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THE NOMINATION,

The nomination of candidates for the representation of tilt) Waii an Electoral District took place m tbe Court House ou Thursday, tbe lat inst. . Xl a little past twelve o'clock the Returning Officer, Mr W. Stuart, R.M., look his sent on the Bench and naving explained the object for which the meeting had been convened, read the writ for tbe election and called up-in any person present who hid a candidate t'> bring forward to propose him. Mr Ward amidst applause sti-pped forward. He said the electors bad met to perform x most important duty — they had to decide upon the best man to represent them m Parliament. He would lay at the first that he doubted whether they woul>l hive such a man as he would have .hem have. Kegretted that many were influenced uot liy the great question*, but by the pa'try party feeling which existed m the place. Ho hoped they would drop that and support the man who would make their belt representative. He had,, toy. propose their eld and tried member Mr Seymour, He was talking about Mr Seymour the other day, to a person m the town, a jolly landlord who happened to be m high feather. He could not. aay this trail was under the influence of beer, but he was influenced by beer. (Laughter.) This man aske* him what Mr Seymour had done. He than Talked him what he had not done ? That question' non-classed his rampant adversary, A very , vagaa notion prevailed of what a member could do. Some complained because time was wasted with long speeches, und others were coudemned became they made ihort on.» or none at till. They should avoid those glib speukers who sai 1 much and Raid nothing. He alluded to. the arduous duties entailed on a metnbi r of the House and thought that if they had anything like a fair representative they were fortunate. Talking was not as a rule tbe way to settle business. A business man sits down quietly aud thinks, talking and thinking were two different matters. Mr Seymour had done one rooßt important thing, he had supported the Hall Government, (Applause.) He did not say fio. Hall Government were perfectly rigor, m all they did, nor did he agree with them m everything. Mr Saunders whom he brought forward as a clever and honest man approved of thorn. He did not agree with Mr Seymour m all points, but that was natural, but he bud faitb m his honesty and truthfulness. He did not wish to bg personal but could not avoid being such m a combat like $bo. present They should say "can we trust this man to do certain work?" but of mo'e eminence was it to have a truthful and honest man He vpoul4sh.ow that m these respects opposite candidate is tqtqjjy unfit. (Hisses and Uproar.) Mr Podsijn flip othpr night had delivered a beaut'fu} sermqn qu p«rsqnatyies, but his wholo address was one mass ot personalities. He made a display of paper to make them believo he had been hard at work. Then he talked figures. "Jibs tjgiires wore correct, but the adding up was wrong .(laugher).. Tbe speech was nothing b»* a rehash of ■" Hansard." One question he would like to ask— where was Hendeison? Would Henderson have given them such a hash-up ? Dodson said all taifes wsfss l) a 4- When the Laud Tax was passed he talked $)™i up the big estate?. He talked agijust fh'o lirqperty Tax ana all taxes as far as ho could make out. Tha audi«nco would not heir him (Mr Ward) on thnt occasion, or he would have asked what he vynuld >1n to moot the demands upon the coi)u{,cy, T||o'y must b,e pfiopiretl for more taxation, mure ccopQiny, aid mure retrenchmo&t, In another tpaljty Mr Dodsou was seriously deficient, namely, aiinpk honesty of purpose. Mr Dodson, at the Imt olffitjon, to Bervo a turn and purpose, showed he could fcttH £ dpljberate lio. He pointed it out, and apologised! Thon 5Qe hoa he treated Henderson. (O.immo'ioD, aud ories o£ f.'Eead the letter» m the paper.") He had been treaftheroqv to hi« friend. (Cries of " How about Moorhouse," andappjause.) He would «ay Mr Dodaon's action wa§ traiiiroijs. Since thei) one of Mr Dodsop's moat active gupporters, not satisfied with having helped io thn arrangement, abuacs Mr Hendor*on, and <aU9tim a TOBSB man. Tfe« Cact mat, Wj

Henderson was ready enough to Btand. It was said that it was because the Corrupt Practices Bill was passed ; before it had been heart disease. One other point to show how the wind was blowing, and bow shamefully Mr Henderson had been treate 1. There was Mr James Sinclair, that fine straightforward man, who would lend himself to no treachery. Mr Jame3 Sinclair's heart was not altered m »ny way nor his head. He was true to hia colors, and refused to sanotion by his support the treachery of Mr Dodaou to Mr Henderson.

