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SUICIDE OF MR H. BUNNY.

(Fee United Fehss Association.)

Wellington, February 10.

Inspector Thompson has received a telegram that Mr Henry Buauy, tho well-known politician, shot himself dead in the Town Board office, at Featherston yesterday. Death waa mstautaner.ua. He had been in a despondent state lately in consequence of his defeat at the general election. He also keenly felt tho death of his old chief, Sir William Fitzherbert.

Additional particulars to hand show that Mr Bunuy committed suicide yesterday between noon aud 7.30 p.m. At 11.45 am. ho asked Constable Smith, of Featberston, where ho could got tho key of tho Board office. On being informed deceased went where he was directed, having refused the constable's offer to get it for him. At 7.30 Daniel Eyan, Mr Bunny's servant, came and inquired for him, stating that he had not been hooie since tho morning. Constable Smith ascertained that the key had not been returned, and, with Ryan, went to the office and found Mr Bunny sitting in a chair—dead and cold. In the front of his clothes there was an open shot wound over the heart, and a small five-chambered revolver was lying on the floor, two cartridges from it having apparently been recently discharged. Deceased's attitude was peaceable, and showed that ho suffered death without a struggle. No one in the neighbourhood heard tho shot fired.

(Fbom Oub Own ConnESPONDENT.)

Wellington, February 16.

The late Henry Bunny, cx-M.H.R, whose shocking suicide created a deep sensation in Wellington on the news being received to-day, arrived in New Zaaland in 1854, and settled in the Rangitikei district for a short time, but purchasing a property in the fertile Wairarapa valley, he removed thither, and has since resided in the neighbourhood of Featherston. He held a seat in the early Provincial Council, and was Provincial Treasurer during the time of the late Sir Win. Fitzherbert's Superintendency of Wellington province. On the Bth March 1866 Mr Bunny was elected as representative for Wairarapa in the House of Representatives, and held his ecat continuously up to the time he was defeated by Mr W. 0. Buchanan in the election of 1884. When the Abolition of the Provinces Act was passed in 1875, to come into force the following year, Mr Bunny was appointed Superintendent of Wellington province until it should come into operation. In the year 1874 the inhabitants of Featherston having failed to choose a representative to sit on the old Education Board, Mr Bunny was called to the board, and he continued an active and moat energetic member of the board up to the time of his lamentable death. Mr Bunny took an active part also in the military operations of the early days, and on the 6th November 1868 he was appointed a Major in theNewZfialandMi;itio,and on the 15th January 1882 he was appointed officer commanding the Wairarapa district, but this position he resigned in 1889 on account of being over the stipulated age. Besides his connection with the Education Board Mr Bunny had for years, and wa; at the time of his death, attached to tho Board of the College and High School Governors, the Land Board, local town and road boards, Charitable Aid, and other bodies, in all of which he was looked upon as a most valuable, and certainly was a most energetic and hardworking member. Latterly, however, the old gentleman had begun to lose a good deal of his wonted cheerfulness and seemed depressed in spirits. Sir Wm.Fitzherbert having become Speaker of the Houbb of Representatives, the duty of winding up provincial affairs devolved jupon Mr Bunny, and he performed the tusk with great ability. In the House of Representatives he was for years one of the best parliamentary tacticians the House has ever known. In politics Mr Bunny vjaß an advanced Liberal: He was not a frequent speaker, but was an unwearied lobbyist. When some years ego_ Wairarapa rejected him as a representative in favour of Mr BuchanaD, general surpriso was felt. Mr Buchanan, howover, has since proved the victor in several other combats with Mr Bunny, beating him finally in December last. Since then a movement was initiated in the district to recognise Mr Bunny's services by a substantial testimonial, and this would no doubt have been done had he lived. At the last meeting of the Education Board three months' leave of absence was granted to Mr Bonny, but not apparently from illhealth, as in writing to the secretary of the board on the matter, he said he would see him about the end of this isonth. Mr Bunny was twice married. Ho leaves a widow and a large family, most of whom are grown np. One of hia daughters is married to Mr Edward Riddeford, of the Hutt, another to Judge Broad, of Nelson, another is the widow of a Mr Shapter, and there is one unmarried. Mr C. E. Bunny, barrister and solicitor, whose sad death from typhoid fever, occurring almost immediately after his able defenco of Louis Chemis, charged with the Kaiwarra murder, was the third son of the deceased gentleman. Mr A. R. Bunny, of Masterton, and Mr E. P. Bunny, of this city, are both eons of his. The sudden death of Mr C. B. Bunny was a graat Bhock'to his father, who has scarcely been the same man sine?. The recent deaths of hia old friends Sir W. Fitzherbert and Mr J. 0. Brown, also deeply affected him. His life is stated to have been insured for a considerable Bum.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18910217.2.15

Bibliographic details

SUICIDE OF MR H. BUNNY., Otago Daily Times, Issue 9041, 17 February 1891

Word Count
923

SUICIDE OF MR H. BUNNY. Otago Daily Times, Issue 9041, 17 February 1891

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