Daily Telegraph masthead

1881-1901


Available issues

January
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
February
SMTWTFS
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 1 2 3 4 5
March
SMTWTFS
27 28 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
April
SMTWTFS
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
May
SMTWTFS
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
June
SMTWTFS
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
July
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
August
SMTWTFS
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
September
SMTWTFS
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
October
SMTWTFS
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
November
SMTWTFS
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 1 2 3
December
SMTWTFS
27 28 29 30 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Background

Region Hawke's Bay
Available online 1881-1901

In February 1871, when Napier’s population was 2,179, the Daily Telegraph made its first, inauspicious appearance. With a liberal political stance – equal rights and opportunities for all – it was launched to combat the dominance of powerful land interests, and campaigned from the beginning for the break-up of the largest land blocks in Hawke’s Bay. Managing-director and founding editor, Richard Halkett Lord, a London journalist, even suffered a horsewhipping when his witty and pungent pen outraged a reader. However, the founding company was soon in financial difficulties and was wound-up 12 months later.

The newspaper was then taken over by four of its principal shareholders: Edward W Knowles (merchant), George E Lee (barrister), Alexander Kennedy and Thomas K Newton. None had a journalistic background, but Robert Price, who replaced Richard Lord, remained editor until 1893.

The Daily Telegraph’s coverage was in sharp contrast to the more conservative, ‘establishment’ views expressed by its already well-established competitor, the Hawke’s Bay Herald, which moved from bi-weekly to daily publication early in 1871 in response to the appearance of the new paper.

Initially, the Daily Telegraph consisted of four (48cm x 34cm) pages, each with five columns. Usually six of the 20 columns carried news, with advertising filling the other 14. Advertising cost 3s per inch and the newspaper sold for 2d. Typesetting was by hand and the paper was printed on a single-sheet hand press.

In 1879, the Daily Telegraph and Hawke’s Bay Herald’s circulations hovered around the 1,500 copies a day mark, but from 1880 the evening paper began to outpace its morning rival.

The Daily Telegraph office in Tennyson Street, Napier was completely destroyed during a major fire on December 18 1886. For a period, until new premises were built, a small news sheet was produced every evening at a local printing office.

By 1891, with the retirement of his partners, Edward Knowles had become sole proprietor and in 1908 when he, in turn, retired, the newspaper company was sold to the already substantial Auckland newspaper group controlled by Henry Brett, Thomson W Leys and William J Geddis. Geddis, a member of the Legislative Council, became managing-director, beginning a long family association with the newspaper. His son Trevor M Geddis, succeeded him as managing-director in 1921 and became editor in 1929, remaining in that position until 1951.

Until 1982, Daily Telegraph ownership had remained in the hands of descendants of the three families that bought the newspaper in 1908, but in that year it merged with the Hawke’s Bay Herald-Tribune. Two years later the new company became part of New Zealand News, then a Brierley Investments subsidiary. In 1988, New Zealand News sold its Hawke’s Bay interests to Wilson & Horton which, in turn, was bought by APN NZ in 1996. Although the companies behind the two Hawke’s Bay newspapers had come together in 1982, it was not until 1999 that the Daily Telegraph and Hawke’s Bay Herald-Tribune merged to become Hawke’s Bay Today.

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working