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GENERAL NEWS.

The postal authorities advise that the Manuka, which is duo at Wellington to-day, from Sydney, is carrying Australian mails only.

A paragraph in Featherston camp routine orders states that in view of tho shortage of supplies in stationery and envelopes, the greatest economy must henceforth bo exercised in their use. Envelopes should only be used where absolutely necessary.

A large shipment of motor-cars from San Francisco was on board the steamer Waitomo, which arrived at Auckland last week. In all thero were about 200 cars, of which about 50 were for Auckland, and tho balance for Wellington. A number of the motors wore brought as deck cargo. Many came in cases practically ready for the road, and the remainder were brought in parts, to be assembled after being landed.

"With shortage of paper becoming acute in jS'ew Zealand, it is interesting to note that certain areas of forest are reserved for the purposes-of the woodpulp industry. They arc in the Westland land district, and by notice in last week's "Gazette" the areas arc altered, the reservation being removed from certain lands and placed upon others.

The Postmastor-Gei:eral announces that following the practice obtaining in the United Kinguom newspapers despatched by publishers or their agents to neutral countries are forwarded without censorship. These despatched by private individuals are not forwarded.

In regard to the official opening of the sanatorium at Hanmer Springs for returned wounded and invalided soldiers, which takes place on Saturday next, tho Minister of Internal Affairs stated on Saturday that an invitation to be present at the ceremony was to be given to the members of both Houses, urovided the neccssarv steamship and train arrangements could be made. If Cabinet's sanction could be obtained, the House would adjourn on Friday next in time to enable members to catch the steamer for the South. They would then be conveyed by special train to Culvcrden, where motor-cars would be waiting to convey them to Hanmer. After the opening ceremony luncheon would be provided, and the party would return in timo to cateh tho steamer for Wellington on Saturday night.

The Dargaville correspondent of the Auckland "Star" reports that a public meeting held in Kaillu on Tuesday night adopted resolutions as follows: —"(1) That the Government be informed that this district has sent, or is sending away practically all the single eligible inen to do battle for the country; (2) that there is a large number of aliens (Austrians) who are in gome instances stepping into their places, and reaping the benefits and privileges of our boys going to the front; (3) that there is evidence to show that a number of these aliens (Austrians) have in their possession firearms and ammunition; (4) that it is unfair to the women and children of the district that their men should be called up for active service and these aliens left to be a possible menace' to their safety; (5) that the Government be asked to grant facilities to the subjects of all alien ally countries to return to their own countries to fight for their own peoples, and that all aliens of enemy countries in tho Dominion be interned." Copies of the resolutions are to be forwarded to the Prime Minister, the Minister for Defence, to Sir Joseph Ward, and to the member for the district (Mr Coates).

Owing to the weather on Saturday all football and hockey were postponed.

The Health Department has been notified of another case of infantile paralysis from South Canterbury, the patient being a girl of the ago of six and half years.

Mr Hayman, who is engaged building the new rest house at Kaituna, states that all the stono work will be finished in about- a fortnight, and tho carpenters should complete their job in about three weeks. The resthouse should be ready for opening in about a month.

At a festive gathering, not a thousand miles from Taranaki, two farmers from wayback were overheard exchanging news of their respective sons away at the front (says the "Wanganui Chronicle"). "My boy went away a plain private, and has got a high commission already," said one. "My word, that's good," was the reply, "what is lie?" "He's a lance-corporal," was the reply, none the less amusing to tho eavesdropper, in that farmer No. 2 was none the wiser, and was quite satisfied that his friend was the father of one very close to a field marshal.

An unrehearsed incident occurred at the Featherston Camp on Monday afternoon, while tho Ministerial party was being entertained, says the "Auckland Star." The wife of a soldier, who had come all the way from Auckland, sought an interview with i.er young husband, who was in khaki. Having found him, sho asked a few pertinent questions concerning finance, and then attacked him with a very supple weapon. She was led out of tho military arena by a khaki policeman, much to the relief of a crowd that was assembling, and of her surprised and disgusted soldier boy.

