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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 29.

In the Provincial Council yesterday, The Proa'lncial Secretary moved the appointment of a Select Committee cm the management of the Roads Department. the Provincial Treasures seconded the motion. Mr Vogel itoved an amendment that a Select Committee be appointed to inquire into the genera' financial affairs of the Province. He proposes the amendment fn- two reasons, tie objeetei to the constitution of the Commute, and he objected to the .mode in which the inquiry was limited. The revelations made concerning the financial management of the Roads department rendered it quite possible r-imi-lav irregularities might l>3 discovered io other departments.tie considered that if the irregularities had arisen from the defeetiveuess of the system, it was the duty of the Provincial Treasurer to have reformed that system. It was no excuse that the system had been , constituted some time ago, and had not proved equal to the demand. Mr Hardy seconded the amendment. ' The Provincial Treasurer said if the am-nd-nient was earned he should res'gn— not from any fear of investigation, for he was sure the accounts of the Treasury were in good order. He defended the manner in which the Estimates wero made up, as being the system adopted throughout the colony. Mr Gillies concurred in the 'ameadment, if fair and legitimate inquiry was intended ; but he would 1 not suppo: t a vote of censure. Mr Rennie approved of the amendment. Mr Moss felt compelled to vote against the amendment. The Provincial Secretary .hoped the House would not support the amendment. The House then divided, and the amendment was negatived by 22 to 8. ----- After some discussion a3 to the constitution of the committee, the motion was put and carried. The House went into committ.e on the Land Resolutions. ''■'" :;••:--■ ■-;.. •, : r . ; Mr Vogel' spoke at -some length, and advocated the adoption of an' upset pi-ice DfL2 per acre;: 'He believed the only way to> prevent speculation waa to se'l the land at it 3 iair value. ■'■■■ -He drew attention lothe loss that would accrue-to the revenue, and he considered restrictive clauses useless. Major Richardson supported the one-pound per acre upset price as most likely to promote the settie^ 'inent of the country. The penal improvement c' ause should be made, effective.. He considered the system ?of Hundreds a valuable one. .• . . ._■ * , Mr PiNKERToa advocated the adoption'of a fixed: price free from restrictive conditions.. MrJ. Cargill would oppose--selling land at one pound per acre unless conditions ,wers imposed. - ; Mr Brodie spoke in favor of one pound per acre, and a tax on unimproved lands. After further discussion,'' the amendment of Major .Richardson was put, "Ylfot the land be sold at an I upset pries of one pbunl per acre", with" conditions of improvements," atid. was carried by 22 to 11. On the discussion of the thiiil clause of the reso-: lutions that a Crown! grant should at once be piven on the payment of land,,but that a tax should b; imposed on unimproved land, ■■-,-■• Mr Dick considered-the clause the strength of the resolution, and would Lave preferred to make the penal clauses retrospective; : The clause waa adopted;' and the" House having resume i, adjourned at eleven o'clock to four o'Jiock on Monday. ■ • ' • ' The discussion on Mr Pinkerton's motion for the offer of a Bonus for the introduction of the Alpaca into Otago, amply illustrated a great'want in this province of which we made mention some time back. We mean a public institution or society charged with the collection and diffusion of correct information as to the resources and capabilities of pur soil and climate. The mover of the resolution, fully impressed with the commercial value of the Alpaca, and no doubt supposing that every one else must be equally, sensible of the fact, neglected to arm himself with the authorities and.statistical data necessary to make out a " case" to convince the incredulous. The seconder of the proposal had equally left his figures behind him, anticipating, we suppose, that nothing more would be necessary to gain the concurrence oi the-House than to remind it of the enormous wealth which the Alpaca had been the means of creating for other countrie-, the large deaiand that exists for the Alpaca wool in England, and the special adaptability to the. habits of the animal of large tracts of land in this Province almost worthless for other purposes. These general statements of facts, however, proved insufficient to overbear the opposition the proposal encountered. It was alleged that the Province had at present no money to spare for the purpose—an argument which reminds us something ludicrously of a similar plea lately urged by an illustrious senator in another colony, that the finances were so low it "could " not afford to pay for the discovery of a gold " field." Besides; all pleas of the insufficiency of means at command to purchase real substantial benefits for the Province, sound oddly enough after recent financial revelations, and the attitude the Executive and the majority of the Council have taken upon the subject of the public expenditure for the last four months. Seeing how largely the income of the Province has been exceeded by its outlay ; how keenly the iust demand of the House for a detailed account of the expenditure is resented; and how irregularly conducted some large monetary transactions have been;: we cannot for a moment believe that this plea of impecuniosity would have been urged, if the Council had been at; all sensible of the important results likely to accrue from the in-, troduction of this valuable animal. There was no ground for anticipating the amount of ignorance that was displayed; but the ignorance was there; and, as is not uncommon, it called to its aid the weapons of ridicule. Some of the speakers waxed very funny—at least, judging from the laughter indulged in. The idea that the alpaca was less subject than the ordinary sheep to some of the diseases- by which flocks are often decimated, waa derided as preposterous. And the whole discussion became at last so jocular, that the grave ceremony of a division was omitted, and the motion dropped. A very different result would probably have attended it, if any machinery had been in operation to spread a sound and reliable knowledge of the subject. It was said that the experiment to acclimatise the alpaca-in New South Wales had not been attended with all the success that was anticipated. But even. admitting that'-to be a fact, no explanation of it whatever \yas offered. We knov; that Mt\ Ledger has Keen accused of incapacity Jn the management of the flock of imported animals. We Know that tfie experiment of

