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IN A NUTSHELL.

— Dilemma is getting all right again. — The dam of lainglass cost only 20gs. — Wayland is now at his owner s placo at Berwick. — Kimberley has been sent back to his owner at — Dun Joseph is my fancy for the St. Bathans' Handicap. — Boulanger. is scratched for the Rangitikci Handicap. — Crown Prince is now being trained at the Taieri by T. Cotton. - . — Young James Cotton is it Dunedin, having left Mr Stead's service. — St. Hippo when a yearling was offered to a Dnnedin owner for LllO. — Skirmisher is picking up and should be ready to race again as soon as wanted. % ..— The Canterbury trotting stallion Boston (by Berlin from Queen Emma) is dead. — The Nelson Club has sponged out its liability, and placed £100 on deposit in the bank. — A bill to legalise the totalieator has been introduced into the New South Wales Parliament. —Mr G. Coombes, of Toko, has bought the three-year-old iilly Black Pearl, by BurlingtonMiranda. — The two-year-old brother to Wolverine w turned out at Berwick, and will have a spell till March or April. — Ted Haukins has in hand a live year-old gelding by Johnny Faulkner from a Traducer mare, just to sec if he is any good for racing. „,_,. — The A.J.C. Committee have appointed Mr Joe Kean to the position of clerk ot the course, made vacant by the death of Ashworth. — The Oamaru Tradesmen's handicaps are hard to pick, but Satyr should nearly win the Boxing Day Handicap and Roseleaf the Flying. — The 1886 daughter of Apremont and Fallacy lias been named Illusion. Her foal, bred by Messrs Stephenson and Hazlett, is a colt. — That smart mare Rondinella. by Idahum— Fawn, has been sold by Mr Mercer to Mr W. Phelan for 6'Ogs— a low price, I should say. — Reflection and Finetta should between them provide the winner of the Wyndham Handicap, but next week will be time enough for tips. — The N.S.W. jockey Richard Poole has been disqualified for 12 months for having ridden at races white his name was on the jockeys' fine - Mr J. Stephenson has received from a friend in England a splendid lot of rugs and saddlery. The initials of the racing firm are worked on the — We must confess, says the Australasian, that until the totalisator becomes law we see no immediate prospect of a return to prosperity for the country clubs. — Tangi Maid, the sister to Wolverine, is now in M'Guinness' hands. She islju better condition than when I last saw her, and is said to resemble — 'British Lion should take a lot of beating in the Greymoutb Midsummer Handicap if he is at all well, and I think Iroquois good enough to win the Hurdle Race. — With the conclusion of the Newmarket Houghton meeting C. Morton hauded over the horses under his charge in the ownership of Colonel North to R. Kherwood, jun. — An Auckland telegram states that much uncertainty still prevails as to whether St. Hippo will start for the Cup. It is understood his party have not yet determined the question. — The Two Thousand and One Thousand Guineas for 1894 closed last month, the former race with 78 entries and the latter with 70, these numbers about sustaining the average of recent y — The owner of Bullerana, despite the ruling of theV.R.C. Committee against him, has sewed Mr Cox, proprietor of the Moonee Valley course, with a writ, claiming £90, the value of the 'lurkeith Handicap Stake, which the head quarters tribunal awarded to Eldorado. ■ — The turf contributor to iruth says that the ex-Australian racing man, Mr W. C. Cooper, must have been overtaken by what he terms a temporary gush of imbecility whqn he refused to accept 40U0gs for his horse The Lover, who was recently submitted to the hammer. — English papers announce that Ormonde lias been purchased from Senor Boucau, of Buenos Ayres, by air M'Donagh, n Californian coal millionaire, and that the great horse will forthwith be sent to California. The price is said to have been 140,000d0l (about 28,000gs). . — Says "Terlinga" :— Evidently the D.J.C. is anxious to stand well in the eyes of the country