A deputation from the Grey district waited «n the Hon. \V. Fraser, Minister of Public Works, at Wellington on Friday, to urge the reconstruction of the Cobden bridge over the Grey river. The deputation was introduced by Mr P. C. Webb, member for Grey, and other speakers were Messrs J. Colvin and HMcCallum, M.IVs. The deputation pointed out that in the interests of the district it was absolutely essential that the bridge should be reconstructed, especially in view of the fact that it served a very wide area. The Minister, after hearing the representations made, said ho would obtain a report from the Department's engineer regarding the matter.

The Hawke's Bay Education Board i s finding the acute shortage of teachers very difficult to deal with, and, from the account given in a Napier paper, the position is daily becoming worse. It is pointed out that the shortage of male teachers has opened the way to good positions' for females, but, though they have few qualifications, there arc said to be cases where girls not out of their teens have refused positions worth over £100 per annum. Their reason is that they hope to obtain even bettor positions nearer their present homes. Tho Board is now resolved to take strong action, and in future any unqualified probationer who refuses to accept a position offered without crood excuse will not lie considered in making further appointments until duly qualified by certificates and experience.

The financial position created by the war is causing the Wellington Lducotion Board sonip concern. Tho, annual report states that tho Board recognises tho need for, and has always practised, economy in its administration; but it ha.s failed to perceive in the financial and trading operations of the Dominion that lack of money which has been urged by.the State as a reason for reduction of expenditure even where expenditure is shown to be advisable. "The records of trade, of racing, of the totalisator, of the drink bill, of tho picturc theatre, of holiday traffic," it is stated, "all point to a full ability to pay for those things which the people desire. Surely, then, it can hardly bo seriously suggested that this people, while quite able to pay for its pleasures. is cither unable or unwilling to pay tho just charge, however large, for the sound education of it s children."

"While it is highly gratifying to see tho Dominion so prosperous and money so plentiful (remarks the "Trade Review," yet it is somewhat regrettable that more of the available funds do not find useful and profitable employment. Commercial enterprise is, no doubt, somewhat hampered by war conditions —high prices and inability to obtain supplies—but there is also a certain amount of timidity and disinclination to invest capital in undertakings that mean locking it up for long in view of uncertainty as to what rates will rule later on, and also what further taxation may be imposed on capital. Undoubtedly we. shall have to bear heavier taxation, but it is unlikely that this will bear harshly in any particular quarter, and in view of the prospects for our staple products the general outlook for New Zealand is very satisfactory

A proposal to utilise boy labour tho city firo brigade station is under consideration by the Auckland Fire Board. At Thursday's meeting of that body (says the "Herald'') tho superintendent, Mr C. A. Woolley, wrote stating that he was continually losing men owing to their enlisting for active service. Tlii s was leaving him without men who had a knowledge of the fire-plugs. He suggested that two boys from the ranks of tho Boy Scouts should bo employed at the central station. They should be lads who would be likely to remain in the Board's service, so that they could be trained in fire brigade work. Members present expressed approval of the idea, in that it offered a mean s of making boys efficient firemen by the time thev attained 19 years of age. Mr R. Tudehope mentioned that members of the Ponsonby Boy Scouts hnd for some time no?t, been practising with a reel. Mr Wcollcy's suggestion was sent on to a sub-conimittce.

'When referring to the important matter ot gcoas of enemy ongiu beuig imported iuuo New Zea.und under tno guise of goous in neutral and allied countries, and even in land, Mr IS. Anderson stated at a conference between the Auckland Chamber of Commerce and the Board of. Trade, on TnursUay, tnat he had been informed recently by the Prime Minister that the instruction requiring all shippers to send in a declaration certifying as to where goods came from did not apply to America, as some definite understanding; with the authorities there was pending. "You may luiow," said Mr Anderson to tho member of the Board of Trade, "why tho Americans should not be brought into line with other countries, but the business man does not understand why the same regulations should not apply. Considering that America insists on the same regulations as we do ? the authorities cannot take exception to us following suit."