naturalising them was made on some of the fattest pasture lands of the colony. In these circumstances may we not find the whole explanation of what is called the partial success of the Sydney experiment? It was on the points alleged in support of the motion which had special reference to the snitahility to the alpaca of the climate and of much of the waste land of this province, that the House needed mere information than was laid hefore it. As to the value of the alpaca wool in England, we believe that no fair test has ever been obtained. Without dwelling upon the increased value imparted to all material capable of being worked up into textile fabrics, by the partial destruction-of the cotton manufacture, we may refer to the remarkable statement made some years back by one of the most eminent woollen manufacturers of England — Mr. Titus Salt—that the alpaca wool would increase in market value in proportion to the extent and regularity of its supply. It was at present, that gentlemen said ia effect, available in such limited quantities only that it had to be mixed sparingly with inferior material, which immensely detracted from the beauty of the woven texture. Ii fabrics of the pure alpaca wool could be thrown into the market, in sufficient quantity to create and feed a regular demand for them, the manufacturer would be in a position to buy largely at a price far higher than that now ruling. We are not desirous, however, of making too much of this lost motion. The great difficulty of procuring the animal, so long jealously guarded against exportation by the South American governments, has been overcome. A flock of alpacas, in a healthy condition and exhibiting already a remarkable I fecundity, is in New South Wales. We shall be able to import them thence when their value gets to be properly understood. We merely cite the very unsatisfactory discussion which terminated in the rejection of Mr Pinkerfcon's motion on Thursday, as an illustration, exceli lently apropos, of our want of an Association or Institute of > Practical Art and Science, aiming :at enlisting the knowledge and energies of .able and, public spirited men in the service of the province, and the development of its material interests and capabilities. What a lesson.of reproof is read to us by the story of onr neighbors' doings, in connection with the. culture ot -the vine and cotton plant, the acclimatisation of the silk worm, the introduction of the salmon, the establishment oi 'new.forms of manufacturing industr}', and a hundred Other cognate objects! This Province has its specialties as well as others, and it is equally dependent with others upon imported forms of life and industry. In various shapes the ! system of Bonus is elsewhere resorted to, either in votes of money, grants of land, or the concession of exclusive privileges. The Colonies of Australia have been largely indebted to this policy for the development of many great interests. Within certain judicious limits, it might be advantageously pursued here. But we want knowledge. It would be unwise to lavish money upon illdirected experiments, based upon uncertain data. A careful examination of the rivers of Victoria, leaves it still a doubtful point whether their temperature is not too high to render practicable the sudden introduction to them of the salmon, accustomed to the colder waters of Northern Europe. That fact being ascertained, thousands of pounds have been saved that might otherwise have been spent in fruitless and disheartening experiments, and the more prudent course Has been adopted of assisting the Tasmanian Government in introducing the salmon into the Derwent as a preliminary measure. Some organisation for inquiries of this nature, the collection of information, and the collation of evidence, might thus plainly serve two useful ends. It would point out the directions in which we may safely tread in the path of experiment, and it would warn us from those to. pursue which would only lead us into failure and fruitless waste of money. We are anxious to keep the idea before the public, in the hope that in some moment of happy inspiration it will be acted upon. If such an Association had been in existence it is probable that the proposal to encourage the introduction of the alpaca might have met with a different fate.

