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Sydenham.

The nomniation of candidates for the representation of Sydenham in Parliament, took place at the Oddfellows' Hall, Colombo street, at neon, to-day. About 200 persons were present. The candidates, on appearing on the platform, were greeted with loud applause. The Returning-Officer, Mr C. Allison, opened the proceedings in the customary manner, and called for nominations.

Mr E. Jones, who was received with applause, said that he stood before them again to nominate a candidate. He did not consider it altogether a pleasing duty, because the present form of nomination should, he thought, be done away and was entirely contrary to the spirit of the ballot. (Applause.) He had very much pleasure in proposing Mr Richard Moles worth Taylor, (loud applause), as a fit and proper person to represent the district in Parliament. There was a determined effort being made to oust the Stout-Vogel Ministry, but he considered that Ministry had done more for this portion of the Colony than any other Ministry. (Applause and dissent.) He would cite a few instances in support of what he said. The Roads and Bridges Construction Act, which was a burden on this part of the Colony, had been repealed. (Applause.) What had been called the Grain tax, hai been taken off. (Applause.) The Government had also introduced a measure for preventing jobbery in Native lands. They had encouraged local industries, and engines and other things previously imported, were now made in the Colony. (Applause.) The Government had also reduced expenditure. (Applause and dissent.) He would quote Mr Montgomery, as honest a man a3 ever sat in the House, who admitted that Government had reduced expenditure by .£BO,OOO or JE90,000. The Opposition talked much about turning the Government'out, but they did not say what they were going to put in its place. Their candidates were not going to support, so they said, Hall or Atkinson, but whom were they going to support? What were wanted now were tried men. (Applause.) The people knew what Major Atkinson had done in the past, and they knew, too, how Sir John Hall had acted in regard to the pre-emptive rights, and how, when in power, he had hounded down a few poor working men who struck because they thought they were not receiving fair treat- I meat. (Applause.) If they returned Mr Taylor they would assist to keep in power men who would do their besb for the interests of all. (Applause and uproar, cries of " time's up.") Mr Jones continued his remarks amid considerable uproar, which at times drowned his voice. He quoted from Mr Crewes' speeches, accusing him, as far as could be told, of inconsistency in saying that he was in favour of abolishing the Upper House, but did not see how it could be done, and that, though a Freetrader, he did not object to some Protection. During Mr Jones' remarks a diversion was created by a couple of dogs starting a fight in the body of the hall. The belligerents, after a good deal of confusion, were removed, but the uproar continued, and at lepgth the ReturningOlh'cer took a vote is to whether the meeting desired to hear Mr Jones further. Permission having been accorded by a large majority, Mr Jones continued by stating his preference for a protective policy, and his belief that it was to the interests of the working classes to support it. Mr Crewes, he remarked, was not in favour of reducing the honorarium of members of the Lower House, where he wanted to go himself. (Uproar.) Mr Jones concluded by formally proposing Mr Taylor. (Cheers and uproar.)" Mr S. Day seconded the nomination of Mr Taylor, who, he remarked, had been tried, and had. not been found wanting. (Applause and dissent.) It was the duty of the electors, therefore, to again return him. (Applause, and cries of " No.")

Mr John vVhitelaw, who was received with applause and groans, proposed Mr John Crewes as a fib and proper person to represent Sydenham. (" No, no," and applause.) He had much pleasure in proposing Mr Crewes, as he had known him for a long time, and had known him only to admire him. (Uproar.) He wanted the electors to say at the ballot-box that they would not submit to .£260,000 extra taxation without a— r(Uproar, which completely drowned the conclusion oS the sentence). He felt sure that Mr Ccewes would be a man of influence in the House, and make his voice felt. (Applause and uproar.) He (Mr Whitelaw) did not consider the Stout-Vogel Government deserved confidence. (Uproar.) Electors should bear in mind that the present Government had bought up the District Bailways, and had packed the Upper House in order to do so — (uproar) — that som« of its members were connected with the New Zealand Agricultural Company. (Confusion) They should bear in mind that asking for retrenchment was reasonable. (Applause). Last year .£70,000 bad been spent on the Governor, the Ministers andjthe Legislature. Workingmen, before submitting to extra taxation, should insist on thorough retrenchment. (Oproar.) The concluding remarks of the speaker were almost inaudible owing to the noise. He was understood, however, to condemn " bogus Protection," and to express the opinion that Mr Crewes would be an excellent representative of the working met.