Persistent rumours were in circulation during the early part of tho summer, said Mr A. A. Ross (president) at the Auckland Farmers' Conference on Wednesday, that the waterside workers were secretly planning to have a huge strike at mid-season, when tho full volume of our producc was going forward. The executive were very loth to believe that such a course of action could be contemplated at a time like the present, more especially by the Auckland Union, as their relations with them had always been fair and above board. They recognised the possibility, however, and that such an event might have far-reaching and disastrous consequences, as ships might be withdrawn from the New Zealand trade altogether. Upon enquiry, they satisfied themselves that no such precipitate action was contemplated, but there was a general feeling of dissatisfaction, caused by the fact that rates of pay had remained stationary for some years, while the cost of living had of late increased very materially. After some negotiations the increases in pay were granted, and the matter settled.

It is notified in the latest issue of tho "Labour Journal" that the Department of Labour proposes to curtail expenditure in printing, etc. Mr H. P. M. Berry, who gave tlio first cheque to the Patriotic Fund on its inception, has given £10 to tho j coal and blanket fund. In view of the increased cost of living owing to the war. tho directors of the Union of Australia, Ltd., have authorised a special allowance to the staff of 10 per cent, on salaries, as from January Ist last. "Can the Minister of Defence inform relatives as to tho best way to communicate by cable with our soldiers in France? ' asked Mr \v. I. Jennings (Taumarunu:) in the House of Representatives on Friday. "As far as 1 know," replied Mr Allen, "the be=t wav to communicate at present is care oi* the High Commissioner in London." The jubilee of tho Thames goldfiekl will be celebrated next year, and preparations are. being made to mark the event bv a:: elaborate programme. The occasion will bo the oOtli anniversary cr the date on which the goldfield was proclaimed, but. in order that the gathering may not bo marred by inclement j weather, it is proposed to postpone the celebrations until the. following sumI mer.

A voung man, before the broke out, went to England from the Argentine. On the outbreak ol' the war lie enlisted into an Fnghsli regiment, and sc-ved in the retreat ironi Mons, and m the fights at Neuve Chapelle he was not wonuded but suffered from strain, and was invalided and discharged with honour. He emigrated to New Zealand. aiul being perfectly fit in every wav. enlisted agam in Christcliurch, where, 'to his intense disgust, lie was "turned down" as beinjj a half-inch below the standard.

The criminal thoughtlessness of people who go up on tiie hills and r°*' boulders and rocks down for then amusement, was brought vividly to the notice of Air Hay man, tho builder or the Kaituna rest-house, a few days ago. Ho noticed sheep running about the hillside in a frightened manner, and heard the thunderous crash of the rolling rocks through the bush, and on investigation saw two men and a woman up near tho Castlo Rock. This dangerous practice will be reported to the police, for it is one that should be put a stop to.

The following is the result of a ,/ aid examination held at Christchurch recently, under the auspices of tho St. John Ambulance Association, the following having passed and qualified- for the certificate of the Association: Mcsdames Andrews, Cord.v, Loney, Palmer, Slater. Stewart, and "Watson, Misses Allardyce. Dartnell, Graham, Hement, Martin, Marriott, McClelland, Nelson, Noes, D. R. Snow, M. R. Snow, Barker, Thompson, Taylor, and 'Wratball. The followinc passed and qualified for tho medallion:—Mrs Goclby, Misses I>uffy. Humphreys, Peppier, Smyth, and Wilkin.

