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NOTES BY BEACON.

•• Senex " has the following : — v There were at the Timaru races a few people who anticipated that some of the bookmaking fraternity might take advantage of the present position of affairs, aud considering the provocation they have received from some of the smaller clubs, and the abuse they have been subjected to as walking totalisators in some sporting papers, it is much to their credit that they have not* retaliated. They could not of course do so openly, for such action would render them liable to be posted as defaulters, but they might, if so inclined, get men to do the business for them, who would not care a brass farthing about the posting business. So far as my acquaintance with bookmakers is concerned I don't believe there is one of them who would so demeau bimself, and I have only touched on this point in the hope that these small racing clubs will not make enemies of the bookmakers but let them follow their calling, whether booking bets at definite odds or at totalisator prices."

The foregoing is all very well from the point of view taken by " Senex" ; he propably means well, but he does not know. As a matter of fact, it is a bookmaker that is at the bottom of the Stuart case, as is very well known in Dunedin, and as I not long ago hinted.' Since my remarks appeared this particular bookmaker told me distinctly that it was his money that worked the thing ; and not only that, but that he was prepared to spend " a lot more , in prosecution of his object, and that he would not stop until he had "bust up," all, the jockey clubs in New Zealand. I ventured a quiet hint that this laudable purpose might take more, money than a somewhat chequered career had left him ,witb, but it was to no effect; he continued to, rave about what he was going to do, and would even not listen to a caution that by " busting up " the jockey clubs he would be killing the goose that he wanted to lay golden eggs, for he would then have no means of plying his particular calling. I then left. , t , In connection with this matter, I may remark that a large number of printed forms for demanding back money lost in the totalisator have been prepared with a view of being used at our approaching races. Convenient spaces have been left in which the daylight robber is to fill up the names of the race and of the horse that he has dropped his money on. It remains to be seen if there are two men to be found contemptible enough to descend to the use of them — either for recovering their own fairly

lost money, or as catspaws for some person who is afraid to face the public ordeal himself.' ' ' The Dunedin Jockey Club's 1 committee held a meeting with respect to 'this' business on Mor> day, evening, and after' consideration decided to call a general meeting of members in order to get the rules of racing so altered that they could deal a simultaneous deaih-blow to the Stuart faction and to those 1 bookmakers who make' a' business of laying totalisator odds. Acting on good advice,' they suggest an' alteration of rule 23 and an addition to rule 30. Rule 23 is to'read as follows, the alteration being put between inverted commas: — The ', stewards' of a meeting shall have full power' to make all such arrangements for the conduct' of, "the meeting as they think fit, and to regulate and control the conduct of all officials and of all jockeys, grooms, and persons attendant on horses ; and to determine all questions or disputes arising between any persons' at or in relation to 1 anything done or omitted in reference to racing, " including questions' arising in reference to , the totalisator, and investments made thereon, and persons using the same, but not 'including disputes or claims relating to bets not made upon the totalisator ; and to declare any bookmaker or other 1 person who shall have' been proved to their satisfaction ' to' have betted' totalisator odds, except through the medium of the totalisator, and also any person who &haU have betted or invested in the totalisator, and who shall have repudiated his bet or investment, .to be guilty oi corrupt and . fraudulent practices on the turf." Rule 30 is to be altered so as to read as follows : — The powers of the stewards continue after the meeting for all purposes relating to disputes, objections, penalties, and disqualifications "and all questions arising under rule 23 and the amendment thereof.'

