitted to ♦• say their say ;" but Bonapartism can stand a tidy dose of such impotent wrath just now, or at all events thinks it can and so tries it on accordingly. " Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown" «omebody says ; and I ssy " poor Bonaparte "—" — if he will be the greatest man in Europe he has no sinecure and few need envy his Al position. From decided hard work he retires for a fortnight'd rest to the proud hulls of Fqntainbleau ; but if the' present programme of halfhour telegrams and couriers be continued, it is only a small share of repoae that will fall to the Emperor's lot - one would think ttiat not even Corsican stamina can much longer endure the strain. But Majesty was nearly drowned in the lake whilst practising the awkward science of walking on the water's surface with some patent apparatus wh'ch Imperial France would not believe in until the experiment was personally tried; the pßpera, however, are not allowed to discuss such sacred matters, and we have only rumor to rely on. It is likewise said that since hw ducking friend Nap was thrown violently fiom hi 3 horse ; if these mishaps are real they are alarming— but fortunately a charmed life 6eems to proVct this wonderful mati, who, if he would condescend to speak in plain language might truly say "after me, chaos."

Flourishing accounts have been forwarded from Mexico ; it is to be a mine of wealth to French traders- General Beuaine hss smoothed the way pretty well for the new Emperor, having by this time hung, drawn and quartered two-thirds of the b r igands and frightened the other fraction out of sight ; the highways are tolerably clear of such cut throat nuisances, and it is charmingly said thnt Maximilian will only have to execute the other third of his murderous subjects, and commerce will then go free, the beautiful city will be the resort of nations, the mineral wealth of the country will diffuse prosperity amongst all classes — credit will beejtibliahed abroad, and aMexiran citizen for once be a man of repute. All this looks well— may no American buccaneer step In to disfigure the picture. Conflicting narrative* of Juarez, his sayings and doings, also arrive, but they are not much heeded, and no way tend to disturb the pleasing sketch given above. The volunteer army, however, don't turn up so rapidly as was expected ; there were to be 20,000 of such folk, and the Austrian contingent 6,000 strong, have refused the march to glory and fams unless the military rank they may acquire is guaranteed them in the Austrian army.

From Tunis alarming dispatches are cent ; the Bey's position is most precarious — and the matter was considered co serious a few days back as to induce France and Italy to consider the propriety of taking possession of the capital. A Government magazine lately exploded at Tripoli, doing much damage and killing several hundreds of people. The Pope's health and London Conference have been knotty points for study at Turin during the past month ; nevertheless time could be found to celebrate the anniversary of the kirgdom; national fever was up, and the cry of " Italy for the Italians" spread like wild fire through Home and Venetia, despising alike Pontifical reproof and Austrian vengeance ; then came the grand question of the hour, the hopes and fears attending European conflagration. But whether it's war for Denmark, war in the Principalities, or war for Rome and Venefcia, something must be done by that excited people when the clarion sounds ; the world is in arms, or about to be, and the present state of sunny Italy is represented as beyond endurance. Garibaldi ia again on the move ; he wanders abroad in Sutherland's yacht, and although the General is said to be merely seeking health, trying the waters of Ischia, &2., it is no wey assuring to Continental autocracy ; for the slightest movement of this genius creates a queer sensation amongst God's anointed.

Continental royalty shows extensively just now. The King of Prussia receives Russian Majesty at Potsdam ; whilst at Kissennen the new Holy Alliance appears Retting into form— Austria, Russia, and Prussia meet in solemn conclave there, with other magnates too insignificant to specify. What Bonaparte thinks of the " old story newly revived" your readers may imagine ; he has probably enough business on hand without bothering about such trifles j on the pinch la belle