Mr James Sintlair, m stentorian tones, and amidst tremendous cheeriug, said, " You ara ■wrong ! You are wrong !") Mr Sinclair then stood up m tho body of the room, and addressing Mr Ward, said, " You are utterly wrong. Mr Henderson withdrew voluntarily from the contiMt. He requea-ed Mr Dodson to come forward, and he does so with my conseut. Mr Ward, you are utterly wrong,"

The scene is indcxcrihable » everyi ne m the Court was on their feet, and Mr Sinclair's manly refutation of Mr Ward'B assertions was received with deafening cheers, and every manifetatiun of applause. Mr Ward, ou quiet lieing restored, S3id he knew Mr Sinclair's word was correct, and he must apologise. He was wrong not m a fact but man inference. The imposition of the Property Tax. had caused him to discharge two of bis men. His interests were the same as those of the working men. He was once a working man himself, and all bis sons and niphew i were working men. In Mr Seymour they wonld find an honest and truthful man, and he commenced him to the electors, and hoped to see him returned (applause). Mr Paul seconded Mr Seymour's nomination. He asked the electors to support a Liberal man who snpported a Liberal Government. ■ If they would do that they would go on and prosper. Mr Alfred Li tch field came forward amidat applause. He said he stood up with very reluctance, firstly on accouot of 'his; inability, to properly follow Mr Ward and | -Mr Paul, and partly because he feared he was nut able to do justice to the cause he had m hind. After coming into the room and hearing the speeches, he had fejt somewhat strengthened, and conceived it a very curious and absurd notion to find that there was no better advocate of Mr Dodson than Mr Ward (laughter). Th»y had heard a good deal about wh;it Mr Seymour hid done, and he was willing to grant that he had done something, but he did not prove he had done as much as a better man could have done. He dwelt on the fate of an old worn-out broom, which when it is no longer able to do its work well is placed on ODe side and a better one taken. In going about tho country a person often seea some old reaping machine, or other piece of agricultural machinery which has seen iti day. . Some one came forward with a new patent capable of doing the work better, and the old machine was put away. So it was with them ; a man had come forward who was capable of doing their work, and the time had arrived to send it man to the House of Representatives to do better work than their member during the last 1 1 years (loud applause). They were told that it was a fine thing that Mr Seymour had stuck to the Governmeut. Tbat might be, but this he knew that the members of the Hall Government appeared to be the same, though they had different names under different leaders, as those who had manipulated the country during the past 11 yeirs, and brought it into its present fix (applause). The prominent members of the Hall Government were the prominent members of the Atkinson Government, which had preceded Grey's administration, and brought the affairs of tho Colony into the muddle they were now m. He had pleasure it nominating Mr Henry Dodson as a fit and proper person to represent the district m Parliament (loud appkuse.) Mr Campbell, who was loudly applauded on rising, said, — At the last election I had the horrnr n ' '■>-">-"■"! " i rv- 'iHiti for >he House vi j.1.,/. 1...V-.*... ..tii. JiVr so doing, for so using my privilege as a British subject, I was held up to ridicule by the " Times." and branded as a "pothouse politician" (loud applause). This little paper still continues a lingering existence (laughter), and although it must have internal evidence of its own fast approaching dissolution {loud laughter), still 'persists iti its course of rueannesj and depravity (loud appl uue and laughter). Newspapers may be compared to what Sir George Grey said concerning Clubs, that they partake continuously of the characters of the individuals' who founded them (loud applouae). We all know who are the founders of the "Times," and therefore need not be m the least surprised with the low and grovelling nature of its productions (loud and deafening applause). I have now to recommend to you a plain and liberal- minded man to watch your best interests m Parliament? I will not revert to the main enterprises of a public and private nature of a beneficial character to this district, of which Mr Dod■on has been the promoter, I cannot, however, pass over an occurrence of very reoent date, namely, the purification of the Borough Schools (loud applause). Is it not a fact, gentlemen, that the people of this district have ha I 'O tight year by year, and inch by inch, undjr Mr Dodson's leadership, to redeem our education?! interests? Who were your opponents? Mr Seymour's little taqal organ and Mr Seymour's par isites (tremendous applause). It was they who maintained, defended, and glorifie 1 ij tho corruption (renewed applause). Gentlemen, men rfith families, is it not a fast that ohiMren attending school for four or five years could not a:iy their alphabet, and other children ■who knew a little, forgot m. the meantime what they had previously learnt (hear. hear). I say if Messrs Dodson and Henders.m had done no othar publig servjoe for the district, for this alone they deserve our everlasting gratitude (loud applause). By Mr Dodson's perseverance and indomuiitable courage, we now enjoy an immunity from floods, and I i consider ho has done more for thii district than al} the B,nard qf Conservators put together, and he did UQfc levy any tax (applause) i I would say a few words ou another subject, j John Tucker .Robinson and a few others, put themselves up as criffyKM m Education. They may be critique.