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NOMINATION AT GERALDINE.

Thp nomination of candidates for the electoral district o: Geraldino m the General Assembly took place at the Court House, Tcmuka, on Friday laet at noon. There -was a Tery eood attendance from all parts of the dutrictT Punctually at the appointed hour Mr Woollcombe, Eeturning Officer, called on the electors present to nominate a candiMr Moadolson proposed Mr Edward WaVeflvld as a fit and proper person to represent the district m the General Assembly. Tho i proposer m preface expressed his deep and r sincere retrret that his candidate was unable, i m consequence of the sudden dfnth of his ' father, to be present himself. He said he had 1 never .-xpectedt© hare to propose bis candij date first. Mr Wilson had tried to frighten i I him out of the Cold by writing and telling him ' ho was an outsider, but they would see what

was tlie r-Bult. Their duty that day was to onsidc'i; the merits of the* respective candicl itcs, and lay aside all party feeling, and see who would best, lo'-'k Hf ter their interests. Mr Wilson said he hud secured 106 vot^s, but lie (the speaker) did not know of 30.—(Applause.) There ivaa, however, Jo occasion for him to go into Mr Wilson's affairs/ Ah regarded Mr Hayhurr t, he came before them aa a provincialist. He had a*kcd that gentleman what he would accept m the pla<;e of tho provinces, but had hnd no satisfactory answer. New Zealand at present was governed by nine Provincial Governments and one Central. Independent of the Faring which would bo made by abolishing tho provinces, the General Government would bo aMc to rnrry out the Government of tho country without hindrance. He could not therefor!; place co: - fideuce iv Hr Hayhurst. Before any district; ought lo be taxed for a railwiiy ho considered il ought, to be consulted — otherwise a great injiis ! icu would bo done. As regarded the abolition of the provinces and the Local Government Bill, he said he lifid h"ard a gnat, BKiny tay that they knew what they had got, and what they were going to get hereafter, lie asserted thut they had had nothing whatever from the Provincial Government hitherto. They c)iild rely on it that when the province? were 'lone away with, tho affaiiv of tli« country would bo curried out. judiciously and economically. He would nest ask them what thny onaht to consider as requisite m a candidate. II» ought to have character, ability, and social position. If they had hnd f.he pleasure of listening to Ms candidate, they must krow hir« worth. Mr Hayhurst had said he would go m for counties, and have the uiugi't rates and police under their control. He believed it would ho a nest of corruption. He would not for onn instant think ot' supDorting a man unworthy of their confidence. Some people raid that Mr Wakcfiold must' not be supported because he lived on the other side of tho river — but there was no more selfish man than Mr Hayhurst, and one who conuidered his own interests first. In conclusion he expressed the great pleasure he felt m proposing Mr Wakffield, and he had no doubt but that tho electors would give the best man their votes. Mr Megson, m seconding Mr Wakefield, said lie was perfectly satisfied as to his being tho best man. Ho would not go into the merits of the other candidates. Mr Hayhurst no doubt {was a good man, but, being a provincialist, ha would not for one moment support him. The time would come when there would be but one Government, and they would have no scrambling, and get rid of all hangers-on. It. had been said that Mr Wakefield was a squatter's man. He felt quite satisfied that that gentleman was no party man whatever. He (the speaker) 6tood before them as a simple farmer, and intended to support him. Tho squatters had been the pioneers o£ fclie colon-y> hu-nne occupied tlje land when il was unfit for other purposes. When 1880 arrived, let them put the runs up to auction. Mr Wakefield m answer to a question lie had put to him, said ho would meet the elcetoM at tho end of every session, and resign at onco if they were dissatisfied. He hnd also said he would go m for land on deferred payments, and squash pre-emptive rights. If tho electors had studied Mr Wakefield's answers aa he had, they would find him tho innn to command respec| 1& Parliament, and bo able to vindicate their interests. Mr Hayhurst had not tho stamina to take v. stand m the House. He had great pleasure m seconding Mr Wakefiold's nomination.*. (Applause.) Mr K. F. Gray proposed Mr John Hayhurst as a fit and proper person to represent the district. Ho did not believe that Mr Wnkefiold had that-claim upon them which would entitle them to return him to Parliament. He outfit to have interests identical with theirs. Why divide tho districts at all if they were to have candidates from other places. Ho did not wish to run Mr Wakefield down, but he did not think him their man. As rogarded Mr Wilson, that gentleman had mnde a very barefaced assertion m a letter to fho Timaru Herald, namely, that the requisition to Mr Hayhurst was a dupe on the public, as not half the names on it were over authorised. He (tho speaker) asserted that the requisition wns genuine, and that he had the authority of everyone whose name appeared on it. (Mr lyfe — you never had authority to put mine.) (Applause.) Thoy would wait until tho election was over and the; i sco which had the greatest right to the action Mr Wilson talked about. He could not' see what claim that gentleman had on them, while tho candidate ho proposed had more than ordinary claims, having lived amongst, thorn a long time and been always read)" to assist the district and the people whenever required. It had been said that Mr Hayhurst vras a proyincialisfc. He could not sec it, as that gentleman had 6tated that if the Government brought m abetter system ho would support it. The question had to be studied by the whole Parliament. He believed Mr Hayhurst would ropresent them best, as ho had' a large stake m the district, and being a man of largo oxporienco, he would look well after little matters. If they studied their own interests they would elect Mm. (Cheers.) Mr John Martin seconded Mr Hayhurst's nomination. Mr James Hay proposed Mr Alexander Wi'son as a fit and proper person to represent tho district. Ho said the squatters had rough ridden the country long enough, ((jheers.) He voted for Mr Wilson because he considered him tho best man to look after their interests. Mr Boyd Thompson seconded the nomination of Mr Wilson. The Returning Officer then called upon tho candidates to address the meeting. Mr Hayhurst, who was received with cheers, thanked the electors for coming there that day. He was greatly obliged to the proposers of the other candidates for letting him down so easily. MrMeodelson had done great justice to his candidate, and had been bold enough to guarantee everything Mr Wakefield had said. He would not be inclined to do so even for himself, because circumstances might turn up to prevent lxun fulfilling his promises. He thought'he could, give Mr Mendelson credit for being a very clever man; and acknowledged ho had got the best of him (the speaker) m their private dealings. (Cheers and Laughter.) If they elected him, he could refer them to his past actions to show what he had done for them . He had not tho gab that Mr Wakefield had as it was not his trade. If he did not happen to be their choice, ho would fall m with it cheerfully, and whatever help ho could give tho favorite, he would givo with pleasure. (Applause.) He believed that credit was due to Mr WakeJJeld for circulating the rumor that he (Mr Hayhurst) was a provincialist. He had never heard anyone else) say so. All he had ever said on tho subject was that they ought to pause and not give up their privileges, until the Government gave them something better. There were some present, who did not care to contradict tho statements made about birr. He was no Btrangor to them, and they could judge him from his previous conduct. He pledged himself to do bis utmost for them, and to watch over their interests m common with the Colonial and ' ho would not give up their . present privileges without something better. Someone m Timaru had told him that Timaru was always dissatisfied, as they were to far away from Cbristchurch, andwero treated with contempt. They would therefore do away with the Provinces. He did not fall m with those views. They had a great deal to compiain of, but he did not see the remedy m tho General Government Abolition Bill. Mr ■Mendelson though a very clever man m his own line like Mr Wakefield, was nowhere, there-. Ho- asked them to weigh him fairly m the balance with the other two candidates, and if they found him wanting, not to voto for him. He would still be friends with those who voted iigainst him. i He would next say a few words about Mr Wilson's letter to. the Timaru Herald. He was never more taken aback m bis life, than when h« had been

