Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

KENNEL NOTES

(By "Fitzroy.") OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WELLINGTON KENNEL CLUB. Correspondencs is invited from canine fanciers and others interested m this column.. Letters will be treated confidentially, and uuestions answered (through tho column) at the earliest opportunity. Correspondents aro requested to sign their names, but a iiom <le plume may also be used it necessary. Letters should reach this office not later than Wednesday for reply in tho following Friday's issue. In response to a rqiuest by a number of Conker Spaniel enthusisats I publish this week a diagram of a Cocker together with the latest liritish standard as alopled by tho Cocker Spaniel Club (England. Tho hon. secretary of tho English Club is G. Penson Wbitaker, < ,iaji .'ii'vn, Uresford, near Chester, iiiigland. Expression sometimes counts much for or against a dog. The expression of a dog is determined by the size, colour, and placement of the eye. For instance, in a St Bernard the eye is «iuall, somewhat sunken, showing a little haw (the red membrane inside the lower eyelid). This gives a mild and benevolent expression. The ''varmint" expression of the foxterrier is a characteristic produced by the eye which is free from haw, is not sunken, nor large, and set in, in a somewhat horizontal position, giving a keen expression. "What is meant by the' words 'roachback'?" asks "Master Sou!t,"(Palmerskm North). A roach-back is the arched or wheel formation of the loin as in a greyhound, bulldog, dachshotind, and Uandie Dinmont terrier. "Morrow" (Island Bay) writes:—"l am about to select a young pug puppy from a

litter. Both the sire and dam. are pedigreed winners, and 1 believe the pups will turn out fairly good specimens if quality of breeding counts. 1 would like you to give me a few hints to assist me in my selection." 11l reply, tho points "Morrow" should look for are—a square face, small ears, full dark eyes, straight legs, curly tail, black mask, black or ttark line down the spine, black toe-nails, and short coat.

The Dunedin Fanciers' Club's prize schedule for the annual show, to be held on Juno 17th, 18th, and 19th, is in circulation.

A committee meeting of the Wellington Kennel Club is referred to in another column.

The Ladies' Kennel Club of New South Wales, at their last general meeting, decided on admitting gentlemen as associate members, and already about twenty have been admitted. The club will still be worked by a committee of ladies, as before. The L.K.C. also contemplate holding a parade of dogs in June, r. plain and fancy dress ball in July, and* the second annual championship show early in September.

Mr F. E. Watson, proprietor of the Wharekoki Bulldog Kennels, Palmerston North, writes to Mr E. T. Taylor, of Courtenay place, AVellington, that his Wharekoki Solo has whelped to Kilbirnie Conqueror, without any trouble, nine puppies. Tho dam is rearing e'i:ht of the litter, which are the strongest and healthiest lot of pups Mr "Watson has seen. There is not a "squeaker" in the lot. Mr Watson says it is too early yet to say what they will turn out. The colours aro wonderfully mixed. One is all white, others are fawns, pieds, and two are dark brindles, like Kilbirnie Conqueror himself.

"Ortona" (city) writes a somewhat pointed letter, into which he introduces personalities, concerning a well-known figure in doggy circles. Personal criticisms are out of place in this column. "Ortona" must forward full name and address if he desires to get a hearing. Two correspondents draw attention to a statement in last week's notes in which it is stated that the cocker, spaniel has a very "bushy" tail. Those who know a little about the cocker will recognise the word "bushy" as an obvious error. 'The word was a misprint and should havo been "busy." Tho cocker spaniel works his tail incessantly when on the scent, and thus is ant to injure it if it were not shortened by the operation known as "docking." Some time' ago a- Cocker Spaniel Standard w.as being published in various colonial papers in which it was stated that "the total weight should not exceed 301 b." The English club's reference to weight reads "should not exceed 251 b." Somebody in the colonies has been altering tho reference to weight to suit "misfits." In Vero Shaw's book "How to Choose a Dog" (revised and brought up to r'.ate by Thco. Jlnrples) a fairly concise description of the Cocker Spaniel is given, as follows: —The Cocker Spaniel is built on rather different lines to the '"'-ixirni l »n"- 'n .-.-■"-.-1-' v„ t 0 his wrjght, higher on the leg and shorter in the body. He is an active, merry litle fellow, very useful in the field, and very n e n cli n w r'nrr np,l ~,- companion. In head he should resemble a miniature Field Spaniel, though the muzzle is rarely so square at tho -end," the enrs should be Ti low. nml free from curl. In body he should be only moderately long, and more he'ght in pvorKirtio" to his size is allowed in the Cocker Spnniel than would be considered correct in the Field Spaniel. The f"»-t .•"*<! fsßtli-'-in<r 'tp as in the Fi-'d Spaniels, and the colours are the same. Roans in Cockers are more popular than ,uu uiiOie co.oui>, wliicii is tlie opposite in the case/or Field Spaniels. Average weight—Full-grown dog. 25lbsi bitch. 2SHhs; our>pvl2 months old, 20lbs;' D montho, 171bs: C months, 1411>s: 3 months, 8 lbs; 6 weeks old. 4- lbs. Points to look for in a puppy six weeks old— Compactness, -a straight coat, well develops! muzzle, and e»r.s set on low. Six months old—ln addition to the above,

