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WHERE ARE HANSON'S NOTE" BOOKS?

■The con-trAve^sy between Ray Eonkester and Mn Borehgrevink over th« late Mr. T/Jahson's note books con- __^ Ues ' aA^' on bank holiday the. Times ' was able to publish a litter from Professor Lankester encl<*sin<* one from Dr. Bowdler Sharpc, and afso ono- from Mr. Borehgrevink. Th_ state.me_rts of the two latter aire absolutely contradictory, and ___th no kn/>w.edge of the circumstances beyond what has appeared in the press. J must say that so far the, weight of evidence is distinctly agaitnst Mr. Borehgrevink.

This is what Dr. BowdleJ- Sharpe says:—"Mr. Borchgrevink has never* given me a singie official nwte-book of Mr. Nicolai Hanson's nor of MrHugh Evans. He says that fte handed over some note-books to _ne. Ho' did nothing of the sort. Oh October, 1901, he paid me a visit at this museum, and I made a final attemtrfc to induce him to hand over? the official note-books for the purpose of publishing them in our forthcoming report. I pointed out to him- j_hat Mr. Bernacchd had piub.is.ied a statement that on his death-bed, Mr. Hanson 'handed over his note-books to th__ .omrnandp..' _ r> r . th*t the fact had) Wn confirmed to me personally by more than one member of the scientific staff of the 'Southern Cross.'- I told him that the want of these notetvoks had been oonamented upon byj Contain Barrptt-Hamilton and . Dr.' Wilson in their account of the seals, and I asked for some definite explanation as to what had become' of the official books with the notes on the animals collected during the' voyage. He a_-ain denied that any such books existed. I endeavoured to make him understand in what a serious position he stood with regard' to the public, who would hold him responsible for the loss of any of the papers. He dec! .r. d __«__ Hanson's memoir on the 'White Seal' had disappeared on the P. an* O. boat on the voyage Home. As Mr. Borchgrevink, at the above-mentioned interview, continued to deny the existence of the note-books, I.called in a witness, in -whose presence he once more declared that there was no notebook, and he expressed gjreat; surprise that I should listen to a : hy : statements- made by his 'subordinates' in preference to the assertions made by him, who had been the commander of the • expedition. It is clear from the evidence of his companions that the official note-books of Mr. Nicolai Hanson were six or seven in number; that, apart front the little exerciseJbook with a list of the specimens of birds got in the Atlantic (the only document of any sort given me by Mr. Bor.h_rre._nk), and the memoir on the White Seal (which he states was lost on the voyage Home) there were at leasti four other memorandum-books. None of them were ever handed to me."

Mr. Borchsrrevduk says the state of things is this: —"I initiated, organised, land commanded, the Southern. Cross Expedition, financed by Sir George Newnes. All the members of my expedition were selected and., appointed to their ddfferent position* by myself, each member being legal* ly bound not to part with any news, collections, or notes, 'originals a. copies' connected with the erpedltion without my consent, the notes, collections, etc., being the propertyof 0. E. Borchgreviink. Being myself, however, bound by agreement toi Sir George Newnes,. I formally ap* proached him before the Sotithera. Cross collections were offered to tho' museum. I obtained his consent, and? offered the entire collections to th-! Natural History Museum in SoutM Kensington. I also gave to Br. Bow** dler Sharpe those notes which I received from the late Nicolad Hanson,except those which were lost in H o* bart, and which were very _nsig___£_< cant and short, and written on _»__U tary paper.' Mr. ___coi__i Hanson wa* il! from the day of landing, and this. may account for those few notes left! by him. If my staff or others ha.* notes by Mr. Hanson at is contrary* to agreement, and . ought to have been delivered to me. Sir George* Newnes, through me and on my advice, then offered the collections as al gift, the offer being by me carried! out according to a letter (now in my! possession) suggested by Dr. Bawdier Sharpe. Lastly, let me say that, hart T chosen to keep some rtotes el-he*, for myself or for some «*^«gg what right, 'moral or legal,' would Professed Laakester haveJ^^JJ explain? Are^ no*s ?&£s&. * the reach lost to science? But I"".^' f these nMes *™gy £££. I^l keep.the "^g^^&tfr who practically &£&3®ffi irtgratHndo S?J?ISSS -SWf my U* work." __ _

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19020920.2.64.7

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 224, 20 September 1902

Word Count
762

WHERE ARE HANSON'S NOTE" BOOKS? Auckland Star, Volume XXXIII, Issue 224, 20 September 1902

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