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The Lyttelton Times.

January 7, 1854. During the recess of our Provincial 'Legislature, which has for a time set our minds free from the discussion of political r.nd social questions of general concern to the Avhole Province, it is natural that we should be occupied with such as more directly affect the prosperity of particular localities. The situation of the Capital town of this Province in reference to a regular and abundant supply of fuel, appears to be a question of this sort. When we look around us we find that from Fliccarton a very limited quantity only can be obtained. In another direction, Papanui shews, by the light which appears in various places through its diminished trunks, the heavy demands made,[upon its remaining .stores. To this we must add that it pi*oduces hardly any fuel of a more valuable quality than white pine. Hoon Hay presents difficulties of situation and distance, which appear likely, for some time, to diminish the benefits which its spirited proprietor would otherwise confer upon us. Nor must we forget that, in the present wretched state of the roads, a few days of wet weather may at any time stop the communication altogether between any or all of these sources of supply and the Capital. Were there no other resource, the case thus stated would, we confess, be a serious one; as it is, however, we trust that the difficulties in obtaining wood for fuel will but hasten the adoption of measures for obtaining a regular supply of a far superior description of fuel, and one not subject to be rapidly exhausted like wood. We allude of course to making available the abunda^W stores of coal which are so opportunely^ placed not far from us. For carrying out this enterprise, perhaps no individual amongst us hns as yet the requisite means ; but we conceive that here is a case in which a combination of small capitalists might, particularly if assisted by public credit, confer a great boon upon the Settlement at the same time that they advanced their own

I interests. Were a few persons to join in pro- . curing- a few drays and bullocks, keeping two or three men at work at the locality ■which might be selected as most favourable fin raising a stock of-the mineral joufficient Ito keep the drays constantly supplied, the practicability of using the fuel, and its qualities, would speedily be tested. Were this first attempt successful, we should then recommend the formation of a public Company for perfecting the means of transport, and for extending the working of the coal which would thus be accessible. On the manner of accomplishing this, we shall hope to offer' a few suggestions on a future occasion.

Under the head of English news in another portion of our issue will be found extracts from the London papers of Sep. 14. We regret, to-Jobserve that the probability of a war with Russia appears greatly increased; the Russian Autocrat having refused to accept the Turkish modification of the Note drawn up by the four powers. In addition to the fears of a war, the Cholera has again broken out, and at London, Liverpool, and Newcastle, several have fallen victims to it. We are compelled to defer our remarks 'on Mr. Godley's speech till next week.

On Sunday last, between the hours of 1 and 2 p.m., Mr. Wtxliam Henry Morris, midshipman, of the" Carnatic/'^vhile sailing on the^bay in one of that ship's cutters, during a sudden squall from the S.W., was accidentally knocked overboard and drowned. Although observed in the water by the Captain, who with the mate and the doctor were in another of the ship's boats only a short distance from the place where the accident happened, and who immediately pulled towards him, the unfortunate gentleman was not seen again ; nor has his body been discovered, although every search has been made by the ship's boats round the coast. The following is.Captain Snart's deposition before the Resident Magistrate : — *•' While shortening sail in a squall, in a ship's boat, I heard Mr. Way, midshipman, call out to me, ' Mr. Morris is overboard,' and on looking astern, I saw him about three boats' lengths from the boat. We instantly dowsed .mast and sail, and endeavoured to pull her head round to the spot, which we reached some minutes afterwards, and remained upon for some time ; but he had disappeared. Previously to this, and Jhe moment we knew he was overboard, both Mr. Way and myself called out to the doctor, who was in the boat, to throw over the life, buoy, which he did at once ; but it blew away from him, and we did not see him afterwards. The deceased was before the mainsail, which he was attempting "to brail up. None of those in the boat saw him fall overboard, nor am I aware how the accident happened." ODDFELLOWsmr.—The members of the City of Norwich Lodge, M.U., celebrated their anniversary at the Canterbury Hotel, on Thursday, Dec 22nd. At 7 o'clock the members and their friends sat down to partake of a most excellent dinner, provided by host Davis. The cloth having been removed, the following toasts were proposed: " The Queen; Prince Albert and Royal Family ; Governor Grey ; His Honor the Superintendent of the Canterbury Province ; the G.M., Duputy G.M., and Board of Directors of the M.U. ; the N.G., and Offi»fe« of the City of Norwich Lodge ; the .^3-Tity of Christchurch Lodge ; prosperity to the Masons and Foresters of New Zealand ;" together with many other appropriate toasts, each toast being followed with a song. JlkvSldknx iMagisxkatk's Opfick, Jan. o, liSs4.— Charles Mood, Jamas Thompson Grant, •Joseph Williams, seamen, were sentenced to 12 weeks' imprisonment, with hard hibour, for . refusing duly un bmirci llie Cavnatic,

