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NEWS OF THE DAY.

The Westport Coal Company's output for last wee-k was 10,840 tone 19 C\Yt. The Agricultural Implement Enquiry Board is to sit at Timaru this morning to investigate charges of breaches or' agreement which have been preferred against tho International Harvester Company. Soino South Canterbury farmers are to bo called to give evidence. Professor Wall delivered a most enjoyable lecture to the Canterbury College Dialectic Society on Saturday ovening. Ilia subject being "Old Jest Books." His remarks wore profusely illustrated by examples, most of which wore hugely enjoyed by his audience. In conclusion, tho Professor traced the history of tome of the moro familiar chestnute, showing what a long life some of them have enjoyed. The Levels and Geraldine County Councils decided at a conference held on Saturday to build a now bridge across the river- Opihi ou the main road near Temuka. The material to be used is forro-concreto, the engineer, Mr F. W. Merchant, informing tho Councils that, taking into consideration tho increased cost of Australian timber, it would bo cheaper to build in ferro-concroto. The new bridge, which will replaco the wooden structure that has done duty for many years, is estimated to cost between £8000 and £9000. Up to the present, ferro-con-croto hae not been tried in South Canterbury. Tho much-abused umpire was discussed at tho meeting of the Canterbury Cricket Association on Saturday evening. It was explainod by Mr Hardy, who represented the Umpires' Association, that it was exceedingly difficult to get members who were ablo and willin" to carry out tho onerous duties, and his Association had decided to Fuspest that the controlling body should consider whether payment should not bo offered to thoso who would not givo honorary service. The proposal cerno rather es a surprise, and it was not received with any enthusiasm. It wo pay umpires, wo will be moro particular about thoso we got," said Mr Orchard. "They can oil make mistakes, some of them very flagrant ones." Mr ILmlv Miid that players frequently criticised tho umpires as though the latter woro being naid handsomoly for their services. It" was impossible for anyono to sco properly except tho umpire, who gave his decision on what he saw. Hβ considered that Mr Orchard's insinuations were unjustifiable. Ihe matter was referred to the Association's Council for report. Enquiries among several largo city houso and land agents by a "A«w Zealand Timos" reporter on Thursday, disclosed tho information that the dearth of houses in or near the city is even moro acute than it was two years ago. One agent asserted that a six-roomed houso that became empty on a Monday was desired by eeventy people before the day was out. Many people not only offered one or two pounds to the person who would inform thorn of tho locality of an empty houso, but aciumiy went to agents offering them increases of rents on those currently P a d if the agents would turn present occupiers out. Even in tho suburbs, according to another agent thero is a woeful paucity of houses for letting, and many builders are not at present building becausv of tho high prices of materials. All tho agents attributo tho immense number of enquiries for hired houses to a geimino increaso of newcomers to Wellington, and to 6omo extent to the number of people who have hitherto been sharing houses with other families, but are now seeking separate homes. An interesting statement concerning tho proportions of revenue taken by tho Lancaster Park Company and Baard oi" Control, through various attractions held on tho Park, was mado on Saturday evening by Mr H. C. Ridley, at the meeting of the Canterbury Cricket Association. He stated that cricketers ivero frequently told that tho charges would not be co heavy on other sporte and athletic hedics it it were not for tho comparative failure of tho game as an attraction to the public. As a matter of fact, the proportion of receipts from cricket compared very favourably with those from any other sport. A return Ead been prepared showing that over a period of fifteen yeare, from 1893 to 1907, tho receipts were as follows:—Tennis £310, evening cycling meetings £462. athletic eporte £902, swimming £269, football £3419, cycling £2537, cricket £3538. Thjs wae a complete answer to the contention that Christchurch people did uot tako a interest in cricket. The chairman (Mr Caygill) added that very few cricketers had the slightest idea chat they headed the poll at Lancaster Park. The return did not teko into account the fact that some of the matches were played oa Heglcy Park.