-!, and they may npt.be. They do not like Mr Dodsou's pronunciation and, hi§ grammar. It is too pUio for them (applause). ij ew Zealand has had more experience of educated apQ3 trjan ar.y other country m tho world (laughter). We want men witii brains, with plain coaimorf sense and basin ;ss habits to legislate for us (apphusu). Gentlemen, ou outside casual glanc.!} at the two candidates will convince you How niggaw'y I^att^re has been to tho one ani how bounteous, to the ether, (loud and continued applau?n). I have very great pleasuro m seconding the unur'mtionof Mr Henry Dodson, and I feel curtaiu lia •nil be returned at the head of the poll (treinuudous appli'uej, Air Soymoiir, who wa? applauded ou vising, said, — It fails on uu-, as the old mo nher, to address you first. I do not agree with the propfiipr of Mr Dodson iv his simile about the old broom, I do Dot oonsidsr myself woru out as a nolitiail marj. 4' my tiiiju of jife a nj-in is no|; wopu Qut J «1« not vyish to mako any lengthy gpegglj. I'ut must take this oppuituuity of referring to one or two matters, bcoausc this is tho first opportunity I have had of addressing yon iv answer to what has dropped from my opponent. Mr [ Doc'son's speech <jn Tuesday last was a long i one,' but the'rfe 'was littto'in it. (A voicu ; 1 More than you couli make, anyhow.) (Laughter au<l applause.) The principal parts were occupied with serious mi (representations (cries of No ! facts, facts!) and unfair insinuations on tny put conduct. I will

refer to the remark about my not calling you together because the last number of " Hansard " was not published. It cannot ba supposed that a member can bring away m his head every one of say 150 o Id Act< a.id 300 divisions m Committee, and I 'hink '" Hansard oii^ht to be iv the hands of everyone before the member address 8 them. With respect to the land tax. I hive been misunderstood, and it his produced a letter from so able a lawyer as Mr Robert Stout I say I was misunderstood. I admit my explanation was not suffi.jientiy clear (laughter). I eaid the Lan-I Tax was based on acreage, ond I did not b iffi:ieatly bring oo r a parti wanted to show that valuable land m a town was nottixe I m its (lr.epr pirt on, and that tho Laud Tax fell most Heavily on | the land least alile to hear it. I think itwi* because I omitted t> mention thn £500 »x---emption that 1 wae mismnderstno't. Mr Stout says he kuows of acres taxed at £30,000, there may be s>mn like these. I remember m the old days M.r Sinclair used to pay the greater part of the rates m Blenheim. In the sub-division of land into small areas, the towns were practically exempt. Mr Dodson said I would tax every man's land, evtn to his quarter acre. I distinctly deny that. • It is totally incorrect (So ! no !). I said I was m favor of exenr pting to £300, and believe it is fairer than the £500 exemp tion. At present, though there were 66,000 freeholders m the Colony, only 22,000 paid uuder the Property Tax. The Tax should reach a greater number. A good deil has been said about the Dog Tax Amendment I was asked the other day why I s;ave my amendment to Mr A. S. Collins. The clause I drafted was a distinct exemption. Afterwards Mr Shanks' motion, leaving power of exempting dogß from the tax to Road Boards, was carried. In voting against that Mr Collins no doubt thought the one I gave him to be the best. Mr Dodson saiJ it was with great difficulty I could be got to act m the matter of the Shearing Reserve. He thinks it wrong to sell it. You should bear m mind tint the reserve is one made with a view to enabling the people up country to shear their sheep on, there being no means whatever of traffic further up country on their own land. It was used for this purpose for many years, and certainly could not have been taken away. What use was it kejpmg the reserve, an area of 13.000 acres shut up. It would only become a perfect rabbit warren. (A Voice : "How about Meadowbank." Loud laughtar.") Not only did I require iio urging, but I brouaht the matter to the notice of the Road Board first, and I did so because I thought it necessary to consult the local body before introducing any measure for dealing with tho reserve. They asked me to do it, and I say I did the best that could be done. It is better to settle the land instead of letting