Ceicket.—As before, the single gentlemen have been victorious in the return match with the married, played on Monday. last; and this time decisively : the game being won in one innings with sixteen runs to spare. The married men going in first, scored 63, and the single men 112 in the firsf innings. On the second, the former added to their score only 35, rendering it needless for the bachelors to follow. At the conclusion of the match, the score paper exhibited the following result:— MAEIUED. Ist. 2nd. J. Longden, b. Bowen, c. Ward . 0 not out 9 C..1. Perceval, b. Cr. Bowen .. ..1 b. Cr. Bowon .. .. 1 A. Moore, b. Blakiston 9 b. Blakiston .... 1 J.Brittan,b. Blakiston 16 run ont ........ 1 J. Townsend, b. Cr. Bowen 6 b- Blakiston, .... 2 W. G. Brittan, b. Blakiston .. ..4 b. Blakisn, c. Boys 0 H. Sewell, b. Cr. 80wen...... 17 b. Cr. Bowen .... 2 C. B. Fooks, b. Blakiston 0 b. Blakiston .... 3 C. Simeon, b. Blakiston, c. Read 4 b. Cr. Bowon .... 0 J. C. Boys,not out 0 b. Cr. Bowen - ... 5 A. C. Croft, b. Blakißton 0 b. Cr. Bowen .... 2 Byes, 2, Widu 4, ... 6 Byes, 6, Wide 3, 9 63 35 SINGLE. — Quin, ran out TO C. Blakißton, b. Boys, c. Croft - - 30 C. Ward, b. Croft ..... 2 Cr. Bowen, run out 23 S. Field, b. Croft 3 J. C. Porter, b. Croft 15 J. Cotterill, b. Croft .... 0 C. C. Bowen, b. Croft .... 3 James Boys, b. Longden - 12 W. C. Lawrence, b. Croft ... 0 H. W. Read, not out - ... 0 Byes, 13 Wide 11 - - 24 Total - - - 112 A plain luncheon was provided on the ground by Mr. Hart, of the White Hart Inn ; and an additional subscription of the members of the Club was entered into for the purpose of completing the clubhouse. The game, finished by five o'clock, though short and conclusive, so little damped the courage of the losers, that they have challenged the bachelors to meet them again, after the return match between Christchurch and Kaiapoi shall have come off. We are glad to observe the large diminution in the number of wides and byes scored on either side, and hope that the practice which has produced this alteration may not be neglected during the present fine weather, which we cannot expect to last for ever. Pigeojt Bay.—Last Tuesday was celebrated by people here as a fete day. The sports commenced by a rowing match, and although the number of boats was less than expected, owing to those from the port and east or' Pigeon Bay not coming forward, still the race was one of the best that we have seen. The " Waterlily," — Mr. Frank Sinclair, —took the first prize, the whaleboat " Betty," belonging to Isaiah the Maori, taking the 2nd. The distance was three miles. In the foot-race, the first prize was taken by Richmond, a native from Otago, and the second by Hart, a Pigeon Bay native. Another excellent foot-race was run by six Maori women. The first prize was cleverly won by Lucy, and Mrs. Isaiah took the second. There were also sack races and other sports, to which pi-izes were given, and the whole concluded by native songs, and a war-dance, The day was fine, every one present seeming to enjoy themselves. John M. Plutcheson, Esq., acted as Judge ; and after the sports a large party sat down to an excellent dinner provided by Mr. Knowles.

