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THEATRICAL AND MUSICAL NOTES.

Bi Pasqutn.

TUESDAY, March 6.

The Rev. Charles Clark met with another detention. It is not a patriotic sermon in the Town Hall this time, but a deputation of Hobart citizens who were desirous of hearing Mr Clark's new patriotic oration, " St. Paul's, the Heart of the Empire," which, owing to the war excitement in England, has attracted immense audiences in the mother country. Mr Clark has continued his. journey from Hobart by the Waikare. As the gifted orator has come out specially for a farewell tour in New Zealand, he has declined all invitations to lecture in Australia; but it is hoped that he will give a few lectures in Melbourne and Sydney on his return.

Fitzgeralds' 'Circus have folded up their tents and glided quietly away northwards, taking with them many shekels. Oamaru was visited last night (Monday, March 5), to-nighfc the circus is booked for Waimate, Timaru and Ashburton following; a week in Christchtirch, then north to Wellington. The Bland Holt Company concluded a verysuccessful season at Wellington on Friday last with "The Absent-minded Beggar." The whole of the company left for Christchurch on Saturday, opening in that city last evenins

Dear Pasquin, — It is hardly news for you to know thai up to date (March 5) our season in Dunsdin. in spite of counter attractions, has been fully up to expectations. We make a flying visit south at the conclusion of this season, opening at Invercargill Monday next, 13lh inst. I hear that there are "other Pdchmonds in the field" — in the form of not less than two Kine show?. "Well, as they say in the classics, "Let 'em all come." Good wishes to friend Bis (the only one), and believe me to be, "still on the smile," Haeey Abbott, Northcote Kinematograph Company. After very successful seasons in Oamaru, Timaru, and Ashburton, the Pollard Opera Company proceeded to Wellington by Saturday's steanrer. On Sunday evening a sacred concert was given by the company in Wellington. On Monday the Pollards were to leave for Palmerston North, playing one night in that town, after which Wanganui (race week), I-lawea, and New Plymouth were to be visited prior to the company opening in Auckland at Easter. The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News states that "amongst the passengers on board the Mariposa for_ America were the Misses Zoe and Wilmot iCarkeek, two young ladie^jvho have proved valuable members of the Pollard Opera Company." Miss Zoe Karkeek, a very valued member of the Pollard Company, did proceed to America by the Mariposa, accompanied by her young sister Kate, a charming little lady of nine summers, whose stage experience is limited to two performances in Christchurch with the Amateur Operatic Society. Miss Wilmot Karkeek is still a member of the Pollard Opera-Company, and has no intention of leaving a company in which her talent is recognised and appreciated.

By the last mail boat for America several of the "Trip to Chinatown" Company left for San Franciscc — Miss Allene Crater, Miss Emma Siegel, Miss Viola Gillette, Misses Lizzie* and Nellie M'Coy, Mr Sam Marion, and the manager of "The Trip," Mr E. Cooke. Mr Harry Conor, who has gone to Sydney en route for the Transvaal, was down to say good-bye. Just prior to the sailing of the Mariposa Mr Harry Conor pleaded with Miss Gillette to sing "Because I love you " from the ship's side. The lady refused to sing, but notwithstanding Mr Harry Conor got "all his part of the business in." This was one objection we had to Mr Harry Conor when performing in this city: too much "getting business in" at the expense of the other artist, the other artist on the occasion I recall being Miss Gillette when singing "Because I love you,'.' accompanied by much fooling from Mr Harry conor, in the Dunedin Princess a few weeks back. The same song, introduced into "The Geisha," and sung by Miss Jennie Opie during the Pollard season, was good enough for three encores nightly, but Miss Gillette, during the "Chinatown" season, was compelled to share the feeblest of feeble encores with Mr Harry Conor for her rendering of "Because I love you." Why? Because MiHarry Conor "got his gusiness in." Dear Pasquin, — I am nearly my old self again, thanks to the- bracing atmosphere, pleasing prospect, lazy life, Wakatipu trout, and general good living supplied by Mrs M 'Bride (a most genial hostess). I intend coming back to town next Wednesday in order to finish the preparations for our anniversary night, March 14, at the Alhambra Theatre. — Yours, etc., Ben Fuller. During the_ run of the pantomime "Little Red Riding Hood" at Her Majesty's, Sydney, Misrf Dorothy Vane sang "The absent-minded beggar" to a constant hail of gold, silver, and copper nightly, the sum total for the panto, season being £300. Misd Vane is proud of her achievement, and deservedly so. At the conclusion of the "Henry V" season at the Sydney Royal, Mr George Rignold will farewell Melbourne. He leaves for Europe about June.

■ Marie Tempest, after a long and brilliant reign at London Daly's, has thrown up her part in " San Toy ' in a pel, and left George Edwardes lamenting. The real cause of the trouble was Marie's costumes, which are described as being daring and scant — even for Miss Tempest. Edwardes asked her to cover herself up some and alter the dresses, but she refused, and, after a $eal of bickering, resigned suddenly. She is shortly to. appear in an opera on " Madame Sans-Gene."