The handicaps for some of the races at the Dunedin May meeting appear in this issue, and, from a cursory glance at them, I fancy they have been carefully framed, though started on a rather low scale, there being ,only 2st' 71b between the top and bottom weights in the Provincial Handicap, and 2st 101b in the Tradesmen's Handicap. In the latter race, at all events, I consider that the lightweight division have no ghost of a show on this' account. However, the return of the acceptances next week will show the feelings of owners themselves on the subject. Among the swarm of trotters engaged in the May Handicap is to do found the cream of Otago and Canterbury, and should a good proportion of them accept, there will be more excitement over this event than over any trotting contest that we have had for some time. Duchess concedes a start to the lot, and deservedly so, I think, for she has often shown us that she possesses' a rare turn of speed, and there is no doubt about her ability to go three miles in good form. Daisy is one of 14 or 15 of the candidates that hail from Christchurch, and her performances are well known. Antrim's best performance is so' recent that it will be fresh in everyone's memory, but it is said that he has sustained an injury, and will be unable to face the starter. Frolicsome, Gipsy, Fidget, and Claret are horses that have performed more than respectably up North ; while Nap-a-nap showed extraordinary speed at Lancaster Park on April 9, when she ran third with '3osec starfc in the Autumn Handicap, and second from scratch in the Pony Handicap. There it not much of her, but what there , is cannot be found much fault with. She has, however, a tough customer next to her, in Jumbo, who, when in receipt of lOsec from the pony, beat her by 20 or 30 yards in the Autumn Handicap just referred to. They now meet on level terms, and this may bring 'them together. Silver Bell and Axe are old stagers that are well known here, while Mabel's recent sensational dividend renders her name familiar to us. Couger, Rockwood, and Chanticleer come from' Canterbury, as also do two fair performers in Bloxwitch and Dark Days — .though the last named has since passed into the hands of Mr E, Lyons. JBlox witch won a Pony Handicap at Lancaster Park, but was disqualified on the ground of having repeatedly broken. Dark Days won the Maiden Trot at the same meeting in a field of 15, but was quite out of the Park Handicap with 35sec start., John Oscar hails from Invercargill, and those whose names I have not mentioned are' either local or' country horses that are more or less known to the -public. It will be time enough next week to spot the winner, as, when acceptances close on Tuesday next,' there are sure to be some withdrawals.

Some little speculation has taken place since the appearance of tlie handicaps, doubles being openecl on the Provincial Handicap and Tradesmen's Handicap at prices ranging from 50 to 5 to 2, and on the Provincial Handicap and Trotting Race at from 50 to 4 to 50 to 1. Several horses are taken in the legitimate events — notably, Apropos, Mokoia, Teddy Yuille, and Marion : while in the Trot, Idle Girl, All Black, Reefer, Mabel, Ajte, Duchess, and lots of others find support. : The Jubilee Stakes was run at Kempton Park on Saturday and resulted as follows : — JUBILEE STAKES,, Of 3000gs, a handicap with penalties for winners this season. Second horse SOOsovs and third lOOsovi from the stakes. One mile. Mr H T Barclay's br h Bendigo, by Ben BattleHast}' Girl, aged, 9st 71b ... ... ... 1 Mr 3? JJonglaa' b c Hartley, 3yra, 6st 101b ... 2 Mr J Daly's b h Tyrone, 4yrs, 7st 91b ... ... 3 It is stated that an' action for libel is threatened against two of the Wellington papers for publishing a description of two alleged " confidence "men, which was applied to two passengers by the Hawea, to their injury and discredit.

' Although Major George was rather unfortunate with his champion, Nelson, at the recent A.J.C meeting, he expressed to a Sydney writer his intention of returning with the 6on of King Cole in the spring, when he anticipates better results.

•The civil case in the Resident Magistrate's Court, ia which W. Stuart was- sued on a judgment summons, was concluded on Friday last, and resulted in the defendant being ordered to pay the claim or take it out in prison. This individual is the same as was the nomina. plaintiff in the case against the Dunedin Jockey Club. •

At Otautau races on April 18, the Flying Handicap was won by Mr R. Tapper's filly Cliff, but the owner of the second horse lodged a protest on the ground that she had run at a race-meeting at Eastern Bush that was not authorised by the Dunedin Jockey Club.' The Otautau Club referred the matter to our club, which decidedthat under the circumstances surrounding the Eastern Bush meeting it be not considered a meeting within the terms of rule 19, and that consequently the horses that ran there shall not be disqualified.

This decision of the Jockey Club disposes of the matter of Mr W. Nobles' Bonny Jean, which also ran at the Eastern Bush races, an was, therefore, also held to be disqualified fo subsequent meetings.

Tenders for the services of a band at the ap, proaching races have been called for bytKe Dunediu Jockey Club, I mention this onl*

because some chronic growlers appear to have «ssumed that no band would be engaged. Or perhaps it was some uninterested bandmaster who was throwing out a hint. The Arrow Jockey Club's programme has been passed by the Dunedin Jockey Club.