straight legs, rdentv of bone, dark eves, and correct setting of the tail. Aver- | ace age at which tho breed arrives at maturity: eighteen months. THE BLACK COCKER SPANIEL. The following are the points and description laid down by the Cocker Spaniel Club (England): Descriptive Particulars-Head: Not so heavy in proportion and not so high in occiput as in the modern Field Spaniel, with a nicely developed muzzic or jaw . lean, but not snipcy, and yet lipt w square as in the Clumber or hu,sex varieties, but always exhibiting a sufficiently wide and rounded well-developed skull, with plenty of room lor brain P Eyes*.—Full hut not prominent, hazel' or brown coloured, witb a general expression of intelligence and gentleness though decidedly wide-awake, bright and merry never gozzled nor weak as in. the King' Charles and Blenheim kinds. Eais—Lobular, set on low, leather fins and not extnding beyond the nose well clothed with long, silky hair, which must be straight or wavy-no positive vurls or ringlets. Neck.—Strong and muscular, ana neatly set on to Una sloping shoulders. Body (including size and symmetry).— Not quite so long and low as. m other breeds of Spaniels, more compact and firmly knit together, giving the cmpression of a concentration of power and untiring activity. Tho total weight snould not exceed 25lbs. Nose.— Sufficiently wldo and well developed to insure the exquisite scenting powers of this breed. Colour, black. Shoulders and Chest.-The ormer sloping and fine, chest deep and well developed, b-.it not too wide and round to interfere with the free action of the fore-legs. Back and Loin.—lmmensely strong and compact in proportion to the size and weight of the dog; slightly drooping towards the tail. Hindquarters—Wide, well rounded and very muscular, so as to insure untiring action and propelling power under tho most trying circumstances of a long day, bad weather, rough ground, and dense covert. . . Stern (tail).—That most characteristic of blue blood in all the Spaniel family may, in the lighter and more, active

Cocker, although set Ion: down, he'allowed a slightly higher carnage than in the other breeds, hut never cocked j up over, but rather in a line with the j back although the lower its carriage and action the better, and when at work its action should he incessant in this, the brightest and merriest of. the whole Spaniel family. Feet and Legs.—The legs must be woll boned, feathered ,and straight, for tho tremendous exertions expected from this grand little sporting dog, and should -be sufficiently short for concentrated power, but not too short as to interfere with its full activity. Feet firm, round, and cat-like, not too large, spreading and' loose jointed. This distinct breed of Spaniel does not follow exactly on tho lines of the larger Field Spaniel, either in lengthiness, lowness, or otherwise, but be shorter in back, or otherwise higher on the legs. Coat.—Flat or waved, and silky in texture, never wiry, woolly, nor curly, with sufficient feather of the right sort, viz., waved or Setter-like, but not too profuse, and never curly. Colour.—Jet black; a white shirt frill never disqualify, but white feet should not be allowed in any specimen of selfcolour. ! General Appearance.—Confirmatory of all indicated above, viz., a concentration of p*are blood and type, sagacity, docility, good temper, affection and activity. Positive Points.—Head and jaw, 10; eyes, 5; ears, 5; neck, 5; body, 15; forelegs, 10; hindlegs, 10; feet, 10; stern, 10; coat and feather,-10; general appearance, 10; total positive points, 100. Negative Points. —Light eyes (undesirable, but not fatal), 10; light nose (fatal), 15; curled care (very undesirable) 15; curled coat (curly, woolly, or wiry), 30; carriage of stern (crooked or twisted), 20; top-knot (fatal), 20; total negative points, 100. SCALB OF POINTS FOR ANY OTHER VARIETY OF COCKER SPANIEL. Descriptive Particulars. —Same as in tho black variety, with the following exceptions: Coat.—Similar in every way to the coat of the black variety, except in colour and markings. Colour.—Black and tan, liver and tan, liver, black-tan-and-white, lemon ana white, roans, and in fact, nearly any combination or blending of colours. Positive Points.—Same as in the black variety. Negative Points.—(Subject to colour). Similar to those of the black variety.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTIM19090514.2.14

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Times, New Zealand Times, Volume XXXI, Issue 6818, 14 May 1909

Word Count
1,646

KENNEL NOTES New Zealand Times, Volume XXXI, Issue 6818, 14 May 1909

Working