Mr Cutler had never felt greater pleasure than in seconding Mr John Crewes aa a candidate for their suffrages. After looking through Hansard he had come to- the conclusion that Mr Taylor — (A Voice t " Had been a good man." Uproar) — had not been a good man even to j himself, let alone the electors. (Great 1 uproar.) He had no doubt that the : electors of Sydenham would have the good sense and judgment to return Mr John Crewes at the head of the poll. (Applause i and uproar.) ) No other candidates being proposed, the Returning- Officer asked if the candidates wished to address the electors.

Mr TAyLtfis, who was greeted with, loud

applause, said that he did not intend to indulge in anything of a personal character, like those gentlemen whe had preceded him. (Interruption.) He wa3 quite sure that the polling day would show that the electors were not going to have an outsider foisted on them by persons who had no real interest in the community. (Interruption.) Mr Whitelaw had told him— (interruption) —that he had no objection to him personally, but that, as he (Mr Taylor) was a supporter, of the Stout- Vogel Government, he felt bound to bring forward a candidate against him. (A Voice: "Quite right." Applause and uproar.) Mr Taylor then went on to say that he had kept all the promises made at the time of his election. (Confusion, during which someone called out a reference to Mrs Taylor, and a cry of "Led by your wife!" was raised.) Mr Taylor requested the electors to refrain from personalities, as he did not intend to indulge in them, (applause.) He contended that he had always looked eopecially after the interests of the working men, and reminded his hearers that he had done his best to get the grievances of the unemployed removed. The conclusion of his address was accompanied by a great deal of uproar, which rendered much of what he said inaudible. He concluded by expressing confidence as to the result of the election.

Mr Cbeweb, who was received with tremendous applause and uproar, said that he always knew that before he sat down (Interruption — "soft soap.") He believed that they were quite prepared to listen to j the two or three reasons why he had come forward. (Interruption.) Surely they were, not afraid of what he had to say. . (Interruption.) -Mr Jones had accused him of inconsistency in regard to some of his statements, but every person who had endeavoured to answer them had had to misrepresent what he had said. (Uproar, and applause.) He had said that he had no spite against Sir J. Yogel, and this had been twisted into that he was not antagonistic to Sir J. Yogel. The Star had devoted a leader to the subject, making a great deal out of that word | " antagonistic." (Uproar and applause.) With regard to the abolition of the Upper House, no person who had advocated abolishing it, had been able to say exactly how it was to be done. (Confusion.) Mr Crewes quoted from his former speech in order to Bhow his opinions. The noise, however, was bo great that a great portion of hia remarke could not be heard. He conBidered that every working man wasaffected by the proposed additional taxation, and Bhould not/ submit to it without insisting on thorough retrenchment. He would oppose the Government on the subject of additional taxation and on further borrowing, which should, he held, close until the finances of the West Coast Railway were in such a position as would enable the work to be pushed on at the Springfield end. Knowing the state of our credit at Home, the electors should insist on thi6 cessation of borrowing. He would oppose, in the interest of Canterbury the proposal to borrow two millions, to be spent before the rest of our railway was in hand. He had not been sent in to represent the Borough by outsiders, and though it was true that he lived outside the Borough, Mr Taylor aIBO lived beyond its limits. Mr Crewes concluded his remarks amid a tumult of applause and dissent. The Returning Officer called for a show of hands, which resulted as follows : — Mr Crewes ... 87 Mr Taylor 83 The announcement was received with loud and prolonged uproar, tne supporters of the two candidates cheering and groaning lustily. A poll was demanded for Mr Taylor, and announced for Sept. 26, A vote of thanks to the ReturningOfficer was proposed as the assemblage dispersed, and the proceedings terminated.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18870919.2.28.1.2

Bibliographic details

Sydenham., Star, Issue 6036, 19 September 1887

Word Count
1,636

Sydenham. Star, Issue 6036, 19 September 1887

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