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THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Tuesday, May 14, 1861.

LUOLO NON UEO "If Ih>r\el)cen extinguished, ict theieme, A thousand beicons from the spaik I bore.

No one, we believe, ever expected great results from negotiations with the natives south of Taranaki, and events are every day occm ting cleaily pioving that if the peace of New Zealand is to be restoied, natives late in aims against the Government, who are unwilling to accept most indulgent and meiciful terms, must be dealt with according to theii deseits. The Ngatiruanuis aie apparently anxious for more bloodshed and plunder. They have turned back the Wanganui mail, threatened to destroy the next one sent down, and lefused to allow Europeans or European stock to pass through theii district. Undei these circumstances, the futuie of the Province of Taranalu is gloomy in the extieme. The settlers are natuially unwilling to invest time, labour, and capital in a counti y open, at any moment, to a (Southern laid , and, though many of their families have already returned from Nelson, we fear grectly, that if the present state of things continues long, the} r will have only gained the piivilege of companionship in misfoilime by their letmn home. New Plymouth must lemain a mere military position till peace is established on some secure and permanent basis , and no such peace will be the result of negociations or fighting at Taianaki. This has been long patent to eveiybody acquainted with the natives We have ourselves often urged it, and pointed to the Waikato as the centre of opposition to Biitish rule, and a peiusal of late Southern files must convince every body that it is so. Day by day it becomes inoic and more evident that the King has adherents far and wide. A movement which, if wisely directed in its mfancy, might have been poweful for good, has become po-neiful for evil. The Southern rebels are desirous to range themselves under the King flag, for the purpose of seeming Waikato allies , and an alliance, offensive and defensive, appeals to have been made, in consequence, between the tiibes to the North and South of New Plymouth. The King flag is a convenient 1 allying point. Tiibal distinctions and old tiibal jealousies are forgotten in a league against the Pakeha. Ng.itiruanui muiderers and plundereis aie to be received into the band of " United Maoris," and their evil deeds are to be foi gotten in consideration of their joining it. The teims offeied by Government have been refused, because Southern natives feel, that in promising allegiance to the King, they have secured to themselves protection against the Queen ; they feel that they aie ( backed up in Waikato, and that a blow stiuck at them to the South would be the signal foi a countei-blow by their allies in the North. Undei these cirenmstances negociations become useless and hesitation and piociastination can only serve to strengthen the handb of those in arms against us. Taranaki is ruined for the time being, and our tioops have been wisely withdrawn fiom a position where they could only have spent the winter m mounting guard over mins. Confidence can never be restoied till the King flag has ceased to wave in New Zealand ; and till that time ai rives Taranaki will be no place for Euiopean settleis. As we write, tioops are pouring into the countiy : with what object nobody knows. Auckland, it appears, is to be their head quarters ; but we anticipate no fight in the streets of Auckland, nor yet in the vicinity of Otahuhu, where a force is being concentrated. Ib it intended to make a mere demonstration of physical force, or is it intended to strike a blow 1 Natives mu&t be asking tho question as well as Europeans. Government seems to be tin owing down the gauntlet, but not till all other means of settling the present difficulty

have been tried. Our present attitude in refer ence to the natives can only mean this — unless New Zealand is being made use of merely for ulterior Imperial purposes in the Southern Seas — namely, that the British Government is determined to see no rival flag on New Zealand soil.