Vanguard is reported to be in work again. Since the weights for the Wanganui meeting appeared the Jockey Club have, says " Flaneur," received a telegram from Mr Evett, asking them to alter The Gem's weight to 7st 81b in both handicaps. This is a very irregular style of doing things, and does not please owners, who ace the weights published and then a week afterwards hear that they have been readjusted. Mr Evett has evidently been flurried, and in rectifying the error has made another. He now calls upon The Gem to carry the same weight in both handicaps, whereas he has made a difference of several pounds in all other cases, which is only right considering the distances of the two races in question. He had better have another shot at it, and try if he can't adjust the weights properly next time. A large number of entries have been sent in or the Heathcote meeting, but the quality is nothing very grand, the best names being such as Ruby, Vinaigrette, Molly Bawn, and Mainboom.

It is stated that Administrator's days are •ver.

Denbigh heads the list of horses engaged in the Hurdle Race at the Wajpawa meeting, but he should be quite equal to winning it, seeing the company opposed to him. It will be seen that the handicaps for the flat races are framed on an excessively low scale, the top weight in the principal race having only .7st 12lb to carry, while the lowest impost is bat Bst.

Any amount of race meetings will be held on or about Jubilee Day— that is very evident. The latest contributors to sport in honour of the occasion are the Hutt Park Club, Takapuna Jockey Club, Porirua Jockey Club, and Kaikoura Racing Club. Mr G. Stead was asked to stand for the Avon aeat in Parliament, but business calls prevent his devol ing the necessary time to Parliamentary duties, and he therefore had to decline.

Tinman was offered at auction last week, but failed to realise \he price set on him. Arrow races on the 24th inst. will consist of seven events, amoug which about £70 will be distributed in stakes. Nominations are due on the 17th mat. The promoters of the gathering held a most enthusiastic meeting last week, and there is every prospect of a capital day's sport being provided for the local racing folk. The weights for the Winton races appear in another column.

The Sydney Tribune writes as follows concerning one of the Christchurch Champagne and Derby candidates for the season 1887-8 :— " Rather a peculiar case of mistaken identity has come to light in connection with the recent annual distribution of the Hobartville stud. At that sale were several ' foreign ' buyers, including Mr Kable ; of Queensland, and Mr A. Anderson, of Waikoikoi, New Zealand, and it .was between them that the mistake' occurred. Several days after the sale their purchases were sent to Sydney, to be in readiness for the first out-going steamer, and while in course of transit both buyers appear to have become a trifle mixed. Among Mr Anderson's contingent was a colt by Gloucester— Splendora, and Mr Kable's included a colt by Bosworth — Mysie Happer, yet the latter was quite certain that he had purchased the Splendora colt, and Mr Anderson was equally positive that the other was knocked down to him. Mr Clibborn attempted to rectify the matter, but the parties interested would not be told, and mutually agreed to take their respective fancies, no matter what might afterwards turn up; and thus Mr Kable took the youngster Mr Anderson paid for, and Mr Anderson became the owner of the other. Further particulars have been forwarded to each owner, so that nothing in the shape of trouble may come about hereafter, by reason of the colts being entered under incorrect pedigrees." A few days ago a well-known resident of Lyttelton fell a prey to two "spielers," who lightened his pockets of about £200 by means of the " confidence " trick. The two men were on their way by steamer from Dunedin to Wellington, and they are now under police surveillance in Wellington. Over £150 will be given in stakes at the Plumpton Park meeting on Monday. The programme is an attractive one, being made up of flat, hurdle, and trotting races. The Minister of Justice in New South Wales is preparing a bill intended to suppress the sweeps and " consultations " in connection with race meetings which are now in vogue all over the country. The measure is the outcome of a correspondence which has taken- place between the departments of the inspector of police and the Minister of Justice.

The well-known hurdle racer Little John dropped dead at Winton on the Bth inst. The horse was entered for the hurdle race at the Winton meeting, for which he was favourite.