We hare to thank the Christchurch for a handy «**« <nvinc usefnl information regarding ?he nmnioipaTity of Christchurch. Tho master batchers and the Abattoirs Committee of tho City V™ n ™ will meet at «he Sockburn *&***»" & day to discuss matters connected wiui the abattoirs. Our Dnnedin correspondent tel«aranhs -.—Another broach of promwe case" is engaging the attention of the legal fraternity, in addition case previously mentioned against o medical man. A young man of this city has been eorved with « writ claiming £501 for a breach of promise of marriage. A defence, it is understood, has been filed in both cases. On Saturday evening, about eleven o'clock, as Constable Ryan wae walking down Manchester street, by Ridley c corner, he noticed one of three men who wore walking along the footpath, purloin en umbrella from the front of a shop. He and Constable Matthews immediately gave abase, and after a fast run, which afforded much entertainment to the largo crowd of spectators, two of the trio were captured, the third man getting away. Illustration of tho accretion in land values that has taken place in Wellington during the last decade has been afforded by the experience of Mr W. I?. Shortt. Somo twelve years ago (says Friday's "Evening Post"), when business in the city was moribund by comparison with present day volume, the Wellington Meat Export Company had a lease of property between Old Customhouse street and Mercer street, tind v.hen Mr Shortt approached the company to negotiate lor a lease of the land ho was favourably received, and tho leaso was given him at a poppercorn rental of ten shillings, and both parties to tho leaso were well pleased. Sir iShortt forthwith had a block of brick buildings erected on tho land, at a cost of six thousand pounds. Today, tho leaso is valued at £10,000 far land alone, and Mr Shortt has this week made doubly sure of his position by acquiring tho freehold of the lands from the Heath Estate syndicate. Mr E. C. Gannaway, chief mail clerk in the Wellington I'ost Office, on Friday night told the letter-oa-rners a little story of the younger postal days of Wellington. It was in tho early eeventics, and the staff on duty one Sunday consisted of two men and a cadet (Mr Gannaway). While they were busy with the mail a gentleman entered mo room. The officer in charge ordered him out, but be was either deaf or defiant, and came on. Then a heavy bundle of newspapers was thrown at him; still he oame on. This was too much for the officer, who caught the intruder by the shoulder, ran him outside and pointed to the notice on the door. " Private —No admittance." ''Can't you road?" he was asked. He replied that he could read, and, moreover, ho was the newly-appointed r'ostmosterGenoral, and had come in for his Southern mail. "Then why didn't you say so, and we'd have treated you differently P" said the officer in charge. A Maori who took a remarkable part in the Hauhau rebellion in Taranaki during the period from 1865 to 1869 died recently at Ohangai. a native settlement near Hawera. This wasTihirua, a man of" rank from the Ngatimaru country, on the Oppor Waitara; he was about sixty-five years of age at the time of his death. Tihirua was one of the leading warriors of Titokowaru s savage band in tho bush-fighting that went on almost continuously during 1868 and the following year, and he acted as the tohunga of tho heathen ceremony of the "whangai-bau," which was revived by Titokowaru, together with cannibalism and other barbaric practice*. This custom (says the "Now Zealand Times") consisted in. the cut-ting-out of the heart of the first enemy slain in fight and in offering it to tho God of War. Tihirua on various occasions—one in particular was after the defeat of the colbnial forces at Moturoa in 1868—took the heart from a white soldier's body, and made burnt sacrifice of it to Uenuku, Titikowaru's "fighting-god." Lato London medical journals to hand contain a list of the students who were successful in passing the Intermediate Medical Examination, of the University of London, held in July last. Tho subjects of thie examination are three, namely—Anatomy, .physiology, and pharmacology, and the students must pass in all the three subjects. Seventy-one students wore successful, and among them were two old Wellington Collego boys, Mr Ernest Edward Andrew T. ltigg and Mr Thomas Duncan Macgregor Stout. Only two otit of tho 71 students won distinction, in both the two most important subjects—anatomy and physiology, a Mr Shattock, who has won distinction in pharmacology, and Mr Stout. Mr Rigs won distinction in pharmacology. Looking over the list of tho students from Guy's/ College, it appears