The shortage of glass has been ser'ously felt in photography circles, with the result that plates which were previously discarded or destroyed as valueless arc now being re-made and utilised. An Australian company has- devised a system of treating the plates, and making them available for iurthcr use. The Auckland branch of tho company has alreadv shipped several consignments to its "factory at Melbourne. Here they are cleaned and scourcd bv machinery, and finally re-coated. Most of the Auckland studios have disposed of their old negatives to the company, who purchase them at 3d per dozen for halfsize plates and 6d for whole-sized. One studio has forwarded no less than 6000 plates.

Tho president and executive of tho New Zealand Pharmacy Board havo for sonic time been endeavouring to obtain recognition of the services members aro rendering to the New Zealand Forces i n tho capacity of pharmacists and dispensers in military hospitals and camps, and on the transports. The Board has sought to obtain commissioned rank for thoso holding responsible, positions, and i- was pointed out to tho Minister °f Defcnce, the Hon. James Allen, that this procedure is adopted in Canada. So far, at any rate, Mr Allen has not been able to seo his way clear to grant tho request of the Board, referring to tho procedure in the Imperial _ Army, which is not to grant commissions to qualified chemists as such. A second increase in the price of Portland cement since tho outbreak .of war has been made by tho companies manufacturing in Now Zealand. Tho first advance,- equal to 4s 6d per ton, was made a year ago. In his report to the Auckland Harbour Board on Tuesday, the engineer, Mr W. ,H. Hamer, stated that tho price has now been increased 13.45 per cent., and tho cost of all the Board's works will advance accordingly. Tho present advance is explained by the manufacturers to be due to the general increase in the cost of production, wages having been raised 10 per cent., by the addition of the war bonus, while raw materials and bags arc much dearer and the coastal freight rates are higher.

"These exemptions in the Dominion are running into a large sum of money, and I do not think we can go on granting them," said the Commissioner of Grown Lands at Wellington on Thursday, in a case -which, camo before him from .Mr G. H. Smith, of Manganui, who wrote asking if ho -would be relieved of paying rent if ho enlisted. Tho applicant had a mortgage of £3000 over the property, but it was a productive farm. He said ho would bo able to for his wife and family if ho went. Tho Board refused the applicant's request, remark being made that such a man's duty was to stay in the country. "I do not think ire should encourage a man in his circumstances to go to the front,'' remarked a. member; "his place is to stay behind and work tho land. v

The bad -weather that prevailed <tn Saturday spoiled what would otherwise have been an excellent parade of tho Christchurch City cioouts. Tho provincial secretary of tiio Wellington scout district, Mi- It. i''. Joyce, was in Cliristchurch on a holiday, and it was resolved that the Scouts should parade in order to welcome him. Consequently the Avonside troops and the Linwood, Cashmere, and other Scout details assembled in tho Barracks, and were paraded for inspection by Scoutmaster Joyce, who was intioduced by Sir Cecil Moon, Commander ol the district. .Sc-cutrnaster Joyce briefly addressed tho boys assembled, and complimented the Avonside Scouts on having _ won the King's banner. The Avonside Scouts, under their Scoutmaster, Mr K. M. Taylor, paraded at their headquarters at St. John's Schoolroom on Saturday for inspection by their old Scoutmaster, Lieutenant J. D. Andrews, now in camp at Trentham. Their old officer was most cordially -welcomed, and addressed very brietiy the boys of his old command.

In addressing the Avonside Scouts at tho King Edward Barracks on Saturday afternoon, Mr H. F. Joyce, provincial for Wellington,' complimented the troops on carrying off the King's Banner and securing other honours. He had much pleasure in learning something from that parade. This was that tho Scouts could "run" under their own leaders—the boys controlled tho boys. He had seen no other troon do that, and ho had to compliment them. But he also had to criticise them, in that, 011 parade, the Scout leaders epokc to their Scouts as no Scouts should be spoken to. "Stir up, Darkie," a term he had heard used, was in reality more St for a shepherd to use to his dog than a Swut leader to the boys under him. That was one thing. Another was that a leader actually gave orders with his hands in his pockets. .If thev wished to keep up to their high standard, they must remember that it was by noticing and remedying these things tho credit won alone could be maintained.

