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HOUSEHOLD HINTS.

It/ is important to avoid all greasy foods- for the little ones in summer. This- impairs the digestion and works many other ills. When teething baby is often very thirsty at frequent intervals. This is caused by feverishness. To relieve the little one’s thirst, give him. some pure water. Milk should not be given. as this is a food, not a beverage. If a child is frightened at a bath, cover it with a small sheet, then lay him on the sheet, and slowly lower him into the water. In this way any shock is avoided. Children should get a great deal of exercise at natural gymnastics, as games may be called. They should play in the open air, or, failing this, in a large, well-ventilated room. To avoid draughts arising between the cracks in the floor, lay a piece of plain lel't between the carpet and the bare floor. This keeps away all draughts. Milk, ixi which a little finely-chop-ped suet has been boiled, makes a. very nourishing beverage, and if sweetened, very few children will object -to it. Flies are such a trouble in hot weather that an old country method of controlling them is worthy a trial in our kitchens. A large bunch of feathery asparagus is tied and fastened near the ceiling ; to this haven, in preference to culinary dainties, the disturbing flies are said to go in larg-e numbers. It need not be an expensive cure, and is vouched for by more than one experienced old country housekeeper. All puddings that should he smooth and creamy, such as custard, rice, and tapioca, ought to hake or steam slowly. If they are cooked rapidly they are apt to curdle. An onion breath may he got rid of by drinking half a cup of hot water in which a pinch of baking soda has been dissolved. Some housekeepers put a peeled onion inside a fowl that is to be kept for any length of time. Th,s obsorbs germs that would otherwise infect the meat. Sliced onions or a bag of charcoal placed near meat of any kind has the same effect. Cane chair seats often sag and get out of shape without being actually in need of mending. This can he easily remedied by turning the chair up-side-down and washing the cane work with soap and water until thoroughly soaked, and then leaving it to dry—still upside -down—-in the air and sun. The seat will become tight and firm again.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SOCR19061215.2.25.2

Bibliographic details

HOUSEHOLD HINTS., Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 42, 15 December 1906

Word Count
415

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. Southern Cross, Volume 14, Issue 42, 15 December 1906

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