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THE FOUR-POUND LOAF.

To the Editor. Sir, —Will you you kindly insert the following, as I think it is high time some attention was called to the matter. I have carefully weighed the bread taken from my baker, immediately on delivery, for the last three weeks past, and find, to my astonishment, that out of thirly-six 21b loaves and three 41b loaves, or in all, equal to twenty-one 41b loaves, there was. 124 ozs short weight, or, in other words, seven and a quarter loaves, equal to a third of the whole quantity supplied, and for which I have to pay. I am aware that some allowance has to be made for evaporation, itc.,in process of baking, but I think you will agree with me that this very great difference is beyond all reason. In mentioning this matter to a friend of mine, he contended there was no wrong done to the customer, inasmuch as the baker simply supplied a loaf at a given price, irrespective of weight. I contend, sir, that the public have a right to expect and demand that the so-called quarter loaf shall weigh 41bs in return for the price charged, whatever that may be. With your permission, I may wish to say something more on the subject at a future time.—l am, &c., Customer. Ashburton, April 2.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18810402.2.12.1

Bibliographic details

THE FOUR-POUND LOAF., Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 309, 2 April 1881

Word Count
222

THE FOUR-POUND LOAF. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 2, Issue 309, 2 April 1881

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