The Christy's Minstrels had a good house last night, and the performances lacked none of the humor and ability which have hitherto characterised them. We would, however, ask why so little variety in the part singing is given? We are sure the repertoire of the Minstrels is sufficiently extensive to afford us something be side the inevitable " Spring's delights," beautiful as it is. We might also remind the violoncellist that, however attractive playing on one string may be, few people care night after night to listen to one tune.

Miss Aitken's farewell readings at the OWfellows' Hall, last evening, were attended by a crowded audience". The selection of subjects was a.most, judicious one, combining, as it did, the grave and gay, and affording opportunities for the cispla'y of the varied powers of the fair elocu tionist. Oi Miss Aitken's abilities as an actress, we have before had the pleasure of speaking; as a reader, she is equally true and artistic, and.wcwere agreeably surprised to find that she divested her .." ;reading" of dramatic passages of the stageisms which others seem to be never able to, cast off. She never failed to carry the audience with her, and we hesitate not to say that many a familiar passage winch Miss xYitken recited last night, received to many of her hearers a new interpretation, felt to be a true one. O; Miss Aitken's efforts last nighfc, we would more especially make favorable mention of her selection from "Henry the Eighth"—the trial oi "Queen Katherine ; and a selection from the "Caudle Lectures "-Caudle becomes a Mason. The dramatic.reading was a model of ease and style ; the mirth pi ovoking sketch of Jerrold was given with so much of geniality and faithfulness that the room was kept in a roar of laughter during the whole of the recital. The other pieces- were all equally well given, and the whole entertainment was a most enjoyable one. We are sorry it was a '.'farewell" performance.

We are glad to be in a position to state that the reported snowing up of 500 men at Campbell's gully, proves to have been exaggerated. The Government have placed; in our hands for publication the following letter from Mr Warden Robinson, who had been communicated with on the subject : — " Mount Benger Gold Field,