clubs, and taking one consideration with another, it looks as though there are lots of troubles in front of those who wish to placate the small clubs and still keep the opponents of the totahsator at bay. . — An interesting competition of horsetaming between Professor Leon, who hails from Australia, and Professor Sample, an American, who also gave exhibitions of his skill in that branch about 10 years ago in the principal towns of the colonies, was in progress when the last mail lett —Mr Stead has named his Maxim foals. The filly from Enid is called Bellicent ; the rest, all colts, have these names: Mannlicher from Sapphire, Manser from Auray, Popgun from Burlesque, Musketry from Flattery, Missfire from Takemiss, Bloodshot from Iris, Toxotes from Aqualate, and Tocsin from Siesta. — While exercising at Randwick the steeplechase horse Australasian dropped dead. Australasian was bred in Tasmania, and was by Swiveller fromfcPaper. During last Beason he started in 12 jumping events, scoring a couple of wins, his last being in the match with Grafton, when, with 10.7 each, Australasian won easily. — Waterloo Cup betting commenced in England at the beginning of November. Pleasant Paddy (late Roman Oak) was supported to win £1500 at 20 to 1. Patrick Blue was backed at 2000 to 30, and Sir Sankey at 2000 to 20. Fullerton's name was also introduced at 1000 to 80 offered, " all in," and 7 to 1 with a run, but no business resulted. ,_, __ „ .„ — Cromwell Argus remarks :— "TheD.J.G. will have to make a radical change. The sweepstakes and heavy nomination and acceptance fees ara resented by horseowners, who feel they are racing for their own money. This limits the fields, and when a horse is made favourite the owner feels if he wants to back his nag that he is actually buying m — /t the Johnsonvllle meeting the handicapper has made a range of lOOsec in the thiee-mile race and 30sec in the mile race. This is almost equivalent to 'saying that Rarus and Dakota are not wanted at the meeting. Fifty seconds should be the extreme limit at three miles. Horses that have no show within that raDge should be kept to their proper business of dragging corpses to the cemetery. ' „r „ , , — It is a great thing in favour of Meddler and Isinglass, says an English writer, that they claim unblemished certificates, and from the manner m which they secured their latest laurels no doubt can be cast upon their staying powers Ench, too. is as sound as the proverbial bell of brass, and what we have seen of them so far points clearly to the irresistible conclusion that one or the other will win the Derby of 1893. . -At the' New York sales m October 109 English horses of all ages fetched 27,517g5. There were buyers for every lot offered. The stallion Hermence (by Isonomy— Thebais) was bought tor DOOOdol, and Whistle Jacket (by HermitFortress) realised 8590d01. There were reserve bids on Foxhall and Candelmas, and these not being reached they were sent back to their boxes, 16,000d0l being the best bid for Foxhall. —Mr J. B. Clark, feeling dissatisfied at the V.R.C. committee not awarding the Oaks to his filly Trieste, on the occasion of his appeal against Etra Weenie being declared the winner, has declined to accept the second money (lOOsovs) for his own use, and has therefore handed it over to the fund being raised for Mr Wicks, the wellknown amateur rider of New South Wales, who some time ago had to have his leg amputated — The Derby of 1893 was introduced at the London sporting clubs last month, and although the names of only two horses were mentioned, what took place was sufficient to show that the winter favourite for the Blue Riband will be Insinglass. Against the Middle Park Plate winner 9 to 2 was the best offer, after 5 to 1 had been booked, and against Meddler, who won the Dewhurst Plate, 11 to 2 wjis offered without finding takers. , „ . , —"Random" makes these sage remarks: Friends of the totalisator should remember that another general election is within measurable distance. The existence of the machine is not likely to become a vital question at the polls, but it would be well to seize every convenient opportunity to educate prospective members on the subject. There are already indications of a strong crusade on the other side; bookmakers and parsons. Sunday school teachers and sweep promoters will for the nonce walk hand in hand, and they will make a formidable combination.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18921222.2.71

Bibliographic details

IN A NUTSHELL., Otago Witness, Issue 2026, 22 December 1892

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1,439

IN A NUTSHELL. Otago Witness, Issue 2026, 22 December 1892

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