France can take care of herself, and that will do for him. But Russia is to some extent the unknown e'ement in the European problem, and the Czar's viait at this critical juncture is full of import — it may solve the question whether the triumph of Germany or Denmark would be most conducive to Russian interests. Complication? increase, and fresh anxieties arise with every movement of these dread potentates, and in dealing with their treacherous and diplomatic chicanery our Russell and Palmerston have all their work to do. It may be thnt Alexander wishes to prevent the bare possibility of Denmark enterr g the Bund, as Germany would then be a formidable power in the eyes of Petersburg statesmen ; whilst a mere Scandinavian unitj would bi3 held of little account, for, supposing the union of Gilmar to be revived, the same sovereign to rule at Copenhagen, Christiana, and Stockholm, it is doubtful how far the aggrandisement of Russia would be jeopardised; thus it would seem thnt the balance of interest induces Russia to coalesce with Germany rather than Denmark, and the Berlin journey looks like business. The young King of Greece has voyaged in state to the lonian Islands, formally taken possession, and (July incorporated them with the Hellenic Kingdom, and it is to be hoped he will not find his Island friends so troublesome as we did. For many years we had them under our "Wternal wing, and at much expense and trouble endeavoured to improve and regenerate the people and their institutions, but got small thanks for our pains — they are dow out of leading strings and must learh better manners; from England they are separate 1 ' for ever. Certainly we miujht have wished a more affectionate parting ; but since they hesitate not to rfjoice disdainfully at their escape from Great Britain we may be allowed to reciprocate the spntiment — joy go with them. Spain, in her ambition to ri*e like Phoenix from her ashes and worthlessness, again 6ends forth her fleets and armies against the denizens of that new world, where formerly the very name of a Spaniard struck such terror. Little wars may serve to get her hand in before contending with foemen worthy of Hidalgo steel ; San Domingo c carcely affords scope for Castilian prowess. i o a quarrel is picked with Peru, and the Spanish Admiral forthwith pounces on the rich treasures of the Chincha Islands. To lake material guarantees from weak States is now the bad fashion of great powers, and the Peruvian republic is made to feel forcibly the new idea. The guano of the Chinches yields sixteen million dollars annually, which is no mean prize for doughty beggared Spain; but the interest of French and English loans happens to be secured on the profits of this manure, and the filibuster squadron may yet have to answer some awkward question?, propounded by parties somewhat better able to enforce attention than the once happy home of ''Holla the brave." The Danubinn provinces are still the source mach uneasiness and danger. Prince Oouza s been doing a little coup d' etht on his own account. He dissolves his parliament, and tears up that con-titution which was framed by the protecting powers of the United principalities; he despoils the rich and scatters their property amongst the people; he courta revolution whilst he braves the anger and defies the military strength of Russia, Austria and Turkey — in alf this he is supposed to be inspired from the Tuileries ; but by whomsoever prompted his audacious perfidy is not quite unheeded — he is summoned by his Suzerain to Constantinople, there to answer for hia outrageous conduct. Such capers as thtse must be checked ; the growing evil nipped in the bud. or 'twill be no fault of eentle Oouza if "Roumania does not shortly present another European battle field. The renowned Alabama is no more; she had a fair stand-up fight with the Federal steam frigate Kearsage, on Sunday, 19tU instant, oft Cherbourg, and went down in deep water, after one hour's «harp artillery practice at a distance varying from one mile to a quarter of a mile ; she had a crew of 120 ; and the wounded Captain Semmes, with 40 men more or less disabled,' were saved from drowning and brought into Southampton Bhortly after the battle by the Knglish yacht Deerhound, the remainder being either killed, rescued by French boate, or prisoners in safe custody of the victorious Capt Winslow. For full two years or more, like another Vanderdecken, has Captain b'emmes in his dreaded Alabama, superior to mortal efforts at capture, roamed the neas on his destructive mission, defying the whole strength of the Federal navy, and laughing at that formidable Vauderbilt which was rushing after him and always arriving just in time to be too late; but the Kearsage wa* entirely another guess matter. Winslow started on Alabama's trail with the uioito " Semmes or this child," found his prey at Cherbourg, kept vigilant watch, and (with a trifling loss) in one short hour did more for the Union than Grant and his legion:) may ever hope to achieve on Virginian soil Each ship carried eight guns and a crew of from 120 to 150, the Kearssgo being partially iron-clad, and carrying somewhat heavier metal than her opponent ; and why the Confederate chieftain should have risked this defeat is most surprising. Did his prudence desert him *} Did he weary of warfare upon the defenceless, or did conscience or self-respect sug gest at least one glorious battle to redeem his name from piracy? This hero of a hundred boastful captures of Helpless merchantmen, had long struck terror into the heart of the moat confident, as also to one of the strongest naval powers in the world. " Alabama" was the fearful name which, thundered through a speaking tiumpet, brought down stars and stripes as if by mngic. But, "Where are we now Vis a auestion which the redoubtable rover and his crew may ask themselves at leisure in the hospitable land of the Britishers. Whether or not Semmes was oriered out of Cherbourg don't appear, but that he was ful y alive to the peril of the encounter is clear enough, a<*, on the previous evening, he gave his ship's papers and valuables to Mr Lancaster, the owner of the Deerhound, saying, "I shall go and fight the Keavsage tomorrow." The battle commenced at the distance of a mile, and the two ships were nearly half-a-mile apart throughout the action, no attempt at boarding being made by either. Is there not something ominous in such an engagement, within our own seas— on a Sabbath morning too, during Divine service ? A lesson it should be to all who contemplate naval warfare. Only sup pose a contention between two ships of the "Warrior. class! One or both must go to the bottom in much less time than did this lightheeled Alabama, and with, perhaps, ten time 9 the loss of life. Let the rulers of the earth lake heed.