It was a surprise to many of Mrs Brown Potter's friends (says " M. A. P.") when she consented to appear at the Empire, because the inability to endure tobacco smoke is one of her idiosyncrasies. She tried to put up with it, but the smoke fiend conquered at last. Her voice began to be affected, and she was ordered by her doctor to take a rest. As Mrs Potter has explained, it is wonderful that anyone can sing or recite in a music hall. When the curtain goes up the smoke comes over the footlights like a fog bank. It is so thick that it makes the throat, nose, and ey.es smart, aud saturates th^ hair and clofcfir

ing with a strong and persistent odour. Mrs ) Potter was only on the Empire stage about a quarter of an hour each evening, yet her cos- ! tume, being brought home for repairs, filled ■ the whole house with a stale, strong odour of '

mixed tobaccos. Yet, in spite of the smoke. Mrs Potter greatly enjoyed her first music hall experience. To recite Mr Hamilton's verses is a pleasure, and she will resume as soon, as her physician will allow. Miss Addie Conyers, ,a prominent member of the celebrated and very-much-remembered

London Gaiety Company, which created considerable excitement in this city some few ' years ago, has (says the latest Era) quite taken Hull by storm by her interpretation of the title role in " Aladdin." Her performance is described as one distinguished by the greatest artistic delicacy. A writer in Sydney Bulletin says : — " Nellie Stewart's understudy (Mollie Lowell) who had to take the principal boy part on the first night of Drury Lane panto., didn't make much of a ' hit,' judging from some of the notices. She merely looiced smart and got ' through with credit. Her chief song was sung by a double, hidden behind a tree, Mollie meanwhile opening her mouth, and gammoning to be the genuine article, like Svengali and Gecko when they play dumb instruments in 'Trilby.'" Marie Lloyd, the leading light of London halls, contributes a little essay entitled "What's in a Name?" During an engagement in Liverpool, she and a lady friend called at the hotel of Mr Joe Elvin, a brother artist, to while an hour away. "Take my card up to Mr Elvin," she said to the atten- - dant. He did so, but returned soon and stated that the gentleman didn't know her. | Thinking he had some little card party in his 4 room, she insisted on being shown there in person. Walking in with a " Now then, Joe, what's the matter? All the family out of town?" she was suddenly surprised by being confronted' by a tall, spare, dignified figure,

who said, in a deep, tragic voice: "Pray be seated, madame. What can I do for you?" It was Henry Irving. The attendant had mis- ' taken "Elvin" for "Irving." Sir Henry \ was plain "Mr" at that time. j Mr J. O. Williamson, a few days ago, says i Sydney Referee, received a cablegram from j Mr Malone, manager for Mr George Ed- , wardes, and who represents Mr Williamson _in London, in regard to the new piece, '' 'i he Messenger Girl," just produced at the Gaiety Theatre. " Production a great success, notices phenomenal," was the message. The piece will be include in the repertoire of the

next Australian tour of the London C4aiety Company. Mr Edmund Payne played the ~~ chief comic character, and the cast included Miss Maud Eobson and Miss Grace Parlolta.

who were here with the last company. The new musical comedy was composed by Messrs Ivan Caryll and Lionel Monckton, and written by Messrs J. T. Tanner and Alfred Murray.

The Delevines and the Winterton Sisters, whose "Gambols" are still fresh in the memory of theatregoers in this city, were, "at latest, appearing in " Flirtation " in the Empire Palace Theatre, Dublin. Paul Cinquevalli, the marvellous juggler.

whose feats fairly astounded the natives of Australia last year, -is doing a "turn" with "The Babes in the Wood" Company at the Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool. Cinquevalli has been engaged by Mr Harry Rickards for another tour of Australia next year. New Zealand, I hope, will not be forgotten. Miss Edith Bl ancle, one-time leading lady of the Bland Holt Company, was (when the mail left) playing the Empress Josephine in " A Royal Divorce " through the English provinces. Sara Bernhardt's theatre will be opened

this j r ear. It was planned by her, and will bear her own name. It is said that the lighting alone will cost £3000 a year, and the saloon will be decorater with ten panels, painted by the most renowned French artists, and showing the lady in the chief .characters she -has played during her glorious career. Madame Melba, writing to a sister in Victoria, says: — "The Emperor of Austria is most anxious to hear me sing, as they are

trying to arrange a performance at the Opera.

My voice is perfectly beautiful. I wish you could hear it. Everyone says it is fresher than ever. I mu3t tell you of my wonderful

success in Vienna.

I am only now beginning

to realise it. What enthusiasm ! After I finished my last song I was called out perhaps 40 times. I pang them several songs, and played my own accompaniments. They screamed and shouted for more ; then, when they realised thai I would not sing any more, hundreds of people came on the platform, and shook and kissed my hands, and nearly tore

.me to pieces ; all the flowers -on my dress were torn off. It was really wonderful. I wish you had been there. All the members of the' Imperial family were there, except the Emperor, who never goes to concerts, so I am to sing at the Opera House on the 18th. when I hope he will go. I have never had such huge success as lam having this year. I am going to see Mr Musgrovs on my return to London, and see what J can arrange about going to Australia. I really must pluck up my courage. I wish I were going next spring, as the season will be too gad in London. 1 All my friends are in mourning, or dreading to be."

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

THEATRICAL AND MUSICAL NOTES., Otago Witness, Issue 2401, 8 March 1900

Word Count
1,966

THEATRICAL AND MUSICAL NOTES. Otago Witness, Issue 2401, 8 March 1900

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