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CHRISTCHURCH.

[From our Correspondent.] On Friday, the sth instant, Mr. Theodore Williams died very suddenly at-Riccavtjn. The cause of his death was a disease of the heart to which he had long heen subject. Mr. Williams had undertaken the agency of Mr. Deane's estates, during his visit to England. On Tuesday his remiins were followed to the Cemetery by a large concourse of mourners, including 'five of the clergymen resident in the district, and several of the deceased's fellowpassengers in the "Randolph," besides other friends, and most of the labourers employed on the farm. Late on Saturday evening, intelligence was received that a serious accident had occurred to Mr. Tancred, at Hoinebush, Mr. Deans's cattlestation, at the Malvern Hills. It appears that Mr. Tancred's horse became restive while he was mounting, and kicked his riuht leg so violently as to break it above the ankle. Although Hoin'ebush is about :)0 miles off, and the night was cloudy, Dr. Barker started off on horseback at half-past 8 p.m., with Mr. Deans's stockman for a guide. Dr. Barker returned on Tuesday morning, and described Mr. Trancred as doingwell. This morning lie again started, with a light four-wheeled chaise, in order to bring Mr. Tancred home, if possible, either in the chaise or in a litter borne by four men. A Subscription has been set on foot by the Rev. O. Maihias, for the purpose of raisingfunds to.assist in the expence of throwing a Foot Bridge across the Avon, at the Bricks; this bridge will be found of much benefit, not only to the inhabitants of either side of that part of the river, but will lessen the distance and afford a better road to the Cemetery: it is contemplated, we hear, at some future time, to build a small Chapel in the Cemetery for the performance of the burial service, and to make it sufficiently large to accommodate the population of the East end of Christchurch on both sides of the river, for Divine service on Sundays. A Cricket Match is to come off on Wednes-. day next between the C.C.C. and Working Men's Club, this match is looked forward to with some interest; at the last match the Working Men were beat, but which it would appear is not to be the case upon this occasion, if we may judge from their apparent determination.

In accordance with the invitation given in your last paper but one, I venture to offer yon, from time to time, some notice of Christchureh and the neighbouring country. In so doing, I bear in mind that you wish to furnish intelligence to your readers out of the settlement as well as in it; and I hope therefore to be forgiven if I now and then mention things perfectly familiar to dwellers on the spot. It is about 12 months since the first of the colonists from England came to dwell on these plains ; and it appears not out of place to record the progress which has been made since that period. In March of last year, there were but a few tents and temporary buildings on the site of the town ; and the only cultivation in the neighbourhood consisted of some 30 or 40 acres on Messrs. Deans's farm at Riccarton. There were two ways to the port; either by boat, over Sumner Bar, and up the Avon, to the landingplace called "the Bricks; 3' or along a rough bridle-track over the hills and round their northern foot, and across a temporary bridge over the Heathcote river. The completion of a cart-road from Oliristchurch to Heathcote Ferry, and of a bridle-road thence to Lyttelton, with the establishment of a large punt at the Ferry, rendered the journey easy, as well as much shorter, to pedestrians, horsemen, and cattle ; while it was also found that the Heathcote had deep water for vessels which could not ascend the Avon, up to Christchureh quay, within three miles by the road from the Market-place. These improvements in the means of traffic soon produced a visible effect upon the progress of Christchureh and the adjoining country. Another short piece of road enabled the colonists to procure timber and firewood from that part of Riccarton wood, about 30 acres in extent, the timber of which had been reserved for public use. Now, there are about 140 buildings of one kind or another in the town, almost all made of wood. Some of them are of tolerable size, such as the Land-office, the School-house, used temporarily as a church, the Golden Fleece, Royal and White Hart Inns, Smart's Boarding-house, the eight-stall stable at Christchureh Mews, and the residences of Mr. Biittan, Mr. Phillips, Dr. Barker, Mr. Rose, Mr. Brown, and Captain Westenra. There is also a small, but neat parsonage, near the temporary church. There are two medical men in regular practice, besides two others employed occasionally. There are two solicitors, qualified to practice in the Supreme Court; and two or three architects, surveyors, and engineers. There are two butchers, two bakers, two blacksmiths, a gun-maker and tin-smith, three general stores or shops, two carpenter's workshops, each employing several hands, two shoe-makers, a saddler and harness-maker, a wheelwright, and a. lime-burner. One of the storekeepers, although not holding any regular appointment from the Post-office, brings" the letters of those who authorise him to do so from Lyttelton. Numerous gardens in and near the town already furnish an abundant supply of vegetables; a large dairy establishment supplies milk, and butler is brought in from neighbouring farms. Fish is brought in a hand-cart from Heathcote ferry nearly every other day : the principal sorts are moJti, eels, herrings, and flounders. Fuel has hitherto been obtained from Riccarton wood, but that source is nearly exhausted, and bullock-drays now draw firewood from Papanui Wood, the communication with which lias been rendered comparatively easy by means of a cart-bridge over the Avon at the Marketplace, and the partial making of the North-road. It would be very desirable that an effort should be made to complete all the difficult parts of this road as far as the wood before the winter sets in, or those who shall not have laid in a sufficient stock of fuel during the dry weather will probably have to pay an exorbitant price. The price now varies from" 21s. to 245. per cord, according to the quality of the wood, 7s. being the price in the wood, and the remainder the cost of cartage. While on the subject of fuel, it may be interesting to know that a fire was made' at the Land Office a few days ago with Selwyn coal in a grate, and that it burned nil day with a brisk flame and without any disagreeable smell, thoroughly wanning the large surveyor's room. It would perhaps answer the purpose of some individual to work one of the seams on a small scale, so that those who had a cart unemployed might send to the pit with a certainty of not being delayed in loading. Three day's work of a team would probably then bring