The Circassian exodus is still a melancholy spectacle before the world ; and such a terrible

doom closing the history of a gallant race might naturally be expected to excite all sympathies, but 'tis not so ; for with the exception of England there is no nation stepping forward to the assistance of Turkey in her benevolent efforts to alleviate the sufferings of Circassian flying mul-*"> titude. To escape from the hated dominion of their barbarous conquerors, the wretched people make for Turkish ports in the Black Sea, where, from exhaustion, fiunine, and disease, hundreds perish daily; and such sickening scenes of misery are related aa would be painful to repeat. All th*t Turkish generosity can effect is freely administered, but it falls far short of the require' ments; and now a very extensive relief fund is being organised here to tide over the hour of calamity, whilst the poor creatures gradually domicile in their adopted country. From India th^re is but little news, except matters a la militd r6 ; the native army of Bengal is being strengfcheued, whilst that of Madras is reduced. The 18th Regiment is in special disgrace, and being broken up, touching the robbery of the Government cash chest at Cannamorc, with the guardianship of which that regiment was entrusted. The Scinde frontier is in uproar by contending factions, with which, however, we are not yet mixed up : but it is rumored that a large force is to be sent on a chastising errand to Buootan, so there are troubles in perspective. Gordon is again in arnn for Imperial Tartary ; he hunts the Taepings from pillar to post, and vice versa ; slaughters them by thousands ; and promises to stifle rebellion in four months. The Major will by this time have heard of England's resolve to leave Chinese affairs to native intelligence, and therefore must make his election between Horse Guards epaulets and Mandarin buttons.

In Japan the Council of Daimios agree on a peaceful policy in reference to intercourse with foreigners ; the sweets of trade have beea tasted, and the fiery Prince Satzuina now thinks it compatible with even his dignity to turn an honest penny in bargain and sale with the " outer barbarian." So far well and good ;j but the next letter from Europe may create a clatter amongst the tea trays. In France the Japanese Ambassadors have had their audience ; received with due politeness ; N. 111. very glad to see them, &c ; but he distinctly told their bronzed highnesses that international laws must be respected in distant countries and protection given to peaceable traders, Frenchmen in particular — they could put that in their pipes aud duly smoke the same. They will probably soon bow themselves out of France, aid bring their flat sconces and paper pocket handkerchiefs to John Bull's fireside ; and when their twelvemonths' holiday runs out, return with the tidings that native jugglery, will no longer suit the European book : and should the " happy despatch" policy still be a delicacy, they can reveal some wholesome truths' which may benefit all parties.

Dr Livingstone is pronounced in the flesh and on his way to Kngland. The good man is providentially saved ; and although the Mission is a failure, the worthy Doctor has done the State some service, and will be heartily welcomed, returning fivm numerous hairbreadth escapes to enjoy his well-earned leisure and give unto others the full benefit of his wanderings.

A memorial wai recently erected to the honor of Wm. John Wills, at his native place, Totnpss, Devon : the monument is of granite, 26ft high, on a base Bft square, on which will be placed a medallion porti ait and an inscription of the fatal Australian exploration with, poor Burke. The marriage of Corate de Paris with his fair cousin ot Spain, was lately celebrated at Claremont: P.P. Wales, together with the flower of British chivalry graced the weddingfeast — the aged exile, Louis Phillippe'a widow-queen was " there to see ; " all wa,3 bright and fair ; and our best wishes are with them. Had this Orleans race behaved as well in France as they have in England, their present pilgrimage might have been obviated ; as it is, their lot is not a very hard one— they are all together in the land of the free ; have an abundance of the needful ; are welcome guests at Windsor Castle and Marlborough House ; are much respected wherever they go, and are wise enough to avoid politics — under such circumstances they can well afford to wait patiently for a second e<iit ; on of sovereignty, or aught else which may turn "up. By tne bye, Montpensier is very ill ; he came from Bpain to attend his daughter's nuptials, caught cold, and at onetime was in extremis, but is now pronounced out of danger. The Duke ot Coburg is reported alarmingly ill. This gentleman was the prime mover in the DanoG erin an war, and cm claim the honor of expediting the present troubles. As Prince Alfred is next heir to the throne, according to the laws of the Duchy, our nautical pet may shortly be called upon to exchange liis blue jacket, light heart, and naval promotion, for purple robes and the responsibilities attendant on the wearingof them.

The Cambridge Collegians held their gorgeous festival on the 2 ad, 3rd, and 4th instant. To that gay scene did Albert Edward take the fair 'lexandra, when the heir to England's crown duly graduated as " Dr. Wales, of Trinity," and the cares of State were banished awhile j for what with latin recitals, complimentary speechify* ing, the grandest of balls, the choicest of banquets, all sorta of College junketings, and threecheers for the baby, the time passed oS right merrily ; and the Prince and his wife will long remember their Whitsuntide holiday. The Islington international Dog Show next engaged " Dr. Wales's" attention, and here he was again at homeamongst the people ; four prizes were awarded to him, and afcer three hours' sojourn with the mongrel tribe, H. fc. H. hastened westward to " home and beauty," much plea r ed witli his day's amusement and canine success.

Gigantic hotels are " cropping up" all over England ; their astounding altiturte is quite bewilderiDg, and m vchinery is employed to hoist the visitors to their respective dormitories. Certainly this saves them from the fatigue of a mountainous journey to the upper regions, and Is so far highly commendable; but should some uncturnal conflagration chance to happen in any of these eky-rakers, the exalted position of aspiring slumberera will be most deplorable ; and our Humane Society must keep an eye on such, vanities.