In the last number of the " New Zealander" there appeared a letter from the Eev. S. Wil&luns, of Te Atite, commenting upon an official iMtef addressed by Mr. McLean to His ExcelTOicy the Governor, dated Ist Dec, 1860. It reviews the whole question of the origin of the War j gives us arguments and alleges facts. With the arguments we have but little to do. We have had them ad nauseam, and fallacious arguments refute themselves best if left alone ; but some few so-called facts, mentioned by Mr. Williams, do call for comment. Premising that t\e Rev. Gentlemen appears to think that all the operations of the Land Purchase Department have been conducted with a total want of principle, and an utter disregaid to the wishes or rights of the natives, we shall proceed to make one quotation from Ms letter. He says : The Waipureku purchase on the noith bank of the Tukituki, not more than eight miles from the town of Napier, was made by Mr. McLenn from one individual, in opposition to "the wish of the rest of the owners, and nearly cost the seller his life. , Now the writer might have taken the trouble of ascertaining the facts of the case, before making such an assertion as the above. Had he done so, he would never have made it. We have too high an opinion of Mr. Williams to believe that he would wilfully make a false statement, and have no doubt that he has been trusting to mere hearsay. Had he enquired in the proper quarter he would have found that theWaipu^ reku block, containing 175 acres, was sold by Te Moananui (one of the principal chiefs of Hawke's Bay), Karauria Tupu, Te Waka Kawatini, and Hakaraia, all of whose names were attached to the deed of cession, in the presence of European and native witnesses. We might make several more quotations, but when a gentleman is guilty of so flagrant a mistake in reference to matters where his local and personal knowledge and experience ought to serve Trim in better stead, it is unnecessary to pursue the subject further. We must confess, however, to a feeling of some surprise that Mr. Williams should now conceive himself called upon to make an attack upon public officers in reference to proceedings to which at the time they were being carried out he not only took no exception, but, according to his own showing, professed to give his cordial support. Tempora mutantur ct iws mutamur iv Hits. Times have changed since the purchase of the Waipureku block, in May, 1555, and a remarkable change has taken place in men's minds since. With all deference to the cloth, it may be said, sub tonmrd, that the cloven foot has here and there peeped out of late. We are accustomed to seeing it, and look for it, but it would be much more candid in Mr. Williams, and those who entertain similar views, to come forward boldly, and let us know really what they mean. The war, so far, has not been overwhelmingly successful : we know tLis, and many clerical gentlemen know it likewise, and grow bold in consequence. Why cannot they tell us, once for all, that they are opposed to the extension of English settlement, and meet us as open opponents ! Why have they been half aiding the Government in carrying out measures which it is plain now, in spite of any attempt at concealment, are totally repugnant to their own ideas of what is right and wrong. Mr. Williams' advocacy in the same letter of the cause of Archdeacon Hadfield is somewhat unfoitunate, as it certainly convicts him of an incorrect statement in reference to his holding pej^mmunication with the natives during the of his illness at Wellington, while the gentleman now admits that such communication did take place, and that a native made use of the Archdeacon's name in urging the Manawatu natives not to sell their land ; an admission, however, which he qualifies by representing that the native misunderstood the reverend gentleman's meaning. The more this matter is enquired into the more evident does it become to every candid enquirer that a very general sympathy exists amongst missionaries with the anti land-selling league, or rather the anti-colonization movement. Te Aute and Waikanae appear to agree upon this point, and have already expressed themselves.

Nfws from t.e South — By the steamer "Tasmanian Staid," which arrived in the Manukau last Saturday afternoon, from New Plymouth, we have files of the Southern newspapers. The intelligence from Marlboiough and Wellington is uninteresting. In another column will be found extracts from the " Taranaki Heiald" and " Wanganui Chronicle," which will be read with interest. In addition to the general deta'Js contained in those extracts, we append the following letter, which give 3 currency to a particular fact that may be of some consequence in considering the reliance we ought to place in the good faith of natives when we next treat with them :—: — "THE MAORI PLUNDER. " To the Editor of the Taranaki Herald. "Sir, — Allow me through the medium of your columns to enquire of your numeious readers if any of them can inform me why thel conditions of peace granted to Hapurona and the Ngatiawa tribe are not yet complied with. "No arms have yet been returned, nor any of the horses or cattle, but for the return of the latter £5 and £6 per head is being demanded. " Instead of carrying out the conditions, Hapurona and hi* ' amicable' [query] son Horopapera (who, just before the war, was convicted of cattle stealing) have been about town continually getting drunk at the public houses and elsewhere. " I am, Sir, yours, &c , " W. K. Hulke, i'New Plymouth, 3rd May. 1861." By the steamship " Corio," which airived at the Manukau on Sunday night, we have Taranaki news, in the " fierald," under date 11th insfc ; but nothing of importance has transpired since the " Tasmnnian Maid" left.