it lie waste. Mr Dodson claimed tho credit for tho preßent railway line. It is an absurd assertion. The present line is, the original line laid out m the iarly days. ' The oilier was an alternative line. Mr Dodsou has entirely changed front on Education Nations; ago he attacked me for voting for Curtis' amend, ment. I have not changed ; but now he goes m for denominationalism. I am certaiu it won't answer m this country. How can we split up our smaller schools. Mr Dodson says I shut up the Nelson Bchola'ships for private schools. When I went to Nelson I found that the Government had set apirt four scholarships for competition amongst the public schools m Nelson, and I got them to givfl us two scholarships as our share. They did so. That is how the scholarships were got. They were paid out of the public funds and so were only open to public schools. Mr Dodson said I bail added Kaikoura to this district m the Representation Bill. I give that a distinut deuial j it is absolutely untrue (applause). From the first day 1 lieard of i'I set my face against it, and 1 wr- te a letter to a newspaper contradicting it. I felt that the Wairau waa m every way entitled to a member. I know Kaikoura was added m the first draft of the Bill. I went with Mr Suunders and objected to it, and the Ministers left us as we were. Mr Dou>on says I struck a blow at the froedom of discussion by my ruling at the close of the stonewalling. 1 wish you had been present to see how time was being wasted with stuff that had no beiring on the question at issue. All I diil was to tell them to ko back and not stray away from the clause* of the Bill. Ho dis putes my assertion about the cost of stonewilling, I repeat it aaain and stand by it. I find, on consideration, that the cost was more than I stated. See what work had to be loft undone, and how many bills had to be thrown over, which would otherwise have .been diucussed and dealt with. Tbe cost of Parliament exceeds £43,000, an average of £608 a day, the obstruction lasted 15 days, aud therefore coat £9 OQO, . I maintain that the Grey Government auticipated the £5.000,000 loan to the extent of £3,000.000. (Mr Saymour here read for the Financial Statement of|lß7B m support of bis statement.) I did not say it was spent, but only that it was anticipated by contracts, etc. that the Grey Government had engaged m before the Loan was raise! One of these contracts was the.railway Jet by Mr McAodrew m Otago, the money to be paid, two years after the contract was accepted. (Mr Seymour read an extract from the Financial Statement, 1881.) The Government had thus effected great savings. Mr Dodson was trying to make you believe that we can get on without further taxation. Wuat an idea ! Were we going, then, to repudiate 1 (A roioe ; Economise. ) No, I would never consent to that. I would never consent to resource being had to the whitewash bucket We must face the difficulty and pay our debts. I will add that m the course of his spsech Mr Dodson made a most uncalled for and base insinuation aga'nst the officers of volunteers (Roars of derisive laughter}. I see it ia not reported m bis speech, which does not appear ts me to be the one he delivered. It was entirely unjust: the officers of a volunteer corps could not make wrongful nst) of the grant because the volunteers theraaolvea had the management of it. The task of criticising my opponent's speech is not a pleasant one. Ido not intend to Bay more at present. I will conclude by saying thit the Vernon. contract has been let (applause). It ban been industriously circulated for some time past that the extension to the Awatere IB a shsntj— to help ii}e mmy election. It is let for £4000. lam pleased it is let at so low a figure, and I -will urge' upon Government to let another piece of the work to the extent of the vots. lam content to leave tha matter m your hands, and am confident the result will bs satisfactory (applause). 1 Mr Bodsqn, \vho was warmly applauded, siiid: I have to thank Mr Ward lor his ad dress, and the straightforward, fair, and honest manner ia which he has made definite charges against me. I'or a long time past Mr Seymour's paper (the " Times ") has been indulging }tj vague generalities, such as ; " Our cauJidate should bo it nmtj of irreproachable character — honest and intelligent — and, above all. pure m hia private life." When we inquire what they mean, they very easily answer, "So he should be." (L (tighter.) J'he s^ine thing can be said of you, Mr Chairman, or the Bishop of Canterbury. We all iigree overyone should possess such character-" istioa. But Me Ward, unlike ago of his newfound frienda, gets bohind a wall and strike? blows, a3 he once boasted he would do, without anyone knowing from wl ence they came. Mr ■\yard: had the courage of his opiniooß, and now openly spates that <ja one pi;cat>ion I told a deliberate lie at Renwick, and was made to apologise for it at Grove Town. The facts of the case are simply theso :— At a meeting at I'eitwick during tha last contest Mr Goulter.

