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A JAPANESE CINEMA

ENTHUSIASM OF AUDIENCE NO KISSES IN FILMS An interesting description of a visit to a Japanese cinema theatre is given by an English traveller in a recent issue of " Film Weekly." Flaming banners and photographs of Japanese film stars denoted that this was the place I sought, (he wrote). I paid my money and entered, my progress to the seat being accompanied by deep bows from the daintily clad and elaborately coiffured usherettes. Next came a coy little lady bearing an ash tray and matches and a cushion for my greater comfort. By my side were two giggling little dolls, who every now and again cast surreptitious and demure glances in ray direction. The programme was nearing the end of the " comic," in which two Oriental prototypes of Laurel and Hardy were competing for the affections of a lovely geisha. The audience literally screamed with merriment as, while they were indulging in mirthful altercation, another competitor stole her away under their very noses.

Let no one talk to me of inscrutable, unsmiling Japanese. They form the most responsive and vocal audiences in the world. If they are amused they laugh—and they are easily amused—and their laugh is not just a refined gurgle, but a whole-hearted roar. If they are thrilled, an audible shiver runs through the audience.

A newsreel with a Japanese commentary showed the exploits of the representatives of the Land of the Rising Sun in the Olympic Games. This was greeted with extraordinary enthusiasm. The whole aim of Japanese pictures seems to be the glorification of Japan and things Japanese. Never was there a country so intensely nationalistic. The feature picture was the synchronised version of Ben-Hur, from which, as the kiss in Japan is looked upon as a most disgusting affair, most of the love scenes had been eliminated. Ben-Hur's caresses were left to the imagination. Every time the lovers showed signs of offending the Japanese moral code by coming to grips, the referee, in the form of a quick fade-

out, would order them to break away, whiUt the two coy maidens on my left would cover their faces with opened fingers jand give a shocked " chi-chi." 1 soon tired of transatlantic Romans, and wandered forth into the gaily bannered streets in search of more film fare. I entered a second " shinema " for the modest sum of lOsen, about l£d. All the seats being full, I stood at the back and watched a thrilling drama of the Shanghai conflict.

Japan is passing through a period of intense chauvinism, and it is perhaps natural that such a proud and sell-reliant nation should mirror its military prowess upon the screen. An elocutionist who commented on the story was much in evidence, in spite of lengthy Japanese captions. The story, if indeed it can be dignified by'that name, , was of the slightest. Tho main theme was the heroism of the soldiers of Nippon. We then went back to the days of shoguns and samurai in an historical drama. Uur worthy elocutionist had obviously exhausted himself in his previous effort, and the complicated story slowly unfolded itself to a rapidly dwindling audience. With no English captions to guide me, the picture was almost totally incomprehensible, but I gathered that it dealt with the adventures of a lovely " Broken Blossom," whose heart still retained its snow-white purity in spite of her sinister environment, a theme very dear to the Japanese mind. Her handsome lover, sword in hand, after encountering incredible opposition, effects her escape, but dies in her arms. Then the story goes off at another angle with an entirely different set of characters.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19330325.2.169.77.3

Bibliographic details

A JAPANESE CINEMA, New Zealand Herald, Volume LXX, Issue 21450, 25 March 1933, Supplement

Word Count
606

A JAPANESE CINEMA New Zealand Herald, Volume LXX, Issue 21450, 25 March 1933, Supplement

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