It will be seen, on referring to our advertising column*. > hat contracts will shortly be entered into for completing the remaining length of the seven miles of tramway connecting the Dun Mountain Mines with Nelson. We are glad to make this announcement, especially at a time when the unfortunate state of the colony has unsettled to a great degree the steady progreti of commerce *nd speculative undertakings. The certainty of success is, however, so great that si moment's consideration must show the promoters of this work that any unnecessary delay in its completion will detract largely from the yearly returns. When the tramway shall have been completed the transit of ore to the Port of Nelson for embarkation will be a bagatelle compared with the increased profit thus secured. The 70tu Eegiment.-— After twelve years of active service in India the gallant 70th Eegiment of Foot were despatched to New Zealand by the Indian Government, when the necessity for strong reinforcements to put down the Maori rebel* became pressing. They were embarked at Calcutta in three ships— the "Darnel Rankin," which arrived on Satuiday ; the " Louisa, •ignalled in the Eangitoto Passage on Sunday ; and the " Minden," which left several days after her sister transports and has not yet been heard of The first detachment, commanded by Capt. Oswald Pilling, 311 •trong, were landed from the " Daniel Eankin" yesterday about noon. The men paraded in double column on. the Quesn-itreet Pier, and marched off to the OtaJiuliii (""amp t) tl.ejinus'c of the band of the 65th f . They are a fine body of pen, rather sallow from proiraeted 1 exposure to an Indian nun, but have the look of trained and resolute soldiers. A few weeki of the bracing ax at Otahuhu will restore tone and

