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The New-Zealander.

AUCKLAND, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27, 1851. THE PROVINCIVL COUNCIL.

Be just and fear not; Let all the ends thou aim'st at, be thy Country's, Thy Gou's, pnd Truth's.

The return of Mr. Ball for Mongonui, on the 15th instant, closed the elections for the Provincial Council. The following list will show how r the new Council is constituted : Mongonui - - - T. Ball Bay of Islands - - J. Busby, T. Batcman Marsden - - - R. Ross, D. McKenzie, B. Skecn Northern Division - - D. Shcehan, Geo. S. Graham, A. O'Neill, A. Melvin, J. Cadman City of Auckland West - W. C. Daldy, E. King. D Lynch, J. o'Neili, J.' George Citv of Auckland East - W. Rattrav, E. J, Skvrrne M. Oeagh ' Parncll - - - -J. Cheeseman, J. W. Harrop, Newton - - - - 11. Carleton, W. Rowe, Onehunga ... W. Powditch, F. M. p. Brookfield, Pensioner Settlements - R. W. Wvnn, J. Foley R. MeGliee Franklin ... A. Martin, J. Wallace, J. Fanner, G. Gruchy Raglan - - - - W. Buckland, J. May, R. Stewart. The tale of five and thirty members is thus complete. Nearly two-thirds of the members are new men, who have not had seats in any Provincial Council; ten only of those ■who were in the last Council have been returned on this occasion. The infusion of "new blood" has been large, and we think that we are justified in saying, generally, that the property and intelligence of the Province are as fairly represented as in any Council, except the first, -which has been choseu since the Constitution Act came into operation. The rabid opponents of Provincial Institutions point with great glee to the fact that, from the several electoral districts, four-fifths of the members have been returned on a " ticket" avowedly in opposition to the Superintendent, elected just a few days before by a majority of the voters of the whole Province. It is not pretended, so far at least as we are aware, that the political principles of the opposition " platform" are different from those held by the Superintendent; on the contrary, putting aside the very stale electioneering devices about " accounts" and " illegal expenditure," we have heard no other argument used against the re-election of Mr. Williamson than this one, viz., that having been twice before chosen Superintendent of the Province, somebody else—no matter how small his fitness —should be elected instead, just for the sake of change. The Electors of Auckland, however, did not take that view T of the question, and we believe that when the present agitation shall have had time to subside, and the Provincial Council is summoned for the despatch of business, it will be found that the cant of the bust trigs has not been imported into the Council Chamber, and that the majority will not neglect the interest of their constituents and the welfare of the Province, either for the sake of personal opposition to the Superintendent, or in obedience to senseless clamour out of doors. The usual fierce determination to discover mare's nests will, of course, be displayed by some of the old hands; and there may, not improbably, be another hunt after the " empty chest;" but when the steam has been blown off by the legitimate funnels, we have ourselves no doubt that the Council will get down to its work, and that that work will be well and quickly done. The balance of power between the Council on the one hand, and the Superintendent on the other, has been redressed by the Audit Act; in practice now, as well as in theory, the power of the purse will be in the hands of the Council, and the Superintendent will be saved from a vast deal of the often irresistible pressure, and consequent responsibility to which he has been heretofore exposed. But it will be remembered that that responsibility will be transferred to the Council itself, and that it is only by the exereise of good sense and sound judgment on its part, in dealing with matters of finance, that the necessity for frequent and sudden convocations of the local Legislature can be avoided, or the public business be conducted satisfactorily to the representatives, or beneficially for the people. This Province is passiug now through a critical period in its developement; a te* months even may make a vast change m j» prospects for the future. Although it may w true that the local Council or the local Government have no direct power of influencing events upon which so much depends, yet 1 certain that by their joint action, «J directed, the hands of the Governor and otttw General Government may be greatly strength ened, the opening up of the country promoted, immigration be renewed, "progress" in its best and truest sense made the order of the day.

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Bibliographic details

The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27, 1851. THE PROVINCIVL COUNCIL., New Zealander, Volume XVII, Issue 1629, 27 November 1861

Word Count
786

The New-Zealander. AUCKLAND, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27, 1851. THE PROVINCIVL COUNCIL. New Zealander, Volume XVII, Issue 1629, 27 November 1861

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