Our contributor, •• Nimrod," writes that the Otago Hounds met on Saturday at the farm of Mr Macgccgor, of St. Clair Rise, and the run took place on this land and Mr M'Laren's, the adjoining farm. These are farmers who don't require even to be asked for permission to hunt over their land.; on the contrary, they always want to know when the hounds are coming, and they like the sport. In spite of the unfavourable look of the weather a large number of horsemen and spectators were assembled by the time Poole, mounted on Wildboy, with the hounds trotted up to the tryst with the whip on Wizard in close attendance. The master had his reliable Turk, who is going uncommonly well this season, Mr Percy Laing rode Glenara, Mr Taggart Robin Hood, Mr Hart Drummer, Mr J, Heffernan Kate, Mr Gore a chestnut, Mr Gourley, jun., Sweep, Mr George Smith the Day Dawn — Sting gelding, Mr Clarke Galway, Mr Mason a brown raarb, a lad was on Wedderburn Jack, and the Messrs Cotton, on ponies. Mr Gourley, sen., had a good mount on Ashby. The ladies present were Mrs Mason on Mahomet, Miss Drumm Flirt, Mrs Myers Cocky, and Mrs Walcott a bay mare. The Fisk Troupe were there, and appeared to enjoy themselves immensely. Both ladies and gentlemen as they inspected the leaps walked through the paddecks and conversed with the farmers and riders, and appeared to make themselves thoroughly at home. The ground had been completely saturated by the recent heavy rains, and was consequently very slippery, rendering jumping a somewhat risky proceeding, especially considering the rather stiff nature of some of the jumps. That these causes combined were not without effect on the timorous was rendered patent by the remark of one mudsplashing individual, who said he had never seen so many paddock hunters. The first fence, a rather high one, capsized the Day Dawn gelding, who slipped into the wire; the next, which had a ditch in front, had its banks lined with malcontents who refused to go farther at any price, coaxing and threats being alike of no avail. In the meantime the hounds, making the hills resound with melodious music, sped merrily on,

followed by about a dozen horsemen, with one now and then stopping and i dropping to the rear rank. As to the plodders behind, they jumped the road twice and ran to the cliffs near Mr CargilFs residence. The last two jumps were very severe, in fact at this point I believe Poole and the whip had the hounds to themselves, and were the only ones who jumped these last obstacles, as the ground was so heavy and the jumps so numerous and varied that none but those whose mounts were in good form could live to the finish. After a sufficient time had been given for the recovery from the effects this rather severe run had on the respiratory organs of men, horses, and dogs, the dragsman was despatched for another run. The first fence— -gorse with a rail and a wide ditch — nearly brought two, followers to grief, and the second was a stone wall, over which some splendid jumping was done. Disaster, however, overtook two, one .of ■ whom was the lady on Cocky, who struck and came down somewhat heavily. I was glad Mrs Myers escaped injury. A little further on the Flirt fell, unseating Miss Drumm, who, however, mounted and followed on. Cooky, however, left his fair rider in the lurch, and joining the first rank' went ingallantly on his own account. Three paddocks from the finish the field were in two divisions. The first was Poole with about four followers, still further shrunk at this point by the fall of Galway with Mr Clarke. The second division was headed by the Day Dawn gelding and Glenara, both jumpiDg splendidly. All went well with most of the followers, although the white flecks, and deepdrawn breaths of the quadrupeds showed the country had been holding and the pace fast, no checks having occurred. Fate at the last fence proved rather unkind to the aspiring young rider of Wedderburn Jack, he having got entangled in some wire which made both do obeisance to mother earth. The horse got his leg severely cut with the wire. Those who went through and wore at the finish were, as near as I could see, the master on Turk, Mr Laing on Glenara, Mr Clarke Galway, Mr Taggart Robin Hood, Mr G. Smith Day Dawn gelding, Gourley, jun., Sweep, 'J. Heffernan Kate, Taggart, jun.,The Drummer, and the lad on Wedderburn Jack. Most people then being under the impression they had had enough sport for one day wended their way homewards to fireside comforts as speedily as possible.

I take the following items of interest from the Press : — Mr Drake nominated Spade Guinea and Pasha for the Royal Park Stakes and Birthd ay Cup af the A.J.O. Birthday meeting, but the moment the weights, appeared he scratched the pair of them. Mr Drake's horses will not leave for Australia until July. — P. Butler has been making a clearance in his stable previous to the winter. Hanlon has been sold to a Geraldine sportsman for 200gs, while Mr R. Rutherford has purchased Master Agnes and the old racing mare Luna, the price for the pair being 300gs. — Jimmy Kean, who is so well known to Southerners in connection with Lady Emma's victories in the Dunedin Cup, is to be entrusted with the breaking in of Cuirassier (Trenton's full brother). —Foul Shot, who, it will be remembered, upset a big " pot " over Stonyhurat in the Auckland Derby of 1888, and the following day got defeated by Derringer, has been put in work again. The son of Musket and Slander has not been seen in public since the time alluded to, just 16 months ago, on account of showing signs of lameness. E. Kelly, his old trainer, has Foul Shot in hand, and he is looking the picture of health, and has passed into the hands Mr Gallagher, appears as sound as a bell. — Peter Osbeck of Auckland, at £150. — Previous to Nelson being shipped from Sydney for Christchurch, it is stated that Weeks, the Indian trader, made an offer of £2000 for him, but Major George was not ,to be tempted. Respecting the doubt as to St. Gatien's paternity, Mr J. W. Hoare, of Worcester Park, in the course of a letter to the London Sporting Life, says: — "As I have repeatedly stated before, when St. Editha came in use the second time Rotherhill was at death's door, and, with her owner's permission, St. Editha was covered two or three days running by The Rover, and was stinted and foiled to The Rover's time. Faust, out of Tinkling Cymbal, also returned as by Rotherhill or The Rover, was got in the same way. Rotherhill was taken ill at the commencement of the season, and the only mare stinted by him that year belonged to Mr Nightingall, of Epsom. My groom, Pearson, who had charge of both stallions at the time, is prepared to corroborate this statement. Besides, the, style and markings of St. Gatien are quite sufficient to convince anyone that he is a descendant of the Blair Athol line. I never had any interest in The Rover, except hiring him for a short time to fill Rotherhill's place. St. Gatien was got by The Rover and not by Rotherhill."