Miller's Flat, August 20, 1863, 1 o'clock p.m. Sir—l have the honor to acknowledge receipt per police messengers of your letter (of number and date as per margin) in reference to a report that 500 men have been snowed in at Campbell's diggings, and directing me to take steps to render assistance in case such should be required. In reply I have the honor to state fhat I have every reason to believe that the report, although not altogether without foundation, is a gross exaggeration of the actual facts. These are, as nearly as 1 can learn, as follows:— A number of miners have for some time back been in the habit of leaving their claims on the river, and of going to Campbell's and the Pomahawk diggings for a week or so at a time. Most of these men have left mates on the river, and. some have been continually going and coming between the two places, packers have also been constanlly taking over provisions from the stores-at the Teviot. By the late severe snow storms the free communication over the range to the Pomahawk was for" a day or two interrupted, and in the storm some lives were lost I have held inquests on the bodies of two men lost on the range, and of one killed by a small avalanche. Some of the packers had to leave their loading on the hills and return to save their lives ; since the storm, however, these men have been able to take their loading on to the Pomahawk, and I feel satisfied that if the track to Campbell's had been still impassable, I should have had some information on the subject. Acting, however, in the spirit; rather than to the i latter of your instructions, I shall/in case of any instances of danger to life from snow, coming; to my knowledge, not hesitate to-take such measures as may seem to me to be necessary, whether the locality be Campbell's Diggings or'anywhere else. I have the honor to be, < Sir, your obedient servant, (signed) H. W. Robkson.—-The Secretary Gold Fields' Department, Dunedin. The single handed Skiff Race for the Champion ship of Dunedin, between Jacob. Tumbull of Dunedin, and William Bowie of Port Chalmers, will take place this day (Saturday), at half-past two p.m,. The start will be from the New Jetty round a boat moored of Black Jack's Point. A number of minor races are to come oft; so rthere will be no lack of amusement for the lovers of aquatic sports. " We understand that the Congregationalista have purchased the Section ia Moray-Place, at the corner of View street, as the site for the'intended Congregational Church. The situation is I very eligible, and it is to be hoped they will put up a structure upon it that will be creditable alike to them and Dunedin. We believe they are mailing an effort to increase their funds, .so that they may at once build in stone or brick, and not of wood. All who are interested in Dunedin must rejoice to see wood discarded, for public buildings especially. The Rev. R. Connebee, of ! Kew, well-known and respected in that pleasant suburb of Melbourne, has accepted the invitation to settle here as their Minister, and is expected to arrive in three or four weeks. A specimen of a comparatively: rare bird-was secured by Mr Liddell, of the Harbor Department, while in attendance yesterday upon the Victory's passengers located on Rabbit Island. He picked up a penguin, not of the ordinary Jype found along the Tasmauian coast, but what is known as an Ichaboe penguin y this specimen resembling much the penguin which frequents the Echaboe Islands. With this addition to a.number of kangaroos, and other importations from Tasmania, Port Chalmers is at present in the possession of the nucleus of a very promising menagerie. The following particulars embrace the substance of the latest leports from the Gold. Fields' Wardens :—Manuherikia : population, 2000. Tho snow on the " Old Man " Range is reported as being very severe, and the route to Campbell's almost impassable. Several men have been found dead, and others have been brought into, the township in a very helpless state from frost bite. The population of the Wakatipu gold field is estimated as being 2830, of whom 2060 are miners. The Warden has little mining news Ito report; the weather during the week had been beautifully floe and the miners were in good spirits. There had been a great many objections against the new race at Arthur's Point, which is to cost a large sum of money. They were heard and determined at the Wardens Court. The race which was destroyed by the recent floods, cost £7900, and the construction of another equally expansive, speaks well for the confidence of the shareholders in their ground. The population of the Arrow River District is stated as being 2450, of whom 1969 are miners. A heavy fallof snow I had followed on the fine weather which had .prevailed; and the subsequent thaw had caused the roads to be iv a fearful state. Apprehensions were again fell; as to the rising of che river, and'in consequence many had knocked' off work, whilst others had determined to run the risk of a flood, and remain at their claims. Nothing had been done as to the drainage of the Flat, but great hopes were entertained-of ultimate success. One ward of the new hospital had been ipened, and upwards of 25 patients admitted Hie population of the Mount Benger district is* reported as being 950, of whom 700 are miners. The river had fallen a little, and more ground iiad been rendered available for working. The tall had not been very regular, owing to the creeks having been flooded by the melting: of the snow on the hills. These floods had caused travelling to be not only disagreeable but difficult md even dangerous. More cases of loss of life in che late snow storms were still coming to light. On Monday an inquest was held on the body of a man named Alexander Alexander, who was smothered m his tent at .the-Poraahaka by an avalanche. Another man named William iSTichol } \s reported as found dead on the way from the Gorge Ferry to Campbell's Diggings. The number of water racss ia this district is continually on the increase, Most of the small creeks liave been taken up, aad there are now three races drawing water from, the Teviot stream, and a fourth is applied for. The population of the District of Gabriel's is stated at I ibout 2000, of whom 1303 are miners. The inclemency of the weather had retarded mining operations, but the district is reported by the Warden as being in a highly satisfactory state As an instance of this, a detailed statement is* given of the operations of ten parties on the spur of Weatherstone's. The population of the Waitahuna district is returned at 102S ; the minin^ news is quite unimportant. The population oa the Nokomai is stated to be 160, of whom 150 are miners ; and there are 500 persons on Switzer'a diggings, of whom 450 are actual miners. A new rush is reported on a spur on the Nokomai, known as Welshman's Spur. Several men have set in there, and are doing well. The population at the ffokomar is steadily increasing ; many miners who had lost their all on. the S&o^ZvTcZl lown to recruit, and are stated by the Warden to have fair prospects.of success.