We" are last clearing away' tho turnpike nui« sance ; an Act comes into operation next week whereby 51 miles of road near London, on the Middlesex side of the Thames, will be freed from the obstruction of gates and side bars ; such roads henceforth to be handled by the parishes as common highways The Yelverton crae kas been before tho Lorda for the last three weeks, and is not' over yet— the Irish marriage is quite upset, but the Scotch part of the performance is all iaaJavor of the

lady, and I prophecy a verdict in her favor. That the gallant Major has committed acts unbecoming sn officer and a gentleman, is beyond question ; the Law Lords are dead against him, and his own counsel dislike the job they have in hand (barring the fee department), for the present legal oeerdom has had quantum sxiff of sentimental love letters, and the cause is adjourned sine die.

_ The Mersey steam rams are at length out of limbo, and in a fair way to compensate us for all our anxiety. Prosecutions are abandoned- witnesses return to their homes; and the Messrs Laird, instead of contesting their right to buili for this or thnt belligerent, trusting to Sir Hugh Cairns special pleading, and getting perhaps, six months at the tread mill, or being ruined in the Exchequer Chamber, very wisely accept an off r of purchase from Government— : 220,000 down on the nail is far better than running risks on a doubtful question of international law— and thus the builders see their own again with a litfle to boot, and England adds two good ships to her fleet ; American jealousy is silenced ; and even body supposed to be satisfied. The abuses of Greenwich Hospital are again argued and hope at last appears— a scheme ia to be adopted allowing out pensioners, and providing better for those in-doors ; the " double management" is equashed ; useless officials come to grief; and jolly Jack-tar gets largely benefited. The annual income is L 154.000; a"d 170,000 can be saved without pinching— this large surplus is not to accumulate to be ultimately dissipated in some huge jobbery, but will be turned to good account; pensioners will be allowed to live amongst their relations or friends instead of being forced into the detestable monastic life enjoined by Hospital regulations, whilst our indoor friends will get those little creature comforts which age and infirmity require—and all this good is at length proposed to be effected by Somerset's Duke, our pre-ent First Lord.

Gladstone has dtimfoundered old Pam, the Ministers, and po iticians of all shapes, sorts, and sizss, by what is termed " a i\ volutionary speech" in the House of Commons on the Borough Franchise ; he suggests the suffrage tor every man not morally or intellectually disqualified— this is not quite universal suffrage, but it is the nearest approach to it ever yet broached by leading statesmen. Win. Ewart Gladstone goes in a buster just now for public favor, and looks marvellously like the coming man. Another attempt has been made by Government on behalf of the pet project of the late Prince Consort, to remove the National Gallery from Trafalgar Square to Kensington, and to give up the premises to the Royal Academy. Now the R. A.'s have plenty of coin to erect a shed of their own wherever Sir Chatles Eastlake and Co., may think fit ; and at present the people are indisposed to relinquish their rights to the old shop, for although ugly it is central, and we can see the pretty pictures without much loss of time. Ministers were defeated, and it is much to be regretted thsy should risk their popularity on obnoxious measures like unto this one. Earl Shaftesbury has kindly given his attention to chimney climbing. Notwittatanding legislative enactments, thousands of little children are Bcientificdliy soaked in brine to hatden their limbs for this revolting occupation; but very severe penalties will henceforth be awarded, and we hope to put a stopper on the cruel propensities of stony-hearted Master Chummy. Somes, M P., Hull, has had another flinj* at Sunday public-house trading, followed by Law*on, M. P., Carlisle, te restrict the sale of intoxicating liquors; both gentlemen being signally defeated. • An Englishman's privilege ia to do that which seems to him best, so lomr a-* he respects the right of others and pays his dues to the State. Our beer we must have, and we may be as thirsty on the Sabbath as other days : so white we behave tolerably decent, work like niggers, and set patterns to the hum™ race. Messrs Somes Brothers, with all their good intentions, are out of order when interfering with the honest laborer's taste and recreation, and by this time they ought to know it.

Sir Rowland Hill is rewarded for h ; s «minent public services at the Post-Office with a parliamentary grant of L2o.ooo— none too much for thirty years' hard work, resulting in immense benefit to mankind • tliisum is in addition to his full retiring salary of LiOOO per annum. He has likewi c been inTited to Oxford, where, amidst the "pomp and circumstance" of the learned great, he honored the (Jniversity by allowing himself to be dubbed a D.C.1,. ; and now as friend Rowland is in his seventieth year, we can only wish him that quiet rest and enjoyment so fairly his due. _ Lady Elgin is to receive L2OOO a year, in consideration of the late Earl's devotion to his country, and in consequence of his family being left insufficiently provided for. LSOO a year is awarded to Lady In&lis, tbe widow of Sir John, the gallant defender of Lucknow ; no one grumbles at this, for we recolieci; what the soldier did, and how his wife and children shared that dreadful campaign. Kenny Meadows r^eeivej 180 annually from the Queen's civil pension list. Elizi Oook and Mrs Sheridan Knowles get 1,100 a year each from the same source.

