Ashburton Guardian masthead

1879-1921


Available issues

September
SMTWTFS
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
October
SMTWTFS
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
November
SMTWTFS
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
December
SMTWTFS
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3

Background

Region Canterbury
Available online 1879-1921

The 1870s and 1880s saw a flurry of newspaper publishing in Ashburton. First there was the Ashburton Mail, established in 1877 by Joseph Ivess, a prolific publisher of country newspapers. This was followed by the Evening Echo in 1878. The next year Ivess published the Evening News to help him in his bid for the Ashburton mayoralty. Charles Dixon and Horace Weeks, the owners of the Echo, now called the Ashburton Herald, started the Ashburton Guardian to oppose Ivess’s ambitions. Ivess narrowly lost the election although it’s not clear what, if any, effect the Guardian had on this.

The town couldn’t support four newspapers so in 1880 Edward George Wright and Hugo Friedlander, the new owners of the Herald and Guardian, merged their two papers under the title of the Ashburton Guardian. In 1884 the Mail was sold to William Jules Steward. Steward had worked on various papers in Canterbury and Otago and represented the area in local and national politics. In 1885 Steward acquired the Guardian as well.

Steward’s political commitments (he was a Member of the House of Representatives from 1881 to 1911), made it difficult for him to devote enough time to his papers and in the 1890s he leased them to Henry Willis, eventually selling them to Robert Bell in 1900.

Robert Bell had worked on newspapers in Australia and Timaru before coming to Ashburton. He would become Managing Director of the Lyttelton Times in 1917 and Chairman of the Timaru Post in 1922. Bell closed the Mail in 1932 and died in 1937. His son W.B. Bell succeeded him as manager.

The Guardian is still published by the Bell family, making it one of the few independently-owned daily newspapers left in New Zealand.

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working