Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE OLD MAYOR AND THE NEW.

The increased''responsibility which the extension of the scope of municipal affairs involvles makes the filling of the civic office of Mayor a matter of the utmost importance'; therefore the mayoral installation, which.took place yesterday afternoon, carries with it a certain amount of significance. It is evidence of the real spirit of citizenship that year by year gentle-men of sterling character, of sound common sense, and of good business capacity should be found willing and able to fill the position in a manner reflecting the utmost credit both upon themselves and the city they represent, and this in spito of the somewhat severe criticism to which they are occasionally subjected. The acclamation with which the resolution thanking the retiring Mayor for his services to the city was carried at yesterday's function is only indicative of the practically universal feeling of the citizens, During his tenure of office Mr Braithwaite has spared neither time nor trouble in the transaction of municipal affairs, and in the peculiar difficulties he has been called upon to face he has evinced an amount of firmness and 1 foresight which, while surprising his best friends, has won the admiration of his severest critics. ' We can only touch upon a few of the main points mentioned by Mr Braithwaite in his retiring remarks and in which he succinctly reviewed the year's work. Owing to tlie complications arising out of the appointment of a new town clerk, Mr Braithwaite was for the greater part of his tenure of the civic chair considerably handicapped, and it says much for his care and energy that the course of- business ran so smoothly and with so little interruption. Tho late Mayor, too, has been consistent in his determination to reduce the Corporation's bank overdraft and to keep it within the reduced limit, and he deserves to be congratulated l upon the successful carrying out of this reform. The chief enterprise which "litis 'characterised Mr'l Braithwaite's mayoralty has been the practical completion of the tramways system, arid it is comforting to have his renewed assurance that the tramways will undoubtedly pay. Wo are at one with the retiring Mayor in his opinion. The reference made to the capable way in which Messrs Noyes Bros, have carried out.the tramways construction work and started the system in good running order was apropos and deserved. Of course, the crowning stone of the system—the Waipori scheme—remains to he completed, but about this also Mr

Braithwaite is optimistic, anil w« believe rightly so. The programme ne outlined appears soundly based—viz., tho salo of the electric power at the lowest possible rate, so as to popularise it and render its use universal. To this end certain differentiations in the charges made may be advisable. Despite the arguments advanced by Mr liraithwaite, we still adhere to the opinion that it would be a mistake to increase the municipal lialiiiity at present for the purpose of reticulating tho hill boroughs, This is a work which may well be allowed to proceed slowly, and for which Dunedin can afford to wait until municipal finance has emerged from tho period of present stress. The survey of the work of the past twelve months indulged in by the retiring Mayor will go far to convince the unbiassed ratepayer that tho city is in a fair way, under good management, to gradually free- itself from the somewhat heavy burden of financial responsibility—the result of rapid and unavoidable expansion— under which it has occasionally shown signs of staggering. Wo have every confidence that the programme outlined by the retiring Mayor will he carried to a successful issue by his successor ip office. The Mayor-elect, Mr G. Lawrence, has considerable cognisance born of long experience of tho affairs of tho city, and )ie has a reputation for practical work 'and carefulness which augurs well for the well-being of Dunedin during the ensuing year. The Mayor-eleot in tho discharge of his duties may rely upon that co-operation from the body of citizens which his unopposed election presupposes, and we predict for Mr Lawrence a useful and successful term of office.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19060503.2.26

Bibliographic details

THE OLD MAYOR AND THE NEW., Otago Daily Times, Issue 13583, 3 May 1906

Word Count
688

THE OLD MAYOR AND THE NEW. Otago Daily Times, Issue 13583, 3 May 1906

Working