speaking asiainst Mr Henderson, said he (Mr Henderson) was not a producer and employed no labor, and Mr Goulter ended by saying no one had ever received a penny of his money. Replying to this I said that Mr Henderson was better than a producer, a consumer — n, class that was very much needed m this district ; that he was not m the way of employing much labor, but he did employ some, and I was quite sure he owed no man a day's wages. I found on enquiry afterwards that thi- was absolutely true, mil Mr G^ulter chose to take it to himself, and at Grove Town made it a caunt of o.npl.iint. ">fot wishing to hurt anyone"s fe«liu(ss, and not wishing to hurt Mr Goulter' s, lat once s.iul I regretted if, m the heat of debate I had said anything that would grate harshly on Mr Goulter's feelings. I had no intention of doing so, and could not see why Air Goulter shonld fit the cap so closely on himself— (applause)— and 1 apologised. Mow, I had never mentioned Mr Goultei's name. You nejd nut take my word for that ; iit wus all reported at tbe time. Really I had j only said what was true of Mr Henderson. If Mr Ward thinks it was untrue, I leave him to settle it with Mr Henderson. (Loud laugbter and applause.) Mr Ward is an old, greyheaded, and venerable gentleman, and should know better than to make such absurdly false accusations — (applause)— which that history Mr Ward is so fond of quoting and referring to, will prove to be untrue. Mr Ward then, m a most ungentlemanly and wanton manner, brought Mr Henderson m conflict with the meeting. Why should Mr Henderson's name m particular be imported into the contest? Have I not an equal right with him ? Have you pot each cne of you an equal right to come forward if you wNh ? Has anyone a special right over another ? Speaking for myself I feel I have a claim on the district, ariaing from long years of service m various capacities, extending over a quarter of a century. Is it that, having arrived at my time of life, with leisure at my disposal, and being m a thoroughly independent position, that I, of all others, should be considered to commit a crime because, at the request of my fellowsettlers I offer myself as a candidate to represent you? (Applause.) I do so besause' l believe I think I am competent, and I think I possess certain business qualities totally deficient mMr Seymour. (Applause.) Also because no better man has offered, and, further, I have a perfect right to do so, (Loud applause ) Mr vVard says I jumped Mr Henderson's position, and am a traitor to an old friend. Mr Henderson never said so. He cannot ; so I hurl baok mMr Ward's teeth the foul aspersion. (Prolonged applause.) No manhad a better friend than Mr Henderson had m me. (Loud applause.) My wish to see 'him m Parliament amounted to a passion, for I kcew him to be a quiet, intelligent, and well-intentioned man, who would reflect credit on" the district, and because Mr Seymour and ' his -satellites^ Mr Ward worst of the lot — had houndel h|m down for years.. (Applause.) , Who doaa not remember Mr Ward's indiscreet speech at Renwick during the last contest, m which he accused Mr Henderson of being worse than a Maungatapu murderer. (Tremendous applause.) Then again, some of the Seymourites accused him, m their organ, of being " an impostor and a liar." (Applause.) From these scandalous accusations I defended him then, and will ever do so. (Applause.) Until Mr Henderson absolutely retire 1 1 ntvar consented to stand. (Applause.) I came forward reluctantly, and I never announced myself until long after Mr Henderson's return from Christchurch. I say mMr Henderson's presence that tins is absolutely true. (Loud applause.) His published letters and hi 3 private letters amply prove it, and my letters to him, if he will produce them, prove it still more. (Loud applause.) Mr Ward has said that we warn thinkers, not talkers. I have yet to learn that a man who can put hi 3 thoughts together, think them out, and" clearly express them m becoming language, is not preferable to anyone who, like Mr Seymour, is either unable to think or talk. (Applause.) I thin!; I am unlike Mr Ward : I have the discretion when to speak and when to be silent. (Applause.) I will leave Mr Seymour's explanations about the Land Tax until I see them m print, but a more lame and impotent conclusion than that he drew I never heard (applause), and it has taken him four years to understand Mr Curtis' amendment. Two years ago he snid he supported it to open schools m outlying districts. I challenged the statement