To the Editor of the Lytteltan Times. Sir, —When I stated ia my letter of the 17th ult. that the present Trespass-Ordinance was a great hindrance to the progress, of agriculture, I stated that which, from enquiry, I found generally ascribed to be the cause ; however, as the l" Land, and Cattle Owner" cannot admit a statement proved by facts, I cannot reasonably expect him to believe the assertion of an anonymous writer. Determined to maintain a character for

perversity, he defends the existing Ordinance with great zeal, and after long and laborious efforts to do so, he concludes that, " We do want an equitable and distinct trespass law," thereby admitting the injustice of the present [one. However, h? could not well arrive at any other conclusion; for in his endeavour to show the advantages of it, he has, I must confess, pointed out in a more forcible manner than I could have done, the injustice of it. He speaks of two occupations on which the " life and progress of the settlement depends —land tilling, and stock-farming." The farmer seeks a profit from land in his possession, and the labour he bestows on it; the stock-owner seeks the same from a run, (for the time his property,) and the care he bestows on his cattle by himself, or his agents ; they are generally under careful supervision, and therefore not so liable, even in runsjnear Christchurch, of committing damage. In runs far removed, of course a trespass Bill, however stringent, would not affect them. But unfortunately, there is another class —men who wish to have the same advantage as the stockowner without going to the same trouble or expense, either in procuring proper feed for their cattle, or exercising any supervision over them : for distinction's sake we will call them Cattle Owners. I have been informed of several instances where these men, cultivating every inch of ground they possess, keep a number of cattle either for produce or draft, without an acre of feed. The consequence is, they must turn them out on the next unoccupied section or sections, which has been pretty well fed off before. The cattle naturally seek the best feed, which they probably find on some luckless neighbour's property, whose crops they tread down and devour ; and if his fence should be an inch or two below the prescribed standard (which, from the natural decay of the fences generally in. use, is most likely to be the case), he shall not be able to obtain one farthing damages, and the Cattle Owner is not liable to be fined for his covetousness and negligence. No one would be selfish enough to seek to deprive them of the privilege of turning their cattle on these "invaluable pasturages," but let them be compelled to yard them by night and tend them by day; if they obtain feed for nothing, they surely cannot grudge a little expense in doing this. It appears, as tile law now stands, one party is put to great expense for the convenience and benefit of the other. That a measure to remedy this in justice should be carried as soon as the Council met again, was what I endeavoured to urge ; their neglect in not doing so before from press of business was pardonable. We have their promise that such a measure shall be introduced. It will be, I am sure, equally beneficial to the farmer and stockowner; the only cks? it will affect will be those who not only wish to derive a profit from their cattle, but endeavour to procure it at the risk and expense of others. I remain, yours &c, A Timer of the Soil.

To the Editor of the Lijttelton l^imcs. Sik, —Some of your readers will perhaps be interested to learn that the first set of Partridge eggs, laid by the birds now in my possession at Christchurch, were hatched on Tuesday last, having been set under a common hen. There have been hatched six birds, which at present, are all strong and thriving well. Two other hens are now sitting on sixteen more eggs, and the two parent hen-partridges continue to lay regularly every other day. It may therefore inhoped that the-;e is now a fair prospect i>i" the introduction of partridges into New Zealand. I have the honour to be. Sir, Your obedient Servant, W. G. ISi.UT-r.4Xv Christchurcli, J;in. 5, ISo-t.

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Bibliographic details

The Lyttelton Times., Lyttelton Times, Volume IV, Issue 157, 7 January 1854

Word Count
2,271

The Lyttelton Times. Lyttelton Times, Volume IV, Issue 157, 7 January 1854

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