The will of the late engineer Maudslay, of the Westminster road, was lately proved, and the personalty sworn under L 250,000. The Olympic theatre has passed into the hands of a Joint Stock Company with some high sounding names of title and repute at tbe head of the list. Adelina Patti quite storms the town as Margueretta in Faust ; as an actress and singer fine is proclaimed unrivalled. Master Willie Pape, the juvenile American pianist, is one of our musical wonders, and is honored by Royal commands at Marlbro' home. We also have another little wonder, Fraulein Krers, a German lassie, who came out with eclat on the grand piauo ; she too has been patronised by the highest in the land, and at Windsor Castle fairly " astonished * fl e natives." Batsman's Leah fs run out. eothern s Dundreary is deac— sensation has gone f\ , travels, and theatricals in general are tolerably quiet. Of course Paul Bedford and O Toole still keep the game alive. The profession behaved, as all the world knows, most scurvily to old Will Shakspeare, but came mt like themselves lately on the occasion of a benefit for Cowell's family-poor Sam in his palmy hours took no heed of " a rainy day," consequently the wife and seven children wanted help, and they had it. Goxwell's new balloon the " Britannia," chows aifd performs continually at the Crystal Palace much to the wonderment of our old folkß at borne, they being comparative strangers to such stupendous creations ; for although it makes no pretention to vie with the soaring genius of a Wadar, it is by far the largest ever manufactured

by sober Englishmen, and as it is in careful hands and promises some useful additions to science, friend Coxwell is allowed to be a hero. The monster is however, at time 3 ungovernable, an 1 on two recent occasions placed its intrepid occu pants and the helps in extreme peril. There are prophets abroad preaching an awful conclusion to "Britannia's" career.

The Count Lesrange's Fille de 1' Vir, had an easy victory at Epsom, she won the Oiks in a walk ; and the numerous visitors oa the Lidies day witnessed an unusual scene of excitement, uproar, and violence, The mare it will be remembered was heavily backed to win the "Two Thou3and" at Newmarket, and is supposed to have been pulled according to orders, and consequently the ea«e with which she directly afterwards carried off the French Oaks, and Epsom ditto, caused such a strong feelini? amongst British sportsmen that the Count deemed it prudent td beat a hasty retreat to native laud ; and it required all the practical energy of hired pugilists to protect the French quadruped, her jockey, and trainer from Lynch law on Epsom downs. Whether the English racing world is more honest and straightforward than Bonaparte's aristocracy may be open to argument, but that the Queen's lieges don't like to be " done" by the polite Mossoo was roughly testified at Ep*om. We have been assiduous in teaching our neighbors the high art of horse racing, cricket, and other sciences, and they prove apt scholars ; but if all be true which we hear of M. le Comte and his stud, we must deplore the fact of French noblemen so speedily acquiring the dirty habits of English vagabondism on the turf.

Tbe grand Prix de Paris (worth nearly LIO,OOO, and open to the blood of all nations) was contended for on Sunday, sth inst , at Longchamps, in the presence of Emperor, Empress, and Child of France ; and this, the greatest turf prize in the world, was won by M. Delamatre'a Vermouth. Blair Athol was second, Bois Roussel third ; Fille de lAir came in third in fact, but her jockey not weighing in time she was distanced. Two to one was laid on Blair Aihol, three to one against Fille de lAir, Beven to one atrainst Bois Roussel, and fifteen to one against the winner. Thia victory by a French outsider over the crocks of Gaul and Albion shews once more the uncertainty attending horse racing ; but it was a French victory, and oar neighbors were j'>yful after their fashion, even the sombre silent Chief was moved to enthusiasm at this additional glory to the empire. We have had our Royal Ascot amidst weather all serene. P. P. Wales and all the family, " bar one," were there ; the Queen had just performed a 600 mile journey in twenty hours from Balmoral, and although in improved health Her Majesty was content with Windsor Castle during the race week, leaving the honors and pleasures of the course to the youmrsters. The gold cup was won by Mr Merry's Scottish Chief; Little Stag was second ; Lord Zetland third. A frightful railway collision at Egham concluded the first grand diy, and the old story explains it in a few words — extra traffic and want of extra caution six passengers were killed, and very many previously maimed; amongst the latter was Heenan, of Beneoia fame. A verdict of minßlau:*hter is re turned against engine-driver and fireman. After Ascot we desceaded to our plebeian carnival at Hampton ; where London can always be seen in its prime —rain or shine it matters not ; ancient reminiscences are co^eut, and Cockneys go to famous Moulsey hurst out of compliment to Cribb and Molyneux— any way it is a* joyous outing : and although it's there the " Costeys 1 ' most do congregate, and the unwashed rough nnd humble gentry meet in shoals, they as a rule don their best behaviour for the nonce ; their donkey tandpms cut a very respectable figure, nnd " Mrs Greens' goes home delighted. We shall presently have our charming Goodwood, then Brighton and Lswea; and when those events become bygones, they Bhall be duly notified.