The continuance of the war has hai'l the effect of shelving the proposal to ex-.," tend the Lake Coleridge electric power ! scheme to Banks Peninsula. The chairman of' the County Council, .Mr J. ]). Bruce, has received a communication from the Minister of Public Works stating that owing to war conditions tho largely-increased price of materials' and the pressing need for economy, ho regretted he could not now authorise the work. "When out of sorts, tired, weary, nervous. come and "Ask Loasby about it." Adults 3s <3d. children 2s. 9 Those interested in Oriental carpets and rugs will do well to inspect tho show windows of A. J. White, Ltd who are making a special display <jf thes3 goods. * 5 Warm Woollen Gloves for men, lg 3d 2s ili: long knitted Wool Gauntlets 4s lid. Motor Gloves and Gauntlets 5= lid, Wool Scarves is t>d, Is lid, 2s lid at Armstrong's. j Sooner than put obsolete apparatus in the melting pot, we are offering it to Technical Collego students at fes* than scrap prices. Seo window' Turnbull and Jones. Ltd.

Your home pets photographed in a manner you will appreciate, and result* will last lor over. Steffano Webb High street. ' Ladies are invited to inspect th« large stocks of handsome Fur Coats at Armstrong's Stores. Tho styles are new and varied, in grey and brown squirrel, marmot, Russian ponv, Conov seal, musquash, etc., all sizes beinl.stocked. Marked, as usual, at theii famous low prices.

Come along, ladies, we love to hear your cheery voices singing tho praise of No-Rubbing Launarv Help for washing clothes clean without r'ubbini o r injury. Kincaids, Ltd. 1

Concerning washing-day. Bad drying weather demands good wringing. We have just landed a full supply of the genuine "Novelty" and "Eureka" Wringers, including the new ball-bear-ing lines. Quality and long life guaranteed. Hastie, Bull, and Pickering, Ltd., opposite Ballantync's. c

Seventeenth Reinforcements—Now stocks of presentation goods for the soldiers —wrist watches, safety laiwrs,' shaving outfits, money-belts, writing-, wallets, photo-cases, fount ain-pons.; Quality goods, at Lewis and Anderson, Ltd., Cashel street. (I

New invention, "Pennodollc,' y modelling material for children, easily worked, no smell, and lovely colours;; Seo window. Drayton's, 766 Colombo' street, agents. 2;

PATRIOTISM AND BRITISH GOODS. . There was never a time when it w4l more important tliau at present to sup* port British industries, and when SI . plain choice exists between British and" neutral goods, as is tho caso in regard . to motor-cycles, no patriotic citizon of; the Empiro can hesitate lor a moment;',; In this particular instance patriotism : and self-interest pull together, for thfl British motor-cycle is beyond question superior to tho product of any other; rv country. Tho best British motor- ;v cycle on tho New Zealand market day is undoubtedly tho "B.S. A. which, in addition to incorporating the £ typical British characteristics of splen* did workmanship, great reliability, and. phenomenal durabilty, has establahed i; itself as absolutely tho most cfficionl motor-cycle for side-car or solo sorvica j,; ever designed. Tho "8.5.A.", has'a competitive rccord in both side-car solo events, which is tpiite uniquo in brilliance. A singlo-cylindcr engino of; unparalleled efficiency, and a shaft three-speed gear which spells perfection, , are tho two leading features,of. ;;\ tho new "8.5.A.," which is manufac? tured in two styles, with combined belt: and chain-drive and complete chain-.ylt drive respectively. Immediate cry. Adams, Ltd., Agents of B.S.A* V Motor-cycles, Headquarters Garage aijd,. Show-rooms, High street. Christchurcji;. I (G. B. Brown, Motor-cyclo Department- ; Representative.) ..

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GENERAL NEWS. Press, Volume LII, Issue 15602, 29 May 1916

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