I vigouV after the enervating effects of an unhealthy I climate and a long sea voyage ; and, from the temper I and spirit of the men, we are assured that if led to atI tack the enemy in the field they will maintain the honor of their country untarnished, And add another laurel to that chaplet which they so recently won in India, when single-handed they disarmed and quelled the mutiny of 15,000 disciplined and.disaffected Sepoys, Who held possession of the" key of Northern India. The men wero loudly cheered *s they marched horn the sh'p along the pier ; and one old soldier, from the Pensioner Settlement of Howick, was almost in ecstacies welcoming many of his former companions in arms who still wear the dark facings of the 70th. The " Louisa," tioopslnp, left the Sand Heads at the same time as the "Daniel Bankin,** and brings Colonel Trevor Chute, with the head-quai ters and band of the Regiment. The " Minden" brings the remainder of the Regiment, under the command of the senior officer of the corps, Colonel Thomas James Galloway, and is daily expected. The Weather.— We have had uninterrupted sunshine since our last. The air is chilly at night, but bracing. There is apparently more elasticity in business circles in consequence. Auckland RirLE Association. — The general competition with the Enfield Rifle was concluded on Saturday, when Mr. Fenton stood at the head of the list. The following is the result of the shooting so far : — Fenton, 18 points ; Evitt, 17 points. Ties. — Turfcon, Aitken, McNicol, and Wilson, 16 points ; Gunclry, Cameron, D.illiston, and Gleeson, 15 points ; James Russell, Holdship, Abbott, Dowdeu, Clark, and Williams, 14 points. Ties to be shot off on Monday, 20th iusb. The competition with breech-loaders and carbines begins on Wednesday the 15th inst. Military Movements. — The camp at Otahuhu is in course of completion. The 12th and 14th Regiments marched there at the end of last week ; and the first detachment of the 70th Regiment, which landed from the " Daniel Rankin" yesterday, inarched thither also. The remaining men and officers of this fine corps will, on anival, proceed to the Camp at Otahuhu. At present the men *re under canvas, but as soon as possible wooden huts will be erected the better to protect them from the inclemencies of the season. The detachment, temporarily quartered at Potter's Barn, has been lemoved to the Camp, The 65th Regiment will occupy Albert Bariacks. Mysterious Occurrence. — An inquest was held at Tuianga, Poveity Bay, on the 23rd March, on the body of a gentleman who was known as Dr. Knowles King. The body was. found lying in the river Ami by some natives, bearing maiks of violence on the head and face • the jaw was also broken. From the depositions at the inquest, and facts that have subsequently transpired, it appears that when last seen the deceased was in an excited state, owing to the excessive use of intoxicating diinks, and most possibly fell over the steep bank into the Arai, which at that place is about forty feet above high-water mark The bottom of the river is all filled with stumps and stones, a fall on which might possibly have produced the maks noticed on the body. However, Dr. W. B Smith deposed that death was caused by drowning, and that a fall on a stump could not have fractured the jaw. The natives, who found the body, also declared that there were no stumps in the river at that place. The unfortunate deceased was last seen at a native settlement. A case of suigical implements were found upon him. He is a native of England. New Zealand House of Representatives. — The General Assembly of New Zealand will meet in this City on the 30th instant, for the transaction of the general business of the country. The following are the names of the members, and the electoral districts which they represent in the third New Zealand Parliament :— Francis Dillon Bell, Wallace; Alfred De Bathe Brandon, Porirua ; William Butler, Mongonui ; Hugh Carleton, Bay of Islands; Charles Rooking Carter, Wairarapa ; Isaac Thomas Cookson, Kaiapoi ; Alfred Richard Creyke, Avon ; Herbert Evelyn Curtis, Motueka; Thomas Dick, Dunedin (City) ; Alfred Domett, Nelson (City) ; William Henry Eyes, Wairau ; Isaac Earl Featherston, Wellington (City); Josiah Chfton Fnth, Auckland (City) West ; William Fitzheibert, Hutt , William Fox, Rangitiki ; Thomas Fiaser, Hampden , Thomas Bannatyne Gillies, Bnice; Geoige Graham, Newton , Robert Graham, Fianklin ; George Williamson Hall, Heathcote; Heniy Shafto Harrison, Wangamu; Thomas Henderson, Noithern Division ; Francis Jollie, Timaru ; Charles Henry Kettle, Biuce ; Walter Baldock Durrant Mantell, Wallace ; William Mason, Pensioner Settlements ; Edward McGlashan, Dunedin (City) ; David Monro, Picton ; John Munro, Marsden ; Marmaduke George Nixon, Franklin , James O'Neill, Northern j^ivision ; George Maurice O'Rorke, Onehunga (Town) ; John Davis Ormond, Chve ; Alfied Renall, Hutt; William Barnard Rhodes, Wellington (City) ; Andiew James Richmond, Collingwood , Christopher William Richmond, New Plymouth (Town) ; James Crowe Richmond, Omata ; Thomas Rowley, Ellesmere ; Thomas Russell, Auckland (City) East; Alfred Saunders, Waimea ; Edward William Stafford, Nelson (City) ; Henry Powning Stark, Napier ; Charles John Taylor, Raglan ; William Waring Taylor, Wellington (City); Cro3bie Waul, Lyttelton (Town) ; Frederick Aloysius Weld, Cheviot ; James Balfour Wemyss, Nelson (Suburbs) ; Augustus Edward White, Akaroa ; John Williamson, Auckland (City) West ; John Cracroft Wilson, Christchurch (City) , Reader Gikon Wood, Parnell ; , Giey and Bell — It will be recollected that last week we g? ye currency to a rumour that Mr. Henry Powning Stark had resigned his seat for Napier. Who his successor may be has not yet transpired ; but we print his name, which appears in the list handed to us, with this qualifying explanation.

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Bibliographic details

THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Tuesday, May 14, 1861., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVII, Issue 1400, 14 May 1861

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2,910

THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Tuesday, May 14, 1861. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVII, Issue 1400, 14 May 1861

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