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The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916. PARTY SPIRIT IN THE HOUSE.

Before the House of Eepresentatives was opened it was stated the session would be a short one and that the measures brought forward would be confined to legislation dealing with the war. The Governor's message showed the way by being the briefest on record. Under these circumstances it was expected that the Address-in-jßeply debate would consist of a few brief speeches, and that the real business of the session would be gone on with £t once, b , nas not been the case, and for some reason some members have made lengthy speeches apropos of the Govern-

■■:; defence policy. In these ■•■-.h:-;, "here is supposed to : Cα party feeling, n*ii- regrellabie that mem\v:uid waste so much time r>o:::dru'.;';,rv; ot tins sort.

b'lr }■!:'[''-:::'::•:, ::. particular made s. '.':\jsi, caustic speech. Of course every member has a right to his opinion and Mr McCombs evidently considered matters were noi being conducted in a right ar: proper manner. The point ;•;, '.nat his caustic abuse would ::.":. help the situation and he

vvciently had little sympathy irom his colleagues. Sir Joseph Ward, in particular, has shown himself to be thoroughly annoyed at Mr McCombs , remarks which he considered a direct breach of the conditions under which the National Government was formed. In the same way Mr Payne's criticism of the Government's policy in the treatof Germans in New Zealand loses half its weight through the bitter vien in which they are couched. The trouble appears to be that some of the members of the House cannot drop the old party warfare. Sir Joseph Ward has been an example to his old followers in the way he has sunk all party prejudice. No doubt some members of Mr Massey's party find it as difficult to forget party prejudices; but they do not voice their opinions as noisily as Messrs Webb, Payne and Me Combs. Many people hold that the Defence Department have been far too lenient in New Zealand. We do not want to treat our enemies as the Germans' have treated the British intern-! Ed in their country, but at the same time every protection should be given against doubtful enemy subjects. It is said that people of German birth { have no less difficulty in enter-!, ing New Zealand than the ordin- .

ary f British subject. These statemejnts are probably far fetched, but the bulk of people in New Zealand seem to consider that our Government is too lenient to enemy subjects. lln so many cases a detrimental story is circulated as in the case of Lieutenant Grierson. The Defence Department upholds the man and gi\«es him a military appointment. At the same time the man's name is not properly cleared. It appears to the unltiated that the proper course for the Defence Department would be to establish the man's

innocence. If so much prominence is given to the accused's alleged disloyalty, surely as much publicity should be given to the restitution of his name before he is employed in defence work. Mr Payne has not couched the complaint of the Anti-German league in the happiest manner, and it appears to us that the trouble lies in the fact that many members will not drop, party warfare. The House of j Representatives should waste no; :ime now in idle recriminations.; Ihe country is waiting for the : Convoui-.ivn Bill, Ihe Financial, 3t stern >-nt and the necessary, v/ar legislation, and it seems a| pity that all members cannot waive the party spirit absolutely and keep to the principles under which the National Government was formed

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Bibliographic details

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916. PARTY SPIRIT IN THE HOUSE., Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3548, 23 May 1916

Word Count
599

The Akaroa Mail. TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916. PARTY SPIRIT IN THE HOUSE. Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser, Volume LXXV, Issue 3548, 23 May 1916

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