Captain Murray, of the river steamer Tuap-ka .ras been very handsomely entertained by the settlersin the Clutha district- A correspondent who accompanied the Tuapeko on her second trip writes ;— <• Since Monday vre have made one trip

up the Matau brancli, some six inil';s above Kaitangata, without any difficulty, returning to the ; Molyneux township on Tuesday morning to take up the people for the grand dinner given to . Capt. Murray at the Perry. For tin out-of-the-way, place like this, the dinner was really a grand affair. The room was full, and many wishing tickets could not be admitted. Sixty sat down to dinner, and the spread was as good as Puncdin could have produced. The chair was occupied by Mr James Maitland, E,M. ; the vicechair by Mr Ferguson. The usual toasts having been given, the Chairman gave the health of the guest of the evening, a toast which was received with extraordinary demonstations of respect. Captain Murray made an appropriate reply. During the evening the Chairman read a ietter from Major llichardson intimating his regret that he could not be present to do honor to the pioneer of the navigation of the Molynenx. With a congenial party, the time was spsnt most pleasantly, and, about the small "hours, the company separated, On the following 'morning, the Tunpeka left for the Tuapeka junction, with hopes of as good, success as on the first trip, though' a change in the circumstances was caused by the river having fallen three feet since the navigation was opened. Mr Warden Croker has furnished to the Government a detailed statement of the result of the operations of ten parties of miners working on the spur at Wctherstone's. Number 1 party, consisting of four men,-the depth of sinking 20 • feet, and the depth of wash dirt 5 feet, averaged . 2oz sdwts of gold per man per week. Party No. 2, of three men, depth of sinking. 40 feet, and 10 feet of wash dirt obtained an average of loz 10 dwtsperman per week, No. 3 party, of four men, 10 feet sinking, 2 feet of wash dirt, ob- . tamed loz lOdwts per man per week. Party No. 4, of four men, 18 feet sinking, and three . feet wash dirt, realised Soz per man per weekNo. 5,' party of/ four men, 30 feet sinking and six-feet of \issh dirt, obtained 2oz sdwts per man per week ; No. G, party ot three men, 25 feet sinking and 5 feet of wash dirt, obtained 2oz per man per week ; No. 7, party of three men, 30 feet sinking 2 feet wash dirt, obtained 2oz 15dwts per man per week ; (S No. 8, party of four men, 20 feet finking and 4 feet of wash dirt, obtained loz 15dwts per man per week ; No 10 party, con.uistingof five men, 25 fecfc sinking, 6 feefc of wash ■ dirt, realised £10 sterling per week per man. ' The arrangements of the emigrant ship British Crown, .".which has • lately arrived at Ly ttelton, bringing the first consignment of immigrants flhipped under the supervision cf her Majesty's • -Emigration Commissioners, are said to have been ih'eyery way so satisfactory and so much superior to anything previously experienced, that it is strongly urged the that future immigration an angements should be entrusted to the Royal Commiseioners, in lieu of the Provincial Agent. ■ The condition of the gold fields of Victoria and the amendments in the present laws and regulations affecting miners have, for some time past, been under investigation by a Board of Commissioners. Their report, which has just been published, is very voluminous, but the Argus furnishes the following condensed resume of its contents :— "The long-expected report of the Eoyal Commissioners to the gold fielis was placed in the hands of Ministers last night. The recommendations they makemay be summarised as follows:—That there should be a uniform code of mining laws fo r each class of mining in the colony; clear definitions of miniDg titles; greater fixity of tenure ; substitution of fine for forfeiture of claims or leases ; a reduction in the rents, and a return to the practice of quarterly paymsuts in advance for mining leases, and a reduction in the fee for a miner's rigli*;; the appointment of inspectors of mines ; the improvement of the mining survey system : better water supply for the gold fields ;. immediate legislation for mining on private property; an effective law oa the subject; of limited liability in mining partnerships f that the Warden should have concurrent jurisdiction with the Court of Mines in partnership dis. putes ; the extension of the powers of the Court of Mines ; the appointment of an appellant jud^e of the Supreme Court to hear mining appeals ; the granting of more liberal areas foi' residences on the gold fields ; revision of the law and regulations relating to patents.; encouragement to bond fide prospecting for gold and other metals or minerals ; tho abolition of the mining boards ; the complete re-organisation of a mining depa f ment under a responsible Minister ; the establishment of a school of mines in connection witli the National Mining Museum; and, generally, a more speedy and less costly adjudication upon, and settlement of mining disputes, &c." The following despatch from his Grace the Duke of Newcastle, with reference to the relations between the Colonial Volunteer and Militia forces to the Queen's Government, has just been laid on the table of the Melbourne House of "Assembly. It is not without interest in this colony, and we may presume indeed that it is a circular despatch, a copy of which has been forwarded to bis Excellency Sir Geo. Grey simultaneously with the one addressed to Sir Henry Barkly :—"Downing-street, 6th April, 1863. Sir,—My attention has recently been called to the expediency of defining the relations which ought to subsist between the Government of a British colony and the colonial militia end volunteers. Her Majesty's Government are of opinion .'. that the test and most constitutional mode of dealing with the question will be to follow strictly, in regard to all colonial volunteers, the general principles on which the volunteer system rests in this country. Under that system, the iord-lieutenant of each county/as the Queen's representative, is the commander-in-chief of the whole.force of county volunteers, so long as they are not called out for active service ; while, as soon as they are called out, they come under the Mutiny Act and Articles of War, and pass from the chief command of the lord lieutenant to that ■of the'general officer of the district. Acting on this analogy, therefore, it is very desirable that the Governor of each colony where millitia or volunteers exist should, as the Queen's representative, be constituted" by law the commandeivin--1 chief of all local forces raised in that colony, and that all arrangements connected with the organization, drill, and discipline of such forces should within. the limits of the act of the Legislature under which they are established, be made by his authority through such officers as he may appoint. Provisions to this effect are already in force in Canada and other colonies, and if they are not already adopted in the colony under your government. I should wish you to embrace the. earliest practicable opportunity of procuring their enactment/ Whenever this. is effected, the local colonial force will occupy their proper constitutional position, and a better guarantee for their efficient organisation and good discipline will be secured than can be afforded under any other feasible arrangement In recommending that the English analogy should be . followed, I wish you to understand clearly that although the lord lieutenant of a county is formally the commander of the county force, and in