Lovers of sensational racing events will find the following account of a steeplechase that was recently run on the Anteuil course, France, rather interesting:-- Two horses— Trident and Haut-Cloud — were the only starters for the event, and, in jumping the brook opposite the Tribune, the former fell, and got rid of his jockey, Benson. Charles Cunningham, the trainer, who was standing by, at once caught the horse, and mounting, proceeded in pursuit of Haut-Cloud. At the next water jump, however, Trident again came to grief, sending Cunningham to grass, whereupon Bob Coulthorn, a well-known jockey and trainer at Mason's Lafitte, jumped into the saddle, but he also came a cropper, and then little Baker mounted. Haut-Cloud in the meantime had got half a mile ahead, but rerobing (as they say in France) at a hurdle, Baker managed to overhaul him, and eventually won, amidst tremendous applause. All the riders of Trident (Benson, Cunningham, Coulthorn, and Baker) had to go to the scales, and as the horse had jumped the proper course, he won the race. It is doubtful whether such a thing has ever before happened, and it certainly deserves to be recorded among the curiosities of racing.

Mr Cornelius Vanderbilt, has just presented to the New York Museum of Art, where it can permanently be accessible to the public, Rosa Bonheur's great painting, the " Horse Fair." He paid 53,000d0l for the picture at the Stewart sale, and the next day turned it over to the trustees of the museum in order that it might contribute for all time to the instruction and enjoyment of the multitude. Rosa Bonheur has thorough knowledge of equine anatomy, and the Percherons, which she represents as on their way to the fair, are painted with life-like vigour. In colour, in action, in everything the work is a masterpiece, and it is gratifying to know that it is to remain in the city of New York. Mr Cornelias Vamlerbilt has shown by his gift that his aims are not wholly Belfish. Surrounded as he is by great riches he thinks and acts for the common good.

It is a" favourite theory with some that the brother or sister of a Derby winner is better for the stud than the actual performer, because his or her vitality has not been drained by the training ordeal. The theory is scouted by

others,' and so the argument goes on. The following from the London Live Stock • Journal will prove of interest to those who have taken parkin the discussion :—'* For the first time in the history of the turf a thoroughbred foal has been born having a Derby winner for both sire and dam. This is a filly foal by Bend Or, winner of the Derby in 1880, out of Shotover, winner of the same race in 1682. The sire and dam both belong to the Dake of Westminster, at whose stud in Cheshire this filly was foaled, and as she combines the highly esteemed Stoekwell and Newminster crosses, it may be that she will prove an exception to the almost invariable rule that animals bred from winners of- great races on both sides are rank failures. A combination of this preoise kind could only have been possible twice before, the only two previous female winners of the Derby being Eleanor, in 1801, and Blink Bonny, in 1857. Eleanor had several foals, none of which distinguished themselves; but Blink Bonny threw a, winner of the Derby in Blair Athol; and if Stoekwell, his sire, did not win the Derby, he ought to have done so as easily as he did the Two Thousand Guineas and St. Leger. It will be interesting to follow the fortunes of his filly foal, as also of another, which, according to the Field, has just been foaled in Hungary, this colt being a son of Doncaster (the sire of Bend Or), whom the Duke of Westminster recently sold to the Hungarian Government, and of the unbeaten mare Kincaem. Eleanor, the first mare to win the Derby, was the dam of Muley, by OrviUe, and TroUus, by Walton. Muley was a good racehorse and a grand stallion. Crucifix, although not a Derby winner, won the Two Thousand and One Thousand Guineas and the Oaks, and she produced Cowl and Surplice, the latter a Derby winner.