Ten ot the Australian team arrived here safe and sound the 13th instant. Mr Grace, it appears, is bent on committing matrimony 'ere he returns, and the genial Taffyn stays behind to instruct the Tyros of Melbourne at a remunerative wane. Our rival Universities have played their 31st annual match at Lords, which Oxford won. As in their recent boat race, this cricket match was " the conquering game," and tbe Cantabs are hswling at their bad luck in 1864 ; but whilst both sides are so evenly balanced, there can be no reil cause for grumbling. The "Warwickshire X lickerbookers' ' took their traps over to Fiance, and were defeated by the Paris Cricket Olnb ; this event, added to their other achievements on the turf, puts the Frencheis in high glee, but we must see aliout taking thfm down a peg or two. The great Ocean Yncht Race on the 4th instant, was won by Mr H. O. M.»ud>lay's cutter Volaute, and Mr A. Cox's schooner Whirlwind.

A swimming match came off. 6th instant, between Beckwith, of London, and Mather, of Manchester. The Championship and L2OO, worth a struggle, was well contested, but our Cockney crack 'ost the belfc. Distance, two miles between Hammersmith and Putney ; time, 31 mia. 12 sic.

Yankee Coburn and British Mace are to fight in Ireland, 6th October, for a thousand sterling — here's another international sensation ; and as American sympathies are pretty strong in the Sister Isle cousiu Jonathan looks for afair»haie jf " honorable conduct" from the audience, a thing which he says was by no means conspicuous at Farnbro' or Midhurst. The P.R. loses an ornament in Harry Orme, who died the 9th inst., Bged 88 ; he was of the heavy-weight order, '• a twe'.ve-stunner," and licked some good men in his day, but got floored in hia last performance by H. Broome, Esq. ; since when he was known as the respected host of tbe "Jane Shore."

Lord Adolphns Vane Tempest (son of Londonderry's Marquis,) has died at 39. In the House of Commons, this young blood was but a noisy nuisance, and in private life was chiefly remarkable for nefarious turf transactions, and other peccadilloes far too numerous to mention.

Smith O'Brien leaves this world of woe at 61. As the romantic hero of the Ballingarry cabbagegarden in 1848, and as the last Irish agitator he may live in history : but really he was the kindest soul out, a generous friend, a staunch patriot, and a splendid specimen of ai Irish gentleman. Pity that such a worthy (descended from royalty, even from Brian Boru, the famous King oi Munster), who might otherwise have done much good for Erin's Isle, should, in an unguarded moment be misled by " Meaner of the sword" and other desperadoes into so ridiculous a rebellion ; but he paid severely for his weakness, and lived long to repent it -despite all his shortcomings Ireland was justly proud of her chief.

Nathaniel Hawthorne, the American poet, is dead; be was classical and sensitive, and like many of our own celebrities h% charmed his readers whilst himself in bodily torment; his health was delicate, the murderous struegle 'twixt North and South preyed on bis mind, and he died broken-hearted at the melancholy condition of his much beloved country. On the 19th May he was found, like Thackeray, than whom he was but two years older, lifeless ia his be-1. W. J. Fox, for many years the Radical M.P. for Oldham, has died at seventy -eight ; he was one of Coblen's pals in the anti-Corn Law League, and in his timß did good work for the laboring man and his species in general. Sir Edmund Bacon died 30th ult., agel 88 ; the premier Baronet of England ; a descendantn t of the illuatrious Bacon of olden times ; and the owner of considerable house property near Chancery lane. Dr Jaraea Miller, the celebrated Surgeon of Edinburgh, died 17th inst., aged 52 years. The " Young England" left Liverpool 27th uIL for Queensland with 324 emigrants. The Columbus for Aucklani ; the Bellissima for Canterbury ; and the Precursor for Otaajo, recently left - ondon with emigrants on the prin ciple of " assisted passages and free grants of land."

The following ships have arrived, the " Fiery Star," 29th ult., from Queensland, 15th February. The Kent. 7th inst., 93 days out from Melbourne. The Wave of Life, 7th inst., from Melbourne, 6th March. The Westminster, the Benares and the Anglesey, 22nd inst, from Melbourne. The Blackwater and the Ardberg, 23rd inst., from Sydney. The Priie of the Ocean and the Yorkshire, 24th inst., from Melbourne, sth April.