that Mr Stout is the most distinguished student of the year from that collego. Only one other Guy s student won double honours, and that was in physiology and pharmacology. Students in tho list hail from all tho medical colleges of England. News has been received in Masterton (shtb the "Daily Times") of the death at Ivaiwhata, on Tuesday, of Kehurangi Ringatu Waaka (generally called Ringatu). probably the oldest Maori Jn Now Zealand at tho timo of her death. Ringatu, who was reputed among the Maoris to bo from 120 to 125 years old, was probably at least 110 years old. She well remembered the second visit of Captain Cook to Now Zealand, and was acquainted with facte relating to tho earliest colonisation of New Zealand, which undoubtedly go to prove that the latter surmise regarding her ago is correct. She was the last of .the Ngaitumatahias, one of the fiercest of tho- old lighting tribes. At tho recent festivities at Tβ Ore Oro (says the "New Zealand Times"), a great-grcat-great-grandson of doceased'e named Hamaiwaho wae .among the three children christened. Ringatu enjoyed remarkable vitality, and her death occurred totpewhat unexpectedly, after a short illness. A great tangi will bo held at Kaiwhata, which a very largo number of Maoris are- expected to attend. A rather remarkable- instance- of a long-forgotten manuscript being unexpectedly returned to tho keeping of tho person who originally had it in his custody has been brought under tho notice of the "Otago Daily Times." Signer Squarise, of Duneain, received last week from Allan's, tho well-known music establishment in Melbourne, a parcel of orchestral soores of Verdi's opera of ,: La Forza del Destino," tho overture of which lie proposes to include in the programme of an early concert of tho Duntdin Philharmonic Society. Signor Squarise had himself playoa the first violin .in tho orchestra at "tho Theatre Royal, Tirrin, Italy, in 1873 or 1874, when the opera in question was being produced there by a talented company, and it may be imagined with what surprise ho discovered that tho orchestral soojes he opened a day or two ago included the identical first violin part used by him 34 years ago, and bearing hie name on the cover,, and not only to, but aba the second violin part used at the same time by a fellow student of his. As it is probable that at k-ast 20 or 30 complete sets of the orchestral scores of an opera like "La Forza del Destino" are in existence, it is exceeding strange that a part used by an instrumentalist over 30 years ago thould have come back into his possession in another quarter of the world in circumstances such as have been related. This particular ecore had belonged to tho late Mr Martin Simon':«n"s library, which was purchased by Messrs Allen and Co. in Melbourne.

The Domain Board have applied to I City^Councillor electric {Kg fi enable the watenng of the flower-beds m the Domain to be carried out. The captain of the Mary Isaboll after conferring with the captain 01 the Marjone Craig, is satisfied it was the latter vessel and not th« missine Constance Craig that he passed off Cape Maria Van Diemen on July 29th. Snow wee lying on tho higher portions of th© Port Hills on Saturday morning but rapidly disappeared under the influence of the warm rays of the sun. It i& noteworthy that snow on the Port Hills is unusual in September and very unusual so late in the month. The mines building at the Exhibition remains intact. Tho Department intend to rearove the building -bodily, and place it on tho JStato coal site, on the South belt, where it will he used for the depot office. Tho transfer, however, cannot take place until Ilia Exhibition gates are pulled down, the present opening being too email Ito allow the building to pass through. Complaint was made on Saturday by some private box holders of the delay in having the Wellington mail sorted. It is underetood that the mail matter arrived at the Post Office about eleven o'clock, and had not been sorted within half-an-hour of its receipt. This was probably clue to the fact that tho mail room staff had also to make up tho mail for the second express for the South. Mr H. W. Bishop, S.M., presided at tho Magistrate's Court on Saturday. Elizabeth Saundere (Mr Hunter), a young woman, ploaded "guilty" to a charge of stealing on© pineapple and two boxes of lollies, valued et 13s, the property of Daiey Cairns. Mr Hunter stated that th© offence, which was her first, had been committed whilo under the influence of liquor. Her husband was quite willing to pay for tho articles which were taken from Mrs Cairns. Tho Magistrate convicted and dischargI ed her on the understanding that she took out a