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THE SPORTING WORLD

LONDON, September 21. THE TURF. . The idea that the racegoers included many shirkers was consider •,b. , y shaken during the recent Newmarket meeting, when the authorities closely " ran .lhe rule " over all visitors of military age. Jockeys, trainers, stable lads, race officials, and others all had to satisfy the military that they had good reason f'U not being in Uhaki. From 'h^ general results it is evi lent that there are few men attending race meetings who have not sound reasons for still being hi civilian garb. The Newmarket met- ting may not have proved quite so interesting as many expected, due to the fact that Fifinella could not fulfil her engagement. This wonderful filly and Derby winner has been amiss, and it is rather unlikely that she will run again during the present season. This is unfortunate, as in Hurry On she would have met a rival worthy of her speed. Mr James Buchanan's filly has now won four events in succession, and it may turn out a blessing that he could not be trained as a two-year-old. Wonderful two-year-olds are often big disappointments afterwards, the call on their immature powers preventing proper development. Numerous instances could be cited of this, whilst there are other illustrations of moderate juveniles developing into great four-year-olds, William the Third being a striking example. This is quite natural when one looks at it from a common-sense point of view, for horses are like athletes in some ways, and must feel the strain of excessive training. Everyone knows how Sceptre was beaten in the Derby through staleness, and no wonder, when she had been prepared for the Lincoln Handicap and then kept in training for the classics, all of which she Avon, save the Derby. To return to the winner of the wartime St. Leger, we shall have to wait patiently until next season for a possible test between the colt and the Derby winner. It Avould create much interest should the pair try conclusions in one of the Cup races of 1917, and the colt Avould have plenty of supporters. The other big event at Newmarket Avas the York Tavo Year Stakes, which was the substitute for the Gimcrack Stakes. . It Avas a happy idea to select the York Stakes as the name for the substitute, and quite appropriate, seeing that the York race meeting executive provided £200 towards the spoils. The event provided Knutsford Avith another Avin, and Mr E. Hulton's colt had an easy task, none of the other accepted cracks throwing down the gauntlet. BOXING. Most sportsmen know how Avell boxing is liked among our soldiers. No doubt the fact of it being possible to carry on the game even when right up at the front has a lot to do with its popularity. A feAv pairs of boxing gloves do not take up iruch room nor Aveigh much, which is a consideration. Then, again, a ring of sorts can be made almost anywhere, which is another point worth considering. "Apart from this, hoAvever, boxing is a game Avell suited to men of a fighting breed, and there is no doubt about the manly art being an excellent means to keep soldiers fit and amused. The spirit of our fighters was ably shoAvn by the holding ot a boxing tournament a few miles in the rear of the British line at the very time Ave were making an advance. The 'Sporting L'!a," of London, tells that four generals, 27.Q officers, and 2,000 of the rank and iii_ watched the contests, the chief beii-j; '.i---tween Corporal Jack Meekins and Pi:»v.te Bob Ritson, the latter being the Avelterweight champion of England, Avhilst Meekins was once at the top of the class. ( The pair met in 1912, Avhen Ritson gained the decision on points. The meeting under notice was at 15 rounds, and it proved a splendid one. Ritson had a bit the best of it. for 10 rounds, but Meekins then forced matters, and did Avell enough to just gain the award after one of the best bouts ever seen at the front, judging from all accounts. The loser wants another go, and, providing the enemy do not upset the present plans, the pair Avill probably meet for the rubber in a bout of 20 rounds. Turning to home eA T ents, one of the most important bouts recently held in London was between Lance-corpoTal Gibbs, of the 11th Hussars, and Leo Bedou, of France. The soldier forced matters to such purpose that Bedou was in difficulties early in the second round, and he avus virtually "out" wheii. his seconds gave in for him in the fourth round. SOLDIER SPORTSMEN. Prominent sportsmen are constantly figuring in tlie casualty and honors list. The recently wounded include Lieutenantcolonel W. Allason, D.5.0., of the Bedfordshire Regiment, who won the amateur plunging championship in 1896, 1897, 1902, 1908, and 1909. He was also.* a fine allround sportsman, his other distinctions including the title of best shot in the Aldershot command at one time. Another splendid all-round performer, in Lieutenant W. J. Cullen, Leinster Regiment, is among the Avounded. He played in the cricket eleven and the Rugby fifteen j for Christ's Hospital, and at the sports in 1913 Avon the hurdles, high jump, long j jump, throwing the cricket ball, and I weight-put. Then there is Captain H. J. H. Sibree, ! Norfolk Regiment, Avho played half-back I for England (1907, 1908, 1909), and Avhose j work on behalf of the Harlequins materially assisted that famous club tp retain a | prominent place in the Rugby woi'ld. An- j other wounded sportsman is E. Massey, a well-known member of the ■ Birchfield Harriers. He has been badly wounded in the' leg, -which had to be amputated just above the knee. This is hard luck on a man who has led an active life, and represented England in the international cross-country race. Massey was also a good man on the flat, and on one occasion finished third for the 10-mile championship. DECORATED. Other sportsmen have been more fortunate, and all who have come in contact with Sergeant P. G. Elsey, of the R.A.M.C. will be glad to hear that he has gained the Military Medal. He has done a lot for athletics and football in the Army in recent years, and also assisted the Surrey A.C. in many Avays. A London, athlete, in Lance-corporal T. 0. Church, of the Civil Service Regiment, and well known as an Essex Beagljjr, has also gained the Military Medal. He is a fine little sprinter, and has gained a place in the Essex 100 yards championship. BIG MEETINGS. Two big athletic meetings -.yere held on j Saturday at Birmingham and London respectively. Tlie .lor mer was for the benefit of the sportsmen's ambulance fund, Avith two match races between Private W. A. Applegarth and Jac* Donaldson as tlie star turn. 'Applegarth managed to . beat the Australian by a few inches in the 75 yards match, the time being Bsec, but the positions Avere reversed in the 100 yards race, Donaldson winning by a foot in 10|sec. In neither case can the time be considered good, but a heavy track was all (against fast time. The London A.C. meeting at Stamford Bridge provided some very interesting rae-

\ ing, several Avell-known performers joining I in. Tho A'eterans' 120 yards handicap went ) to D. Basan, Avho Avas running away back I in the eighties, and he shaped well to cover 111, yards in 12fsec. The open 100 I yards handicap was quite an international affair with Sergeant F. F. Schaefer, 40th Canadian Regiment, 4^ yards start, and Gunner H. Phillips, Canadian Field Force, 4_ yards start, among the heat winners. Neither got through the second round, however, whilst the final Avent to Sergeant Curtis, R.E., a veteran of 41, Avho had 10 yards start and got home in lOsec. Airmechanic V. D'Arcy, the old Polytechnic Harrier, ran very Avell in the final, as he Avas narrowly beaten from the short mark of 2£ yards start. PriA'ate C. J. Mears, of Australia, made a good bid for the 250 yards handicap, in Avhich he received 5 yards start. He Avas badly shut in at the last bend, but managed to run into third place with the watch showing 25|sec.

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Bibliographic details

THE SPORTING WORLD, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 602, 28 November 1916

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THE SPORTING WORLD Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 602, 28 November 1916

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