Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

RACING NEWS

(BY "VEDETTE")

NOTES AND COMMENTS

REED'S CASE

The judicial stewards of the Canterbury Jockey Club aroused a storm of criticism, constitutional and otherwise, when it was made known that they had suspended R. Reed for three months for interference in the concluding race of the Grand National Meeting. Beed appealed to the Canterbury District Committee, and. that body has reduced the punishment to suspension to 31st August, Reed will thus miss three days of the racing, a moro consistent punishment than that originally imposed. The whole affair may now be commented upon with fairness to everybody.

It is absurd for anyone who was on the grandstands at Riccarton to assert' definitely that Beed was entirely innocent or otherwise,' for the alleged, offence occurred in the first furlong on the straight six-furlong course. It is understood that the chief witness against Beed was the steward at the start, but his evidence, if not altogether unsupported by riders in the race, was nearly bo. It is agreed that riders are very loth to bear witness against their confreres, so that their evidence has to be marked down 1 in value to some extent. However, the fact remains that the committee has seen fit to reduce the sentence, which, compared with_ E. Ludlow's case, was out of all proportion. Ludlow's mount seriously interfered with two horsea in the'concluding part of the race —and to some extent spoiled their chances, but that is by the way—yet he was suspended for only a little more than one day. Had Ludlow been stooddown for three months, no doubt little ■would, have been heard of the case of Reed.

The occurrence is most regrettable, and was due, no doubt, to hasty -judgment. The last race at Biccarton provided no little trouble, owing to the short weight of Hall Mark's rider and his subsequent disqualification. Beed's case was rushed through afterwards in a hurried manner. It was submitted that if the stewards had adjourned the case until the' following Monday, when its merite could have been deliberated on calmly, the honorary officials would have saved themselves no little loss of prestige. The caae may be used to drive another nail in the coffin of the system of honorary stewards. Competent stipendiary officials would not have been guilty of such a gl&ring case of inconsistency.

Nominations for the OtaM Maori Spring Meeting close on Friday. Weights for Wanganui are not due until after the Marton .Spring Meeting. New Zealand Cup weights are due tomorrow.

Nominations for the Dannevirke Racing Club and Hunt Club Meetings close to-morrow night, at 9 o'clock-

Bonhorame, who showed such promising form in the spring of last year, only to go wrong, oas ijeen nominated for the middle distance hack races at the Wanganui Meeting. Bonhorame is a four-year-old half-brother by Panmure to Client.

Names, of South Island horses axe conspicuous by their absence from the nomination list for the Wanganui Spring Meeting. Centrepiece can be regarded as a very unlikely runner in the Guineas.

Trentham stables are represented at the Wanganui Meeting with Nadarlno, Minotua, Star Banger. Indian Sage, Quiescent, Tresham, Ilka., Note, and Spade. Added to these are the horse 3 being trained at Wanganui temporarily by T. F. Quinlivan and B. O'Donnell, all of whom have been freely engaged.

At the annual meeting of the Stratford Baring Club, the president, Mr. Sidney Fitt, commented on the action of Parliament in fixing the minimum weight to be carried by horses. The speaker deprecated such action and considered that the conduct of racing should be left in the hands of the clubs.

The annual report of the Stratford Racing Club showed a profit for the year of £2465. Stakes had been increased by £500, £435 had been spent on upkeep of buildings, and £1630 on the tract In all £8400 had been expended in four years on the race track, all of which had come out of the club's revenue. The track was now completed, and the club should next turn its attention towards erecting adequate buildings.

Mr. Sol. Green's imported chestnut Verbius (Swynford—Eippolyte), who had been backed in an earnest way for the Caulfield Cup during the week opened at 6's for the August Welter at Flemineton on 15th August, firmed, and, though I the stable is alleged to have put £2000 on him, ended at almost his original price. Always well up and never extended, he was three-quarters of a length in front of the improving Ouragan and Linlithgow at the close. He reached the front in a few strides and it was a rather taking Caulfield Cup trial, though the distance was only a mile and the ■time (Imin 41isec) was nothing to write home about. There were eighteen runnors, mostly of a fairly good class, comments an Australian exchange. Saucy Sue had to be withdrawn from the Eclipse Stakes consequent on heel trouble. It is to be hoped that this I proves nothing serious, for it will'bethe I general wiah that the crack filly is fit jto do herself justice in her trial against /the colta in the St. Leger on 9th September.