AUSTRALIAN.

Mr Yon Doussa, the secretary of the Onkaparinga Racing Club, who was fined £10 for using the totalisator at the late meeting, intends to appeal to the Supreme Court.

A peculiar error has come to light with reference to the Australian Jeckey Club Sires' Produce Stakes for next year, for which no less than 13 entries have been received and published in the official books the progeny of sires that were never nominated. Included in the number are three of Mr James White's, six of Mr John Lee's, and four of Mr Andrew Town's. Those mentioned are by one or other of the following sires, viz. :— John Bull, Martini-Henry, Musket, Grandmaster, Sardonyx and Kingsborough, none of which subscribed to the stake. A similar mistake will be noticed by referring to the published list of entries for the last Sires' Produce Stakes, for which Mr C. T. Roberts' colt by Sweatmeat — Lady Exeter and Mr E. de Mestre's filly by Guinea— Laputa were both ineligible by reason of their respective sires, Sweatmeat and Guinea, not being included in the list of those subscribed for when the stake closed. Attention was a short time ago called to a similar error in the V.R.C. Produce Stakes with regard to Huntingtower. The Queensland Figaro publishes the following letter from Mr M'Donald re his dispute with the Cairns Jockey Club relative to the value of the (£50?) cup he won recently with Cadmus, which formed the subject of a law-suit :— " I was sorry that the Cairns Jockey Club made no attempt to settle with me. I had two experts to value the cup, and they say it is worth only £10. Both appear as witnesses in the case. I may mention that it cost me £11 to run for the cup, and if clubs are to promise £50 and pay with £10 I will race no more." It will be remembered that Mr M'Donald gained a verdict for £20,[in addition to the cup. The following are the principal amounts won in Australia during the current season: — Mr J. White, £15,058 ; Mr C. L. Macdonald, £4776 ; Mr W. A. Long, £4331; Mr T. Sampson, £3136; Mr W. Gannon, £2865; Mr T. Jones. £2428; Mr S. Martin, £2239 ; Mr W.J.Forrester, £1880; Mr G. G. Stead, £1388; Mr D. Cooper, £1282 ; Mr I. Foulsham, £1230 ; Mr M. Loughlin,£llß6; Mr M. Locke, £1200; Mr W. Strickland, £1050.

As next year is to be the celebration of our Australian Centenary, it seems to me, (writes " Augur ") to have been an oversight on the'part of the members of the V.R.C. Committee not to have introduced to the new programme a race bearing, the name "Centennial." Surely there is Borne patriotism in the members of the Victoria Racing Club, who have good reason to bless Captain Cook (?) for discovering Australia. Probably the A.J.C., whose committee is composed principally of men of Australian birth, will at one of their meetings of < 1888 introduce a race which will be worthy of the occasion: It will say little for their sense of national pride if they do not. They, however, have framed their programme without in the slightest recognising the centenary, but as it is quite likely that a special meeting will be improvised during the festivities which are to take place in Sydney, they have ample opportunity of celebrating the occasion in a becoming manner. Victorians who visited Adelaide when the sport of racing was at its zenith at Morphetville and on the old course, will remember the genial old sportsman the Hon. John Crozier, who" always took a deep interest in turf affairs. They will regret to hear that he died last week. Mr Crozier had passed the span allotted to man, for at the time of his death he was over 70 yean« of age, and nearly 50 years of his life had b en spent in Australia. Mr Crozier was the father of Mr John Crozier, the present proprii-tor < » the St. Albans stud.

Two betting caseh of - > > ne importance to turf speculators have latel} been before the law courts. In that of Webb v. Warne, the plaintiff, Mr A. G. Webb, of Preston, claimed £150 from Mr George Warne, for whom he had invested £150 on Footman at Elsternwick Park, and as the horse was beaten Mr Webb had to pay the money ; but though Warne had repeatedly promised to pay Mr Webb he had failed to do so, hence the action. There was no appearance for the defendant, and a verdict was returned for the plaintiff, but just at the conclusion of the case Mr Forlonge, who had been engaged for the defence, entered the court, and informed the judge that it had been intended to defend the case, but as the other side had not informed him that the case was called on, after promising to do so, he had not attended in time. His Honour then decided that execution should be stayed for seven days to allow the defendant to apply for a reinstatement of the case. In the case of Bowman v. Goulstone, the plaintiff sued to recover £250 won on a double which he alleged the defendant had taken at Caulfield en his behalf. Me Justice Holroyd, who tried the case, in giving bis decision, was rather severe upon the plaintiff, whose claim he dismissed with costs, a counter claim on behalf of the defendant meeting a like fate, though without costs.