prohibition order. A representative meeting of tho Prer-bj-torian Young Men's Bible Classes of Christchurch was held on Friday night, vhon the Presbyterian 'Bible- Class Amateur Athletic Club was formed. Rules and regubitions were passed, and officers for tho ©nsmng year wore elected. It wae decided to affiliate with the New Zealand Amateur Athletic Association. Tho object of the club is to advance amateur athletics in the Biblo Classes of tho North Canterbury district All members must be members of a Bible Class affiliated t:> the New Zealand Presbyterian Young Men's Bible Class Union and, Institute. At the Port Pirie Police Court on tho 3rd inst., a case, the outoomo of a charge preferred by Captain Maofie, of tho 6haw, Savill Company's steamer Tokomaru, against James Pailey, for endeavouring to induce a seaman to desert from the steamer was heard. W T hen the matter was heard before, it came out in evidence that the police found Pailey aboard the eteoinor• with a pair of handcuffs on, the captain stating that he had placed the man under arrest for being illegally aboard his vessel. The case was dismissed, and defendant claimed £19 19e for wrongful imprisonment. The captain had left with his vessel before the case came on. The magistrate gave a verdict for the full amount claimed. The Tokomaru put into Fremantle tho Other day, having been badly damaged in a heavy gale. At 5 p.m. on the 6th met. the flagship Powerful left Sydney for Colombo, carrying the timo-expired crews of the Australian station (pays the "Sydney Morning Herald")- A great crowd gathered to see the cruiser off, and Jack's sweetheart* were well in evidence, with waving handkerchiefs and in come cases, wet eyelashes and sore hearts, as the band upon the great grey ship struck up "polling Home," a chantey well-known to the crews of every "wind-jammer" and meat steamer between the Horn and the Nore. The Powerful looked her name, whatever critics may uave to say of" her fightin«power, grey, dead cold 1 grey againet the warm afternoon > glow and the smoky hane of the harbouT, her decks crowded with the sailors, and about her bulk tiny craft of oar and sail, from which gleamed ■jhiare and there the gey colour of * woman's dress. The semaphore arms wagged untiringly their last message to Australia for a long time to come. Then came the tug, and pointed the cruiser for the heads—the buoy was slipped, and the beautiful "pay-off pennant," 000 ft of snowy calico, red orjassed at the masthead l , and tipped with gilded bladders, streamed against the blue of the sky, or writhed in tho denso coil of smoke from the four funnels as the water bubbled above the slowly-revolving screws. The band declared 1 , its brass blurred by distance, that "auld acquaintance" should, not "b© forgot," and as the cruiser dropped down past the Challenger, a hearty British three-times-three startled the holering guile. Then handkerchiefs wero shipped , , and tears, for the most part, dried. The Powerful at Col&mbo will pick up the relief orews for vue Australian station. The annual report of the Tni Tapu Dairy Company states that the past year was the most prosperous eince its inception. The quantity of milk rcoeived during the year was 14,708,6731b and the quantity of butter made 637,0911b. The local eales amounted to 511.4891b, and 81,7041b were exported. The remainder was distributed in farmers' supply, sundry salee, and among employees. The average price for butter-fat per lib paid to suppliers was elevenpence and nine-forty-eightlis. The opinion, is expressed that tho present movement, with its demands amongst the Union classes, would have a depressing effect on Iho dairying industry; but as milking machines were coming into general uee they would assist in maintaining tho buoyant position of the industry. The company's property had been kept and maintained in cood order and in an up-to-dato condition, without any undne pressure on milk suppliers. As tho term of the company b lease of depot in Christchurch had almost expired, nnd owing to increased business, it was considered advisable, in the interest* of the oompnny, to purchase a property on the South Belt, with good dwollinghonse, and about a half-acre of land, where it was intended to ew-t cool stores, and other necessary buildings. Tho financial position of tho company was highly satisfactory. The directors recommended that id per lb on suppliers' butter be refunded out of tho balance of profit and lose nocount, making tho average price paid to suppliers 11 7-lCd. The directors also recommended that a dividend of G prr cent, be declare! on subscribed capital at July 31st, 1907. In spite of unseasonable weather, businese