Southern Cross masthead

1893-1908


Available issues

March
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
April
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
May
SMTWTFS
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
June
SMTWTFS
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
July
SMTWTFS
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
August
SMTWTFS
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
September
SMTWTFS
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
October
SMTWTFS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
November
SMTWTFS
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
December
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6

Background

Region Otago
Available online 1893-1908

The Southern Cross was an Invercargill newspaper, first published in 1893 by John Ward and Joseph Wilson. It was a weekly paper that came out each Saturday, and was a separate publication from both the Auckland Southern Cross (also known as the Daily Southern Cross) which ran from 1843 to 1876, and the Wellington-based Southern Cross, published between 1946 and 1951.

Both Ward and Wilson had previously worked on one of the major Invercargill newspapers, the Southland Times. Ward had also been a sub-editor at the other major Invercargill paper, the Southland Daily News. After their partnership ended on 28 February 1898, Ward carried on the paper with his brothers William and James, trading as John Ward and Co. James Ward had trained as a printer, also working on the Southland Daily News and then for Whitcombe and Tombs in Christchurch, before coming back to join his brothers on the Southern Cross.

The Southern Cross was described in 1905 as being independent in its political views but with Liberal tendencies, more in line with the Southland Daily News than the more conservative Times.

In 1911 Ward installed a photo-engraving plant and the newspaper became an illustrated paper from 18 March that year.

It remained a family-run newspaper. Ward himself died in February 1937, aged 81, leaving his half of the business to his wife. His will stated that he wanted his brothers to continue the business and be responsible for the policy and direction of the paper. They did, until William died in May 1942. James continued for another 4 years, but then sold the business in 1946. He died the following year. The Southern Cross folded shortly after it was sold, in November 1946.

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working