During the wet weather Haze Had an easy time, writee "Pilot." In consequence, he is bigger than when ho arrived from New Zealand, but his trainer can be relied on not to allow him to go too far in that direction. B. J. Mason does not believe in being too easy with his horses, but he has the happy knack of being able to give them sufficient,' without overdoing them. Recently I heard a Randwick trainer remark: "Yes, Mason gives his horsea plenty of fast work, but you never see them .'all out at the finish, and that is why they' stand it." There is probably a deal m that, too.

Commenting on the recent Bosehill Meeting, the Sydney "Bulletin" concludes : —"But a number of Bosehill runners may be expected to show rapid improvement. They were merely out for an airing.'" Much the same will apply at a North Island fixture not a long distance, ahead.

jWdey Reed was Warned by some writers in Australia for being 1-ca.ien on Franco* Trt'.ssady at Fleniington reoontly. Francis Tressady had 9.9 up, however, ami went uiulfr only by a head lo I'eiiyariu, 7.3, the ten furlongs being run iji 2min 7^60. Pengario and Frances Ti'cssady led into the straight on terms, and fought out the finish, according to the Sydney "Referee," so that it was difficult to understand why Reed should lie charged with taking; matters easily and being "pipped on the post." Reed was beaten also mi Swift on the .sii-nip i\»y.

The lesprvlivo merits of Heroic, Spoiirfclf, iiini Wijidb.-is arc iilrrticly being <lir>aif!:-'.cJ in Australia. In the opinion of "Pilyf," .Winding is the best, for he has proved himself at home 111 siuht-fcr-a^B race* or liiUidkapi.

he possesses also the necessary dash to take a good position at any stage of a race. Heroic would lose caste a little by his failure to beat either Whittier or The Night Patrol in the Williamstown Stakes (one mile) at Caulfleld last Saturday.

Apparently since the Labour Government took over in New South Wales there has been a suggestion of a Board of Control to bo established by the politicians to .take charge of racing matters. The A.J.C. controls racing in New South Wales, and has brought it to the high standard of the present day. If the A.J.C. was made subordinate to. a Government Board, with the latter's attendant wirepulling, there 15 no doubt that tho standard of racing would deteriorate. New Zealand at the present time is threatened with a similar menace, for some disgruntled individuals have sufficient influence to stir up trouble through the agency of a few but noiay politicians. Although it appeared in a New Zealand exchange that G. Jones was coming to Sydney to train solely for Mr. C. W. L. Murchison, the latter assured me the other day there was nothing in the report, writes "Pilot." It arose through Jones writing to Mr. Murchison, asking him to make inquiries, concerning stables which were advertised for sale. Mr. Murchißon did advise Jones that it he came to Sydney he would give him ' a horse to train, but as the stables referred to were sold recently to Sydney buyers, Jones, if he oomes to Sydney at all, will not do so under any definite arrangement; Regarding Manfred, who is the A.J.C. Derby favourite, "Cardigan" writes:—"l went out to M'Calman's stables at Plemington recently to have a look at his team, and I must say that they all reflect the greatest credit on him. Manfred, of course, is the pride of the stable, and is as carefully tended as if he were a prince of royal blood. It is the .general impression that he has thickened and grown a good deal, but, while I think he certainly has thickened and if possible lengthened, I doubt whether he has grown very much. Still, as he measures about 16 hands, it is not necessary for him to get any taller. He is a beautiful colt in every way, and looks ready to commence a strenuous Derby preparation. He is very deep in the girth, and he has a tremendous rein." Manfred, at forlorn odds, was a runner with 9,4 in the Three-Year-Old Handicap at Flemington on 15th August, finishing fourth.

Mr. Dudley William Gibson, who formerly held a position as stipendiary steward with the Australian Jockey Club, died at Cabragabal Station, near Grenfell, New South Wales, ou Friday, 14th August. The late Mr. Gibson was an enthusiastic polo player, and captained the Sydney team in the last Dudley Cup tournament. He was also a member of the Royal Sydney] Golf Club. On a recent visit to the city he contracted a severe cold, and developed pneumonia on his return home. He was 50 years of age.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19250827.2.127

Bibliographic details

RACING NEWS, Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 50, 27 August 1925

Word Count
1,649

RACING NEWS Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 50, 27 August 1925

Working