at the time, and told him he coald not open outside schools under it, buc niuat do so under another clause of the Education Act, and that he veted for it for the reason he now admitted ho did, though at the time he had not the courage. to say so. [Mr Seymour: That is what I did.] The reports of both newspapers prove that lam right m this conolusiou. [Mr Seymour: It is reported m "Hansard."] It is not so reported jn " Hansard." (Applause.) Mr Seymour said he supported it to open outside schools, and " Hansard" will prove I am right and Mr Seymour wrong. (Applause.) Mr Seymour says I made a distinct charge against him of having added Kaikoura to this district m the first draft of the Repress itatiin Bill. My proof Js based qn Mr Saunilers' pubho speeches, m which he said that no district had been, altered without the Government first consulting the .member of that district. He said he was consulted, and Mr Seymour Bays he went with Mr Saunders about it." But, after all, Mr Seymour may not have been consulted, I think it very probable he was not, for if there is one thing nore unlikely tl)an another it is that Ministers should consult Mr Seymour, (Loud applause.) When a Minister seeks advice he goes to some one capable of giving it. (Loud laughter and renewed appkuw.) My Seymoat has again been, indulging m his peculiar arithmetic, and says the Government has effected great savings. We have heard a good deal about this Government effecting " zaelnyis.." Hqw are these "savings" made up? Why they put votes on the estimates one year— the Clarence Bridge, for instance— don't spend the monej , and the next year say they have saved it. (Laughter and applause.) In 1579 they put L 13,000 on for the liai Valley Road, spent L2OB, and ( l saved,'' the rest. (Loud applause.) Why didn't they put on a few millions while they were about it, and then their " savings" next year would be enormous. Mr Seymour referred to the loan, and again said the Grey Goveinment had spent nearly the whole of it. I proved the other night, from the last Pu>lic -Works Statement, delivered m August last, that the expenditure from loan on public works m 1879 was over L 1,700,000, m 18S0 L 1,900,000,, 900,000, and there remained on March la3t L 1,800,000 to be spent this year. This makes L 5,500,000 of the loan Mr Seymour says the Groy Government spent. God ljelp h.is arithmetic ! (Loud laughter and applause..) " I could say ranch m favor of having as our representative a man living m the district. My j feelings are so strong on this head that I would really accept a very incliffercit member from the locality than go outside. (Applause.) Mr Ward has accused^ me of being a traitor. I 'never wa3 a traitor m my 'life, or untrue to a friend (loud applause and laughter). Mr Henderson ami I stood by Mr Ward m his contest with Mr Moorhonse (heap, h°ai), and fqught hard for him,. Then Mr V{at<\ had only honied words. Mr Dodsou was then a' good settler,'' ''a flood speaker,' 1 ami "n good friend." Ami all this wholesale flattery was lavished upon me as long as I stood behind and worked for him, Buc is Sir Dodson changed ? (Cries of No ! No 1) I was the same then as now, I never change, I nor abandon au old friend. ( 1 ,oud applause, ) You can prove nothing against me, but I tell you Mr Ward himself is tile traitor tv Mr Headewou (applause) aud I will, now prov*

it. (Continued applause.) We pat Mr Warrl m Parliament. He went contrary to ■ he wishes of the party who put him m over the Abolition Bill. We know thatßpbinann was boasting that they had "Old Joey" now, A'nl knowing the danger to the party of Mr Ward's course, Mr Henderson aud I wmt over t> Wellington to remonstrate wi.h him biu failed to accomplish our purpose. Mr War.) took his own course, and at the next contest it was out of our power to run him successfully The party met at Mr Eecles' office, Mr Ward was present and it was decided that he should g.7 for Kaikoura, and htj eilhsr named Mr Henderson or myself for the district. I then Baid to Mr Ward "Lft U3 understand each other, wilt the party that work for you stand snoulder to shoulder and work for Mr Henderson." Mr Ward Baid " Yes, certainly." We then agreed to run Mr Q«n(lers"u, and at once apportioned to each hia work m the cauvasa. I took Spring Creole and thp next day saw Joseph Redwood atd my b> other and enlisted them m the cause. Be it known to Mr Joseph tted wood's lasting credit, he was true to hia word. Mr Ward saw Mr Henderson a few days after and said he would hold off for a time. He