The steamer "Ceylon" with this month's mail broke down, and only arrived on the 23rd inst., but we were long previously alarmed by telegrams announcing serious reverses to General Cameron's troops ; this was denied by Ministers in Parliament, and happily contradicted by the mail, but still the news is far from satisfactory ; onr loss is again ot grievous niagaitude without good results, and the obstinate resistance to our arms foreshadows a long war. It must be clear to all unprejudiced minds that we are not fighting for territory ; also that extermination is wished for by none of us ; but this rising must be put down in the mo*t effectual manner. If the misguided aud ill-advised Maoris will surrender their arms and sweir allegiance to the Queen's authority we shall, as they well know, greet them with the good right lAnd of fellowship ; but for the public weal, and to avoid the possibility of misunderstanding our relative positions hereafter, we cannot now aiford to deal ia half measures ; and any patched up truce would be delusive, if not suicidal* Should more reinforce* ments be required the General will doubtless have already applied for them, and they will be seatultimate victory must not be in question for an instant; for, until the entire native race is con' vinced of the bope'es^ness of contention it is purely visionary to look for submission, and that durable peace, wl'ich can alone bring prosperity to the colony. Altogether, the situation at home and abroad is most melancholy ; what with anxiety for her distant children and the gloomy clouds which lower o'er our house, poor old mother country has oceans of trouble.

Respecting the New Zealand loan the Home Government guarantees one million, out of which we are to be paid about L 400.000 due on former transactions; the remainder of the loan which Mr Wood has asked for is still under discussion.

Transportation has again been mooted, and on the 22nd inst. an Antipodean Deputation had audience with the Secretary. The address was welcomed with official etiquette, and responded to with customary sauvity ; but Card « ell distinctly stated that transportation to Western Australia would be continued on the present system, and he could give no pledge of any departure therefrom.

London, Monday, June 27.

The Qaeen and Royal Family are all well. The Duke of Newcastle has had another relapse and ia in a most critical condition. Win 1., King of Wurteinburg, died on Saturday, aged 83 The English funds hive been " bobbing aroun 1" of late, ranging from 89 to 9 1 : the last quotation is 90,

The eleventh hour has pa«sel, and with it all hope of peace. The armistice is ended, an I the borrid big guns are in all probability again at their dreadful work, for Prussia stiU inaists on her unholy terms, and Denmark will fight to the death. This very night Russell and Palmerston will make knowa the policy of Kugland, aud. peace or war, will take the sense of the country upon it. By their speeches to-night they stand »r fall ; in a few hours we shall know our d om ; and on Wednesday next will be fought the battle of Parliament, but the importance of the present crisis is deep y felt— the language of Ministers, the speeches of Statesmen ; the continued cheer ing in Parliament, the newspaper articles, and the manifest sympathy with Denmark oviticerl by all classes of society, show that the honor of Old England will be upheld by Whigs or Tories as the case may be. Yojr readers will have to wait another mail for the awful news of war, or the agreeable intelligence to the contrary ; but to prepare for the worst becomes us all, and at present there appears no escape from the final arbitrament of the sword.

New York, 15th June.

Grant on the 13th inst. changed his base to Jaraes River, but was opposed by Lee, and heavy firing was heard at Bottom's bridge. God help poor %ant and hia brave followers ; every day's delay is death to thousands ; the road to immortality becomes more effectually blocked ; and "on to Richmond" but a soldier's dream. Gold, 97j premium. Fremont in active canvas for the presidency, and New York in a ferment touching reported military disasters, with their greatest General and their greatest army in the very crisis of their fate.

Shanghai, 7th May.

Gordon with the Imperial troops have thrice assaulted the rebel stronghold at Chang-Chow-Foo, nnd each time have been repulsed with great loss.

The Japanese Ambassadors are suddenly recalled, and as in Giribaldi's recent case, they have to send apologies instead of keeping their numerous engagements ; the cause of this hasty retreat is unexplained, and the latest news from Japan is decidedly pacific ; we only know that these interesting gentlemen signed a Convention confirming all precediogflliaties with France, and then " went their ways rejoicing."

French papers report great successes over their Algerian foes ; they also state that tbe Kearaage is in Cherbourg, and the Emperor demands the release by Captain Winslow of Semmes' crew,

who were rescued from- drowning by the Kearsage's boats ; and that, on the other hand, Winslow demands ev<*ry Alabama man now on French soil to be delivered up to him as prisoners of war. If this be true, our turn comes next, and we shall be puzzled what to do with the Corsair Captain and hit band — " international law 1 ' will again be set in motion, and both England and France may have to bear some ugly words 'from Washington on this knotty point. At present^ there's conflicting evidence whether the vanquished rover struck her colors, or whether tbe flag was accidenta'ly shot down, and we shall not be in a hurry to gratify Federal yeageance and feeil the yard-arm of the conquering Kearsage. But, however the dispute may terminate, N 111. once more shows Southern tendencies which are unmistakeible.

