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FATHER OF HIS PROFESSION.

DEATH OF MR SAMUEL JACKSON. A DISTINGUISHED CAREER. The death, took place, at 1 o'clock this afternoon, of Mr Samuel Jackson, at his residence, Orakei Road, Remuera. Deceased, was an old and highly-respected resident, and was the father of the legal profession in Auckland. He was admitted to the Bar in England in June, ISS3, and arrived in Auckland two years later, when he joined Mr Merriman in the firm of Merriman and Jackson, with an office in Fort Street, and some of the well-kno-wn legal lights of to-day passed through that office, amongst them being Mr Fred. Earl, also Mr J. B. Graham. Later on Mr Jackson formed with Mr Russell the old-established firm of Jackson and Russell in Shortland Street. Notwithstanding his advanced years, Mr Jackson was regular in his attendance at the office until well over 80 years of age. Latterly failing health kept him at home. Mr Jackson came of a family that made its mark in various ways. One brother was the late Dr. Hughlins Jackson, the celebrated brain specialist, recognised as a pioneer in discoveries in that brarxh of the medical profession. The names of two oth-e.r brothers are better known in New Zealand. One was the late Major Jackson, who did such excellent work during the Maori wiit with his company of Forest Rangers, composed of sct,tler=' sons. The Forest Rangers under Major -Jackson were almost as expert as the Maoris in hush lighting, and therefore of. considerable service to the British forces. Another brother was Oaptain Jackson, who also saw service during the war, and was for nrany years a stipendiary magistrate in the Auckland province. During those stirring days Major Jackson had a close call in one figiit. A Maori had him covered with his musket, and would undoubtedly at such short range have brought him clown had it not been for the fact that he was killed first by one of the Rangers. Major Jackson brought back that musket as a memento, and for many years it stood in a corner in the office of Mr. Samuel Jackson. Mr. Jackson was most highly esteemed by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, as he had the bluff, genial manner so common amongst Yorkshiremen, and at the same time was warmhearted and generous, but his clarities were mostly of an unostentatious character. The citizens of Auckland owe a good deal to the late Mr. Jackson, as it was he who being called in a hurry late one night to make the will of the late Mr. Samuel Jackson Edward Costloy, was asked for suggestions as to how that gentleman's money should be left. On the spur of the moment Mr. Jackson named the various organisations to which the money was subsequently bequeathed. The idea pleased Mr. Costley, who had the wQI drawn up at once, as there was no time to bo lost, and it was signed forthwith. The way in which tha.t money •was divided showed the broad spirit always shown by Mr, Jackson.

On another occasion, the late Dr. Elam called at QAr Jackson's office and tusked his advice ac to what would, be a suitable object to which to leave hie money. Shortly .before that, Mr .Tackeon had been chatting lith a lady interwrt«>.d''in art, -who had referred to the need in Auckland for ;i school in -wh-ich tuiuon could be given to would-be artiirffi. .Vs the result of Mr Jackson's eugjreetion the Klam School of Art now exists in this city.

ilr Jackson married Miiss Ifandeno, daughter of the laic Jiev. Mandeno. CongTpgational minister, who started the (Oiureh at Remuera where St. Ldike'o Presbyterian is now situated. The following children were still alive in 1912: Mr Samuel Jackson (now in .San Francisco). Messrs J. H. and G. J. Jackson (auctioneers, of 'Auckland), Mr Thornton Jackson, LI.J3. (oi the tirra of Jackson ami RuHßoin. !Mrs 'A. Blair (of Wellington), Mrs W. Madill (of Auckland), andi Mies Ruth Jackson.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19130729.2.19

Bibliographic details

FATHER OF HIS PROFESSION., Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 179, 29 July 1913

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665

FATHER OF HIS PROFESSION. Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 179, 29 July 1913

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