charged with receiving a requisition which had n« exiateni.e. lie could not toll bow such charges arose. He knew some of the electors l.ad promised Mr Wilson to vote for him. He (Mr Hayhur»t), hod said ho would not come forward without a requisition, but he lwd never asked for a vote, and rever would. If they returned dim he would feel very proud, and if they rejected him, he would say they were honest and independent electors, who voted disinterestedly. (Applause). In conclusion he would thank them for the patient hearing thoy had given him. Mr Wilson said his first wish was to express his most heartfelt sympathy with Mr Wakefield m his misfortune", and as he was not there, he would make no remarks about him. During his canvass, he had not made the slightest remark derogatory to the other candidate?. Ho would however speak to Mr Mendelson as Mr Wakefiold'sjproposor. That gentleman had said that he (the speaker) had told Mr Wakefield he was too young. He had written to Mr Wakefield, telling him honestly that he was coming forward. Mr Wnkofieltl wrote m reply and thanked him for 1.13 letter. U'- considered the fact of Mr Stafford and others being his backer would prove his we ik ness. He was gliid to cay that voters were now free of Mr MencWson's influence, nnd could now voto as they likod without his swaying them. He had found requisitions end canvassing fcr others, but he said he would go and lay his views honestly and openly before tho electors, and let them elect him if they conbidered him the best man, but he had never asked anyone for a vote. He then read Mr Hayhuret'n reply to the requisition, and said that it wns soliciting vote 3. He had bo.>n charged with his letter to the Herald, and he would provo it. He could prove that i nine of tlie names on the requisition had not boon put there by the authority of their owners, who had never said they would Bupport Mr Hayhurst. (Applause.) Someone had said that he (Mr Wilson) could not afford to go to Parliament, as he would be worried too much about his private business. Nino out of ten who were m the Assembly were worried, and he could go with less anxiety than any of them, as he could leave liis business m tlie handß of his family. Ho had made up his mind to devote hiinsolf entirely to the district. (Applause.) They now knew all the candidates' views and hoped that they would put forward tho best man! (Cheers.) Mr Mondelßon said that m the absence of Mr Wakefield it fell ' upon him to answer the charges made against that gentleman. (The other candidates here objected to Mr Mendelson speaking.) Mr Mendelson said all he would ask the electors to do would be to consider the qualifications of the different men, and he felt suro they would exorcise their duties m a faithful manner. Ho thanked them sincerely m Mr Wakefield's name, and felt confident of that gentleman* return. The Returning officer then called for a show of hands, which resulted as follows : — Hayhurst 20, Wakefield 4, Wilson 5. Tho show having been declaredin favorof Mr Hayhurst, a poll was demanded on behalf of tho other candidates. The Returning Officer notified that the poll would take place on Monday, the 27th inst., the result to be declared at half -past 6 o'clock p.m. on that day. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, proposed by Mr Hayhurst and seconded by Mendelson, was carried with acclamation, and the meeting then terminated.

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Bibliographic details

NOMINATION AT GERALDINE., Timaru Herald, Volume XXIII, Issue 1300, 27 December 1875

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2,205

NOMINATION AT GERALDINE. Timaru Herald, Volume XXIII, Issue 1300, 27 December 1875

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