in a ton of coal, while, during the winter, unless the road be made good, the same three day s work will hardly bring in more than three cords of firewood from Papanui. The worker of the coal might also burn lime, as there is limestone of excellent quality on the same spot. At present very inferior shell lime, at 2s. or 2s. 6d. per bushel, is all that can be procured here. On week days, the centre of business here is the Land Office. Besides the more immediate business of that office, there are visitors to the two rooms in which about 1,200 volumes of the library of the future college have been placed. These' visitors subscribe, a guinea a year each, and are entitled to the use of a similar room at Lyttelton, in which other volumes are placed. In both these rooms, Wellington, Lyttelton,and Sydney papers are taken, and occasionally papers from other places are presented by subscribers. Just now these rooms derive additional interest from the deposition in them of some 30 or 40 geological specimens from the carboniferous strata of the Selwyn valley, collected for the Association by Mr." Cridland, their surveyor of Public Works. One of the rooms is also used as a Court by the magistrates. The residentmagistrate, Captain Simeon, attended by the Clerk of the Bench, holds his Court here, and grants summonses, every Saturday ; and in case of emergency, two or three of the unpaid justices attend and transact business on other days. There are two constables stationed in the town, but there is neither lock-up, police-station, nor any other Government building. Sunday is, generally speaking, well observed ■. a large bell, hung temporarily a few feet from the ground, is heard 4 or 5 miles off with a fair wind; it is the tenor of a peal of bells, which are to be eventually sent hither, and thus its tone reminds one of" an English country church far better than the tinkling bells hitherto heard in New Zealand. The temporary church, which will hold 250 persons, is crowded for the morning service, and tolerably well filled for those of the afternoon and evening. There is a really good organ, and a handsome font in the building. The present incumbent is the Rev. 0. Mathias, one of the Commissaries of tbe Bishop. He is often assisted by the Rev. J. Wilson and the Rev. W. W. Willock, who reside on their farms near the old bridge on the Heathcote; and also by the Rev. H. Jacobs, who resides at the parsonage, and is to take charge of the Grammar School which is to be shortly built. About 80 children attend the day school; about — the Sunday school. The environs of the town display, perhaps, a greater degree of progress than Christchurch itself. I ventured to say that, certainly in no other part of New Zealand, and probably in no other new settlement in the world,has so much good work been done within so short a space of time, (To he continued.)

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18520313.2.9

Bibliographic details

CHRISTCHURCH., Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 62, 13 March 1852

Word Count
1,691

CHRISTCHURCH. Lyttelton Times, Volume II, Issue 62, 13 March 1852

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