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Board of Governors.

OBDINAEY MEETING. A PAINFUL INCIDENT. An ordinary meeting of the Board of Cforernors of Canterbury Collego was held yesterday afternoon; present— Meeßra H. B. Webb (Chairman), T. S. Weston, J. J. Kinsey, E. Westenra, G. G. Stead, W. Chryßtall, E. W. Fereday, J. V. Colborne-, Veel. T. W. Stringer, J. Anderson, ]un., F. D. S. Neave, the lEev Canon Harper and the Eev Gordon Webster. Apologies were received for the absence of the Eight Eev the Bishop and Mr F. do C» Malet. COBBKBPONDBNCE. A letter was received from the Secretary of the European Market Gardener' Association, requesting the Board to adopt a olaaße in tho special repoat of the Agricultural School Committee with reference to the establishment of a trial ground for new and choice vegetables, and suggesting that facilities should be given to members of the Association to visit and inspect the ground with the object of getting Beeds of new vegetables. The letter was referred to the Agricultural School Committee. BLECTJON OF COMMITTEES. Mr Stringer proposed a motion to alter Standing Order No. 33, by omitting the wordß "and by ballot." The object was, he explained, to alter the' present mode of appointing committees, *.c., spending? the afternoon of the meeting in balloting. Mr Stead seconded the motion, which was carried, and Mr Stringer undertook to , bring in a motion at next meeting for altering the mode of election. BEFOBTB. The College Committee recommended that a third year's free education be granted to the individual who may succeed in gaining the scholarship proposed to be awarded in December next l>y the Caledonian Society, in accordance with the Sooietj'a letter of July 16* The report was adopted. : ▲ report of the School of Agriculture Committee, recommending that the estimates of the sohcol and the farm for the year ending June SO, 1896, and the prospectus, syllabus and regulations of the school as laid on the table, should be adopted, was considered in committee and adopted. PBOraSSOBS' BALABIBS. Letters were received from Professors Cook and Haßlam, in reference to the recent offer of the Board to engage them at £900 a year each, without feeß. The Chairman said that the letters nefl^fiot be read,' as copies had been furnished to every member. ......... Mr Stead moved— "That the letters be laid on, the table, and that no action be taken thereon." \ Mr ESnaey seconded the motion. Mr Neave moved, and Mr Weatenra seconded, as an amendment—" That the Board go into committee." Mr Stead objeoted to going into oommittee, and, after some discussion, the amendment was lost on the voices. Mr Yeel said that if the course proposed had given rise to any uncomfortable feeling; among the professors, anything/ that could be done to mitigate that feeling should be done. There was a good deal in the letters of the professors which was irrelevant. . The only reason why it was proposed to pay these professors 50 per cent more than others was because they would have to forego the fees they had hitherto received, and the only question to be considered was whether or not a salary of £900 a year was a f air compSngation. Taking the average Of the last five years, Professor Bickerton had received £923 a year, Professor Haslam £965. and Professor Cook just over JBIOOO. For the last three three years Professor Bickerton's average was the same, while that, of Professor Gsok was £1020. It had been pointed out that Professor Bickerton received payment as Government analyst and fees from persons outside the college for private analyses, and these he would not hays to give up. He (Mr Veel) thought that Professor Haßlam might fairly be paid £950 in place of the £965 he formerly received, and Professor Cook £1000 in place of his £1020. Mr Neave aaid that as Professors Cook and Haslam had done such excellent work it waa a pity to reduoe them, when' there was no absolute necessity. He thought Mr Reel's recommendation a very fair one. . Mr Fereday said that he was not awar?^ 'when it waß proposed to do away with the\ fees, that Professor Bickerton's; were not •to' be done away with. He would be very sorry 'to see an injustice done. * ' ' Mr Chry stall was of theiiame opinion as 'Mr Fereday. He moved an amendment, 'referring the matter to the College Committee,.to consider the whole question of (Professor Bickerton' 8 emoluments and the application of the Professor of Engineerins. " ' .■',■/■ ■ ; :■ The Chairman said that the fees still received by Profesßor Biokerton were different altogether from those which the ■professors formerly received from students ; =they werepaid by the, outside public for analyses. The other professors had known for twenty-one years that he received them and had not objected. As to, his being public analyst, the Board had been very anxious tor ■ him to.be appointed to the POSt. '..I' ■ ■ • ' ■ ■ :■ Mr Weston said that he would like to 'know apon what principle the College 'Committee was to reconsider the matter. Was it to raise the emoluments of Professors Cook and Haslam, or reduoe those ,o£ProfeßßOrßiekerton? , ■ The Eev Gordon Webster said that the suggestion of the two Professors was, apparently, that the £200 Bayed in fees from the literature chair should be divided between them. He thought that, on the whole, the proposal of the committee was fair and equitable, but he had no objection to its going back to the com.mittee. .* «. * »" .■ ' Me Stringer said that as Professor Biokerton had accepted the Board's offer, they could not take away his additional remuneration now. The position taken up by Professors Cook and Haslam was improper and untenable. Professor Haslam hatthowever, accepted the Board's offer, tmd Prof eßeor Cook must either take it or leave it. ,",',•„, i/n, ' ". , Mr .Anderson seconded Mr Chrystalrß ftmendmenfci After further discussion, the Chairman remarked that he did not know that the Board would disapprove; of the other professors taking private pupils. Me Stead trusted that the Board would not agree to Mr Chrystall'B amendment. The abolition of fees had been decided npon by the Board after most careful congideration by a special committee. If the Board sent the matter to another committee it would practically be a plight upon the special committee. The only point in wan that of the fee s paid to Professor Bickertonj if he was getting a higher salary than he was entitled to, it could be , altered. The letters of the othertwo Proiesjolß were very undignified, and referred .to subjects which were quite outside the {Board's consideration. At this point Mr Veel sank back in his chair gasping for breath. Thinking he was io a fit, tho other^ members loosened bis necktie and brought water. He became apparently unoonsoiouß, and Mr Kinsey took him up and carried him out of the room, closely followed by Mr Westenra. Immediately afterwards the latter gentleman came back and Bttid that Mr Veel was dead. A telephone message was sent to the house ©I Dr Symes, who came promptly, arnv-

ing within, five minutes from the time when Mr Veel had been stricken down. He examined the body, which was laid on the landing outside the Board room, and pronoanced life extinct. Several of the . J members returned to the Board room, and ' ! the Chairman said that, under the distressing circumstances, they could not do else than adjourn the meeting. The meeting was then closed. I

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18950730.2.2

Bibliographic details

Board of Governors., Star, Issue 5323, 30 July 1895

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1,230

Board of Governors. Star, Issue 5323, 30 July 1895

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