kept us m a string no one knowing li.iw he would go, until just prior to the election when we all met at Eenwicktbwn, Mr Ward said " I can't go for you Mr Henderson, I am going to support Mr i Seymour." Njw this was a cruel blow to iMr Henderson. Ha hal just risen from a > bed of sickness and was very weak. He had fougbt the contest on true lines and he severely felt this treaeherrous conduct from one who professed to be his friend, and whom he had been mainly instrumental m phcing m Parliament. (Lnud appause.) Mr Ward said he would make sniiuuocetuent on the platform at Renwick, and I was told off to reply and express our regrets, because it was though I uonld do so m a becoming manner. Mr Ward said ho regretted living to go against Mr Henderson but ailded he would not hurt him, yet the next day we fonnd him canvassing bis very utmost ami m his usual indiscreet manner. Mr Henderson was very nearly- crushed by Mr Ward's treachery, and yet now Mr Ward gets up and talks about trators. (Tremendous applause.) I have only now to say that them is not one wor.l of truth in.the state, tnents that I wanted to oustlMr Henderson. If I wanted the seat I could have had it at the last election. Some time before the election Mr Henderson sent for me and m the presence of his secretary, Mr R. D. Nosworthy, begged me to take up the contest, as he was unable to stand the worry. But I said, 'I No, I will not agree to that/ If you are : finable to work you must stay at home, and we will fight it out m your name," (Loud applause.) Mr Seymour read a telegram, ■ showing that the Vernon contract is let. I am pleased this iB to, and I hope to be able to see the rest of the vote spent. This is but a small portion of what we are entitled to. We should have L 400.000 to have anything like our proper share of public money. Mr Seymour has not told us how he arrives at the conclusion that L 16,000 is our proper share/. I know it is much. more. We are liable, as our 'portion of the publio debt of the colony, to over L6O each one of us. Our wives and children ivre liable for the same amount. This is arrived at on a population basisvand by the same basis we are entitled to LiOO.OOO. On a population basis we are two per cent of the oolony. _ If we take an aoreige basis we are three per cent, and should be entitled to L 3 out of every LIOO of loan for we are liable for that amount of the debt of the colony, bo matter where the money is expended. (Applause.) We have been kept back, by the inability of our member to obtain our proper share of public money. He, however, hag has taken care to get his LSOO per year out of the funds of the colony, and that haa teen the price of his vote. (Applause.) Two. years ago I tcld Air Seyineur, m his office m Wellington, m the presence of Captain Kenny, that the Ministry would remain m office until the end of the Parliament, and had I been there I would like Mr Saunders, have taken care they did no mischief, but would have kept them m power, a3 the least of two evils. Thera were not the materials m the late Hoise to form a strong Ministry. Then there was this further trouble, there stood the old man Grey— " the old roan eloquent " — who was a power that really kept the- Ministry m offioe, butaaa leader was a huge mistake. He could by hia power of speech charm the House, but his imagination alwsys runs riot with him when he rises he sees nothing before him but ■some charming Utopia filled with stalwart youths made hardy with the pursuit of the dew he could see browsing on our mountain tops with mailens full of grace, and little children beaming with health and happiness. (Laughter.) Tbis is all very well to listen to as pretty figures of speech. I have an immense aimiration for him, but such admiration aaone may feel for" Professor Tyndall aud other gifted men whom wo know by reputation. When Sir George comes down from this to the everyday affairs of life we find him as uufit to ; govern " as Mr Seymour himself, (Loud applause.) Mr Stuart called for a show of hands, which he declared to he m Mr Dodson's favor. The announcement was received with, repeated cheers. The proceedings terminated with a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer.

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THE NOMINATION,, Marlborough Express, Volume XVI, Issue 281, 2 December 1881

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6,047

THE NOMINATION, Marlborough Express, Volume XVI, Issue 281, 2 December 1881

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