has opened busily at Messrs Armstrong's millinery Paradise. Lovely hats are priced thero at 12s 6d, and Fren-.h models aro from 17s Gd. 1 What is said to be the largest single Millinery exhibit ever soon in Christchurch is now to boeeonin Bcath and Co.'c big window (next Clifford's). It is 45ft long by 12ft. Every conceivable hat style for th© new season « on view, and the wealth of pretty colour combinations is responsible for a continually crowded footway. Tho favourite colours are well to the fore. There are some charming effects in the new Copenhagen blue, pretty pinks, palo vieu rose shades, and a number of i blnck and white shaded effects, the whole being thoroughly representative of London and Paris Fashions. 5 I Boys' boaters Is 3d, Iβ Gd, gents 2s 3d, 3s Gd. 4s lid, eoft straw* Is fxi, Panamas 19» 6d, straw gelatee "id to 3cs lid. merino pants Is (id, Norfolk suits 10s Gd. Armstrong's. »

The greatest labom-win» t-oX M§ nowadays on & firm it "^γ* , "*sl Disc Plough. SdoiJcSaV B"**s and Co., 23 lUnoheitw Sjj; *■** k Wallace and Co. W*£i •**. ' opened up a iropJrtatii? :£' J cameras and photogranße «!!si-* ! which they are'now ehowiJe M*' premisw in High street. nJViLS* V ot the beet and simplest makes or every description iwinen. j' *■«■? Rior iot y ; >;*«V V^^S* etylea, reliablo films and 7?? ing frames and chemicals that ffi| thobeet effects, are to be foiinffi! at tho lowest prices procurable fC? ' goods aro well worth tho ineoeeti^S l everyone interested in photanSk* Wallace and Co., Chemists aadPfcX' - graphic Dealers, High street, Ckri* church. ' *** i^ ib ,h? °° reot «. with •u»peadii«-i IW, P.D. 4 8 lid, cream dofflM Sicilians end luetros la lid 2i S , ' block luienetto 4Jd. Armstrong. *3 ' hota ' ttimA > is; Fashion is accountable erirr ■"-* for over-changing stylee. The ■Zμ.' is no exception. Large qua»,titieiV i ' spring and summer drew material & mohairs, taffetas, prunella and Sci£} ans, also summer costume oloibs ai»ut l>e seen at Black, Beattio and SSI In the art of designing d*o«ei uSfc costumes Miss Lawrence excels aro smart, and every detail iVaalP should be. Do no risk by waiting but place jour order *■?•* Moderate chargoe. , ;-i The cheapest house for clothing m - wry and euite to measure iZr'' , strong's. .' M * jf A special shipment of waeh recti* ris now on view at the D.I.C. tw smnrtest of delaines and veileev»:. floral designs, effective siripct Si "woven" delaines, embroidered w> blouses and robes in linens, lawns a*)/ muslins, in many choice effect* e»» r now bo eecured at tho D.1.0. at'tWr tj popular prices. v 4* Tho eyesight of children alatdd'. Ugiven more attention. The najorit* of young persons who euffer from ft* quont headaches, blurring of the print' etc., are victims of eye-strain, ,whick~ can be remedied by glasses. itM W^, ing of children's «yee ca*lls fOF-special care, .tact, and skill. This miy be assured by consulting J, D>ckaM Clarko, D.8.0.A., F.8.M.C., pJo! (London), lately returned after Unforl going a special course of training 'tt the Northampton Institute, Lonwm. Telephone 2321. Sight-teeting rooms t 148 Colombo street ti. . y To farmers and etationholden. He Robev Oil Engine for eimplicity, dtarability, finish, workmanship, hat ae' equal. Your shearing shed can be fitted up ill complete. All entfbeV guaranteed. Write for prices for the whole outfit. H. McClelland,'. tM> Cashel street, Ohristchurch. ,--TJ! Mr Ernest M. Sandstein, PAM.oI D.S.O.A. (London), Ophthalmic O&tfc cian, may be consulted on all caaeeof pil foctivo Eyesight romedkblo by glum/ Consulting rooms, Cashel 6tr«et tf 4 ; (next Ballantyne's). Hours, 9.8Q |c' 5.30. Telephone 397. Specialty, rialeu invisible glasses. . *'■% Now that the weather changeable, it is always interesting |c. know what it is going to be; ahft Vfcet tho total rainfall and th« temMraJMi has been in different parts of thuß try. A choice assortment *«fsjl gauges, barooMten^*.! ldf-r4ekteril| thermometer*, ,*>iMi other sdentifcHw etrumoata i« v to be seen at Johi 'ml Pmjtor's. Oculists' Optician, 180 Biff street, Christchurch. and as they mm boon priced very low, there is nOV m necessity for anyone to be withoniml Inspection invited. • ';-^™JI That idea of yours. Why'ill patent itP Consult Henry HugWi Patent Agents, 183 Hereford itMR .(opposite United Servioe Hotel). Jjjßl ! oonsulting fees'. ,XI

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NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 12910, 16 September 1907

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NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 12910, 16 September 1907

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