brines Uouzi's visit to Constantinople is reported to have ended satisfactorily to all rarties, and the Principalities difficulty is smoothed over for the hour. Cox well's ballon has just been destroyed at Malvern. No lives lost. NARnow Escape at Niagara Falls.— A change from the prevailing easterly wind to the opposite quarter brought down immense quantities of ice from the lake lately. For the first time, we believe, in the recollection of the "oldest inhabitant," the ice formed a complete dam across the rapid between the bridge and the upper end of Goat Island. With the exception of a few rods in width near the main shere, the rooks below the ice dam were bare. It was safe walking where usually flows an impetuous flood. And yet it was not quite so safe, as was proved on Thursday morning, when several young men wandered over the barren rocks, and visited a boat that had been lodged there for several weeks. While enjoying a walk, which we of this generation may never again hear of being done, the ice dam gave way, and the vast volume of water, probably from five to ten feet deep, came rushing through. The dam soon disappeared, and tiie boat that had remained fixed against the ordinary torrent, was swept away and over the cataract. Of course, there was a hurrying toward the island shore and paper-mill pier. Some escaped with a little wetting and a big scar, while others barely escaped with their lives. A young man named Barlow was obliged to leap from one to ano'her of the ! floating cakes of ice, and fully appreciating the necessity of making land before being carried too near the cataract, lost no time in leaping front the last cake, and swimming_several rods to shore. Those who witnessed the scene describe it as being 1 exceedingly exciting. It all occurred at an early hour in the morning, and hence was seen by but few of our citizens. " Niagara Gazette."

Engagement Between a British Gunboat and Chinese Pirates.'— The chief item of news from Nin po is comprised in the annexed quotation from the " Shanghai Market Report : — " The following account has been given of an engagement which took place between her Britannic Majesty's gunboat Cockchafer and piraticaljunks. It would appear that the Cockchafer left Ningpo on or about the 24-th ult., and proceeded southwards fora cruise. When about 12 miles from Ningpo, the Liberia, a French brig was seen on shore. The Cockchafer weut to her assistance, and found on board, besides her awn men, the crew of the English ship Ella Brache, which had been wrecked on the Matelota Reef. These poir fellows were brought to Ningpo, and the Cockchafer started again on the 26th. On the 28th she arrived at Lamporan passage, where she encountered three piratical junks. As soon as the gunboat hove in sight, the pirates opened fire, and kept up a heavy cannonade, until their largest gun, an 18-pounder, wai dismounted. After tins happened, a brisk fire of musketry was sustained for about an hour, until the junks were boarded. The three junks had from thirty to forty men on board. The largest mounted one 18-pounder, one 9-pounder, four expounders, besides several sjands of rifles, and a large number of d üble- barrelled euns. The prisoners taken confess to having a few months ago captured two Portuguese lorchas and a French schooner in Hangshow Bay, besides a considerable number of trading junks. The French schooner had been laden with arms, and the proof of her capture was found on board one of the junks ia the shape of two thousand bayonets and fifty-two swords.

An Aberdoniais' in a Difficulty.— A Scotchmnn from Aberdeenshire, who was in London as a witness on a Railway Bill, was one afternoon walking through Regent-street, when he felt the desire for enjoying a smoke gaining upon him On examining his pipe, however, he found it choked, so that he had no alternative but to want his smoke, or get his pipe cleared. He determined to adopt the latter, and after looking right and left, he thought of trying his luck in one of those magnificent shops for which Regentstreet is famous. Entering one devoted to silks and satins, he found it filled with fashionable ladies, and after waiting for a few minuter, one of the assistants came up and politely asked him what he could do to serve him, when something like the following colloquy ensued :— "There's a braw day."— "A very fine day, sir; very warm,"— "Ay, it's gey net. Man, ye've a gran' shop here. There's nae tbe like o' this atween Fittie and the back o' beyoat. Keep ye ony tibacca?" — " Sir 1" — " I'm speerin' gin ye keep siccan a thing as tibacca ?"— " I don't know what you mean." — "Dinna ken fat I'm sayin'? I'm needin' a fuff o' my cuttie, that's a."—" I really don't understand you."—" Weel, that blakes a*. Maybe ye wid be sayin' ye dinna understan' me gin I was to spear for the lain o' a preen ?"— "Sir?"— '• Man, ye're a nout. An' this is Lunnan, an' a man canna get twa blows o' his pipe for want o1o 1 a preen?"— And with this the Ab«rdonian left the shop. There was, however, a Scotch shopman present, who had heard the colloquy, and who followed the indignant Aberdonian to the door, where he presented him with a pin, drawing forth the remark that he was glad there was one in the shop who could understand good Queen's English.

A Conscientious Minister.— There is a story of a travelling preacher, whose opinions with regard to horseflesh were quite as ready and orthodox as were the views of scriptural doctrine with which he enlightened his backwoods audiences. This preacher once stopped at the house of a brother of the same faith, who had reared a beautiful colt. Between the two services on Sunday, the two ministers visited the barn of the resident preacher, where the latter introduced his promising colt to his travelling brother. The guest was so much delighted at the fine points of the animal, that he could not restrain himself, and he immediately blurted out the question— " Suppose it were not the Sabbath, Brother S" , now would you trade 1"

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18640827.2.10

Bibliographic details

LONDON., Otago Witness, Issue 665, 27 August 1864

Word Count
9,327

LONDON. Otago Witness, Issue 665, 27 August 1864

Working