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WHAT WOOL CAN DO

PARADE OF MODEL GOWNS

DANCE AT THE EXHIBITION

At a very successful dance at the Exhibition Cabaret last night, an unusual and very interesting feature was a mannequin parade, displaying advance 1940 creations of the leading Continental and London couture houses which comprised many attractive gowns and sports wear. The models and most of their accessories, .were made entirely of wool, in many new and very beautiful fabrics and colouring.

The dance was well attended, and many of the guests realised, perhaps for the first time, the loveliness of the new woollen materials, which included sheer voiles in wool, wool lame with golden sheen, vivid floral voiles, and delaines of silken effect, wool taffetas, and the finest of wool laces. Posies and floral trimmings, too, were of wool origin, and many most original ideas and designs were effected, the results being both charming and beautiful.

Many of the models shown were creations by Schiaparelli, Lydia Moss, Motley, and Digby Morton, and other famous fashion artists.

Mr. H, M. Christie, chairman of the New Zealand wool council, welcomed the guests, and said that there were similar wool councils in Australia, South Africa, and London, for the advancement and display of the wool industry generally. They were organising a- publicity campaign throughout the world, and although the war had interfered with work in Europe, the councils continued to carry on elsewhere.

. The parade .was arranged by Mrs. Ina Allen', who was also the commentator. She said the show, which she described as a "treat," proved how wool could be translated into fashion. It was remarkable, she said, how, through scientific research, manufacturers had been able to produce such beautiful and sheer woollen fabrics. She also thanked'ail those who had assisted and the management of the cabaret.

The mannequins, five well-known Wellington girls who showed the creations to advantage, were Misses Pat* ricia Luckie, Joan Hawley, Marie Melville, Joy Allen, and Jean Hinton. Two little girls, Joyce and Joan Leek, displayed children's frocks and sports wear. STRIKING SPORTS WEAR. Among the sports wear, a striking outfit consisted of vividly coloured patchwork shorts worn with a petunia red and white patterned blouse. A Dak suit, with checked coat of burgundy and blue, blue daks (long trousers), and a striped shirt to tone was new. and a tailored cruise suit of white flannel, with navy sweater and beret, was very smart. For beach wear the latest Continental style shown included short royal blue shorts, a long-sleeved cream blouse, and bright pink bow tie, and long burgundy socks worn with white shoes. BEAUTIFUL TAILORED SUITS. Tailored suits included one of a large rug check coat in blues and tan shades worn with a blue skirt, and smart sailor hat of wool. A long coat of mulberry coloured wool, trimmed with grey natural wool on revers and scarf, was worn with a red "military" hat. Another, beautifully cut, was of London tan, worn with tan wool flowers on lapel, and with scarf, hat, and gloves of vivid green. A fine grey glen check coat and frock was smart, the black hat being trimmed with a blue wool "feather," A very chic French tailored suit was shown. The coat had a large rug check in blue and tan colourings, and was worn with a blue skirt, and a smart sailor hat of wool. WOOLLEN BRIDAL GOWN, Frocks for the late afternoon in vividly patterned sheer wools, of beautiful colourings and a peasant cocktail frock were shown, also evening gowns, some with full-length cloaks of contrasting colours which hung with featherweight effect and were perfectly cut. House coats, pyjamas, nightgowns, and negligees were also displayed of sheer wools or wool taffetas, and finally, a bridal gown of fine .white wool lace, with gloves and flowered headdress of red. The bridesmaids' frocks, full length, were in a riot of colour and cut in old world design. Miss Valeric Hickie gave a humorous monologue, in costume, and Miss; Joan Hawley sang "Parlez Moij D'Amour." During the parade a mufi- j cal accompaniment was provided by! Manuel Raymond's orchestra, which also played for the dancing which followed. AMONG THE GUESTS, , . ? Among those' present were Mr. H. M, Christie, chairman of the /New Zealand Wool Council, and the following members of the council:—Messrs, H, D. Aeland (Christchurch), J. McLean (Hawke's Bay),.andF.C f . Warren. (Canterbury), the Hon r and Mrs, Peter Fraser, Captain Lord Dormer, Mr. and Mrs. T. C A. Hislop, \%e Hon. P. Webb, Madame Arnaud, Mrs. Eric Nash, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Cotterill (Christchurch), Mr. and Mrs. Ivan: Wood (Christchurch), Lady Roberts, Mr. G. H. Meadmore, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Purrell, Mrs. H- D. Aqiand (Christchurch). Mr. and Mrs. C, ''fV Hainsworth, Mr. E. Lusk. Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Rawlinson, Mrs. McLean, Mrs. Knox Gilmer, Mr. and Mrs. F. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Beham, Mr. A-. E. and Miss Dorm, Mr, and Mrs. G. Bassant, Mr. and Mrs. Spears, Mr. [and Mrs. A. P. O'Shea, Mr. and Mrs. McLenan, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mabin,

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Ogilvie, Mr. and Mrs. G. Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. W. Myers, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Hawley, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. A. Chartres, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe, Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Barnett, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Staples, Mr. and Mrs. C. Turrell, Mr. and Mrs. Prevost, Mr. and Mrs. N. Charteris, Mrs. F. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. S. Clements, Mr. and Mr 3. C. G. Collins, the Hon. and Mrs. Mason, Mr. and Mrs. Grimstone, Mr. and Mrs. S. Fernanders, Mr. arid Mrs. Barton Ginger, Mr. and Mrs. E.. D. Good, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hawley, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Hardcastle, Dr. and Mrs. Nash, Mr. and Mrs. H. Richards, Mr. and Mrs. Farquharson, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Staples, Mr. and Mrs. L. Lefeaux, Mrs. Lewer, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Bown, Mr. and Mrs. Clement Cook,, Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Rennie, Misses M. Rodie, M. BritonSmith, L. Jackson, I. McLennan, Horton, F. Penney, V. Carr, Hickie, Silver, J. Knox Gilmer, Spiller, M. Arlow, J. Russell, J. Connelly, S. Arlow, E. Louisson,, I. Spidey, M. Brown, K. Hickie, J. Conolly, Williamson, Campbell (2), and Messrs. P. J. R. Fordham, H. Beauchamp, Curtis, F. W. G. Hoddinott, S. Toogood, J, Gillon, L. Arlow, D. Morpeth, Q. Barnett, S. Vinsen, M. Stewart, L. Lipson, G. Gollett, H. Wright, J. Roberts, E. Harrison, L. Bullott, D. McCormack, G. H. Meadmore, J. Howard, J. McCormack,. A. Glennig, A. Pratt, H. Thomas, and W. Kerrs (Invercargill).

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19400111.2.135.3

Bibliographic details

WHAT WOOL CAN DO, Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 9, 11 January 1940

Word Count
1,102

WHAT WOOL CAN DO Evening Post, Volume CXXIX, Issue 9, 11 January 1940

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