th>it capacity exercises a general superintendence over its arrangements, and practically .appoints the officers., he does not take the command of the force when called out for duty, even iti time of peace, nor interfere in the ordinary discipline of each corps within his jurisdiction.—l have, &c, Neavcastus." The Chief Postmaster advertises for tenders for the conveyance for six months of mails to and from steamers arriving oIF Dunedin. Tenders to be sent in on or before the ath September. Tae Ballarat Slar of the 12th instant has the.1 following:—" A novel enterprise has been started by Messrs Suodgrass and Co., of Queen street; Melbourne, namely, the exportation of slaughtered sheep to New Zealand, where good fat sheep are worth L 2 5s each. The first lot of fifty, as an experiment, Avas put on board the steamer Aldinga in strong wire cages on deck, in which the sheep were strung up as in a butcher's shop. It is calculated that the trade can be carried on for six months in the year—from March to August. The idea appears to have arisen from the fact of the steamers talcing their own fresh meat, and should the experiment succeed a profitable opening will be found for some of our settlers' surplus fat stock.'* An advertisement in another column announces that Grand High Mass Aviil be celebrated at the Catholic Church, to-morrow at half-past'eleven o'clock, when a collection will' be made in aid of the funds of the Church. ■ The ReA'. Mr Poole of Melboiirne, avlio has visi-ted-Dunedin for the purpose of promoting the establishment of a Baptist Church, is announced to preach to-morrow at the Court House, at 11 o'clock, and in Dr Burn's Church at halt-past six. A. meeting of the members of the Jewish community is called by advertisement for to-morrow afternoon, at the Oddfellows Hall, for the appointment of salaried and other officers, for the ensuing year, and for the consideration of the general affairs of the denomination. We understand that a very handsome sum has been colleciel for the erection of the neAv Synagogue and the purchase of an eligible freehold site for it.

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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 29., Otago Daily Times, Issue 528, 29 August 1863

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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 29. Otago Daily Times, Issue 528, 29 August 1863

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