After disbursing a sum for the erection of a suitable headstone in memory of the deceased jockey, Edward M'Gr&de, a balance of £208 remainedg and this, with an oil painting of the deceased, has been forwarded to his mother. Terminus, who won the double at Dubbo recently, is the same borse whose throat was cut

by a butcher boy at .the instigation of a man named Roberts, who received a sentence of eight years' imprisonment for the offence. Johns was executed for attempting to murder Roberts, and the latter was released.

The , CaoMeld Guineas (says " Augur ") is likely to attract even more attention than the Foal Stakes, because engaged in it are some of the best of our Derby candidates, and sticklers for public form will be' curious to know if the two-year-old cracks of this season have retained theirs. It is a' remarkable coincidence that Hortense should be nominated for this race, and not for :the V.R.C, Derby. . I ■ presume Mr Macdonald, when he sent in her name, fancied that she would be more at home over a mile than a mile and a-half, and possibly his assumption is the correct one ; but as she has since proved herself the most brilliant two-year-old that Australia ever produced, he doubtless regrets the omission. At a mile the filly may be able to hold her own even with Abercorn, who is one of the six in the Hon. James White's name. Aberdeen', Lava, and Carlyon are also engaged, and whichever carries the blue and white will carry the colours into a prominent place. If the race were confined to a match between Hortense and Abercorn , it would be worth, a long journey to witness, but something else will be considered good enough to enter the lists, if only to get a line of the two cracks. Mr W. Cooper has the highpriced Abydos, Rosewood, and Miranda, as well as the Giovanna gelding in his name, and it is quite likely that the lastnamed will prove the most profitable of the lot. In Mr D. Cooper's name are Huntingtower, Bowmont, Oceapa, and a colt by Darebin from Habena, one of whom may be found speedy enough to stretch the necks of Hortense and Abercorn. New Zealand is very strongly represented, Mr Mitchelson having four and the Hon. W. Robinson two. The former's are at Flemington, but the latter's has yet to arrive. Tranter is a very fine colt, and so is Whakawai, but whether they will be able to hold their own with such as those I have mentioned remains to be seen. Boz, Albert Loddon, Bedouin, Lady Loyell, and Perhaps are also in the list, and so is the improving Branchiopoda, some of whom are sure to sport silk on the day, and it will not in the least surprise me to see one of them effect the overthrow of the two whose performances this season have outshone all others.

Several of the members of the Victorian ring state that although a few escaped laying Frisco for the Sydney Cup, a great majority had a balance on the wrong side at the end of the A.J.C. meeting, the victories of Perfume, Ringmaster, and Marmion on the last day proving very disastrous to the pencillers. As a matter of fact, during the past season several of the leading members of the ring have had a very bad time, some of them being from £5000 to £15,000 poorer than they were. The Goleraine brancb/of the Mounted Rifles contains several* good horsemen, and it; is said that at the late review Colonel Price paid them the compliment of saying that the Coleraine detachment was the smartest inspected. One of the members distinguished himself in the Mounted Infantry Race at the Coleraine meeting. This was Corporal R. Siiverster, who rode Chancellor. About 50 yards from home his saddle slipped right round, but he cleverly preserved his balance on the bare back of the horse, and, seizing the trappings to preveut them falling to the ground, he set to on his horse, and won cleverly, amid the enthusiastic plaudits of the spectators. As he went to scale, however, the tumult of applause was changed to silence, aR it was believed that some of the " fixins " had been dropped, and Corporal Silvester would not draw the weight. The people surrounded the scales ia breathless expectancy, and when the scale was seen to turn and the weigher declared it all right, there went up such a cheer from the throats of the spectators as has not been heard since the late Lindsay Gordon sported silk at Coleraine.

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Bibliographic details

NOTES BY BEACON., Otago Witness, Issue 1851, 13 May 1887

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6,211

NOTES BY BEACON. Otago Witness, Issue 1851, 13 May 1887

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