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THE SOCIAL SPHERE

[By Myra.]

LAST week, on Wednesday afternoon, at St. Paul's pro-Cathe-dral, Wellington, a wedding of a very quiet description took place between Miss Rena Dillon Bell, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Arthur Dillon Bell, of Remuera, Auckland, and Corporal Norman Robert Mackintosh, manager for New Zealand of the Sun Fire Insurance Office, who i.s in training at Featherston Camp. Mr Bell gave, sway his daughter, who wore a dainty frock of cream Georgette, the skirt being ■short and flounced with cream lace. Her stylish hat was of black velvet and gold tissue, and her bouquet of cream roses and maidenhair fern. The bridegroom, of course, was in khaki uniform. The man who was • to have supported the bridegroom •Aβ best man. was unable.to get away from camp, and. the. bride was unattended by bridesmaids. ChaplainCaptain W. H. Roberts [performed the ceremony, after which a small family party was entertained at the residence of the bride's uncle (Sir Francis Dillon Bell), and, as Lady Bell is in England, Mrs Rolleston and Mrs. Harold Johnston received the guests, amongst whom were: Mrs Ernest 8011, Mr Justice and Mrs Chapman, Mr Martin Chapman, Miss A. Moss (Auckland), Mrs Scobie Mackenzie, Mr and Mrs Alec. Mackenzie, Mrs H. S. Izard, Mr and Mrs Walter Bethune. &> ®> ® Mr and Mr* Mackintosh travelled by motor car for "Featherston," the bride wearing a coat frock of white silk and brown hat wreathed with autumn leaves.. Many beautiful presents were received from various parts of the Dominion. &> (&> $" Point Chevalier branch of the Auckland Women's Patriotic League held a garden party on Friday afternoon in the local domain and as the object was to raise funds for the Belgium Relief Association, it was rather a disappointment that the attendance was not larger. However, by dint of charging for admission, and having stalls laden with various useful articles and edibles, the sum of £25 was realised. The hall was prettily decorated with the flags of all nations, so was the verandah, and here lovely music was rendered by Miss Harvey (piano), Miss D. Niccol (violin) and Mr Sinclair (liute). Mrs Irwin, who had organised the fete, received and welcomed everyone and managed everything, assisted by Mrs Beatty and Mrs Tizard. Miss Rosa Sachs, who is a young dancer of great ability, gave some very charming exhibitions. Mr Preice arranged races for the children, and, as Mr Marshall donated a very large number of prizes, every child received something. Mrs Hankin and Mrs Crandel had a busy time in looking after the tea and refreshments. Misses Hawkins, Burke and Austin sold lovely sweets, which 'had been made by. Mrs Seymour. The day was .fine, and.the beach and surroundings looking lovely. A few of the visitors went in swim-

ming, and altogether a very happy time, was spent. Among, those present were: Mr C. J. Parr, C.M.G., M.P., Mesdames David Bews, Mogdnie, Dransfield, Mtorton, Beatty, J. Jones, Duncan, Jessop, Owen, Baldwin, Nathan, Percival, Misses Falder and Atkinson. <•' Mrs Hope Lewis is in Auckland. She is accompanied by Mrs Guy Williaims and Mies Frances. Perry, of Masterfcon,; ; ,....,, Mrs Kilgour.. of Parnell, has returned from her-visit to Wellington and Wangahui. :i ,'i ■ . •..'■?■ (& ' A military wedding of interest to a large circle of friends took place at St. Aidan'.s Church, R:>imiera, on Tuesday, 20tlr instant, the Rev. Arthur Fowler performing the marriage rites. -The bride was Miss Doris Knight, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs W. A. Knight, of Victoria Avenue, Remuera, and the bridegroom Lieutenant Ralph Worley, eon of Mr ixr.d Mrs W. P. Worley, ¥ Nelson. He belongs to the 24th reinforcements, and was. up on final leave. The best man was Lieutenant Rodwell, who is also of the 24th, and both, of course, were, in uniform. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked sweetly pretty in a lovely little frock of white chiffon taffeta and ninon, wreath of orange blossoms, and carrying a bridal bouquet. The bridesmaid was Miss Kathleen Knight, who wae prettily dressed in shrimp pink taffeta with black picture hat. « • • After the marriage- ceremony, a reception and the wedding breakfast took place at "Tikas," Victoria Avenue, the residence of the. bride?s parents, where the floral decorations were very charming. After the usual toasts and speechifying, the happy couple left for Featherston, where the honeymoon will be spent, Mrs Worley travelling in a smart suit of black and white check with touches of vieux rose. Her becoming; black Breton s>ailor hat was lined with vieux rase. The presents received by the young couple were numerous and handsome, and received great admiratjon., Mrs Knight, mother of the bride, was handsomely dressed in blue taffeta silk with hat to correspond. ® f> © Mesdames Collins and George, of New Plymouth, who are in Auckland for the marriage of their sister, are staying with their mother, Mrs Devore, St. Stephen's Avenue , , Parnell. During his stay in Wellington Sir Ernest Shackleton was the guest of Mr and Mrs Leonard Tupp. © (& ® Mrs' and Miss Craig, Miss Tref> gear, Mrs Glen, Mrs and Miss Darling, Mrs G. A. Coles and Mrs G. Bloomfiekl have been recently among Auckland visitors to Christchurch. m.: >$ © ::: Mrs E. Firth and her three young sons, who have been visiting Cambridge, has returned to Auckland. «£ ® W Miss A. Marriner, of Remuera,- is, at Cambridge staying with Mrs J. Hally. . * « #> A New Zealand lady, widow of the late Captain Burrows, is, I read, driving a motor car for a London doctor. # $> © Sydney girls are wearing the sweetest little necklets of coloured beads similar in shaps to a rosary bead. $|iigy are made in all colours, and with rose, heliotrope, lilac, or any perfume desired. I am told they are made from the leaves of flowers, tightly compressed, and then made, into the rough surface beads. Others • say they are made of carved wood. However they are fashioned, they are very dainty and inexpensive, and, as they have the latter virtue, one can'have a different necklet to ma>tcli every costume.

An Australian bank manager was so scandalised at sefeing the girl clerks arrive, at the bank with skirts many inches above tha ankle that he has made a rule that their dresses must be a certain length or that establishment ' will know them no more. Our girls are, as a rule, less daring, I think, v/than their cousins on the other side of the Tasman Sea.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO19170224.2.14

Bibliographic details

THE SOCIAL SPHERE, Observer, Volume XXXVII, Issue 25, 24 February 1917

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1,065

THE SOCIAL SPHERE Observer, Volume XXXVII, Issue 25, 24 February 1917

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