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OBITUARY.

\Yk regret to record the death of Major W. A. Dean Pitt, second son of the late MajorGeneral Pitt, C.8., Lieutenant-Governor of the colony, who died at Ellesmere House, Princes-street, on the Sth November, at t ho comparatively early age of 56, of consumption. lie arrived here ;iuoub three weeks ago from Sydney in a delicato state of health, and from the first was unable to leave his residence. Dr. Haines was in medical attendance, and did all that medical skill could suggest, but all was in vain. It was the desire of the lamented officer to end his days in Auckland. His wish was gratified, and he died wit hin a stone's throw of the place where his father died 40 years ago. The deceased officer was born in Ireland, where his father was then quartered. After completing his education he obtained a commission in a crack corps, the GOth Rifles. Ho ultimately sold out, and came out to Australia about 1857, and subsequently received an important appointment on the Victorian Volunteer staff. After residing in Melbourno for some years he married Miss (Jellibrand, a daughter of the Hon. .T. T. (jellibrand, AttorneyGeneral of Tasmania (sister of Mrs. James Smith, of this city, and formerly of Melbourne). In 18!j4 Major Pitt came to New Zealand, and took up land in Otago, in the Blueskin district, where he resided for .17 years. After that he and Airs. Pitt travelled a good deal for the benefit of their health, visiting Auckland and then going on a trip to the mother country, from which they returned to Auckland in 1880. Major Pitt stayed in the Auckland province for a couple of years, since which date ho and Mrs. Pitt have been travelling in the Australasian colonies, for his health. As already stated, Major Pitt felt his end drawing near, and returned about three weeks ago to breathe his last in the city he had loved so well from many sacred associations. He leaves no family. His last wish was to be buried beside the remains of his father, in the family vault in the Anglican cemetery, Symonds-strect. The funeral took place on the 11th November. The funeral corleyc. left Ellesmere House, Princes-street, at four o'clock, there being nine carriages, the first containing Mrs. I'itt (widow of the deceased officer), Mrs. Jas. Smith (sister-in-law), Mrs Wilkins and Miss Coat.es ; the second, Mrs. Mclsopp and Misses Bell, Travers, and Outhwaite; the third, as chief mourners, Messrs. James Coates, D. W. Duthie, J. Menzies, and Dr. Wilkins; then followed officers of the Imperial and Colonial services, Hon. Colonel Haultain, Colonel Burton (lato 40th Regiment), Major Tisdail Major Gascoigne, Captain Thomas, Ser-geant-Major Snillington (lato Royal Engineers), Sergeant-Major Speight (formerly of Auckland Brigade Office), SergeantMajor llaslam (lato of Auckland Volunteers). Among those present were Inspector Broliam, Captain Clayton, Dr. Purclias, Rev. W. E. Mulgan (Onehunga), Messrs. E. A. Mackechnie, J. S. Macfarlane, J. Eller, G. P. Pierce, G. S. Graham, \Y. B. White, Hudson Williamson, (3. Morrow, 11. M. Shepherd, W. Heron, W. Crovvthcr, G. Manning, J. Courtayne, C. S. Andrews. The cortege was met at the entranco of the Anglican Cemetery by Bishop Cowie and the Rev. C. M. Nelson (of St. Paul's). The Rev. C. M. Nelson read the first part of the burial service, and His Lordship the latter portion in an impressive manner. Another of our vory oldest colonists haS joined the great majority in the person of Mr. Hayr, whoso death took place at his late residence at Epsom on November 8, at the ripe old age of 81 years. For nearly a half-century the deceased gentleman was associated with Epsom and the neighbourhood of the Three Kings, where his name was a household word and where his geniality of disposition made him a favourite with young and old of all classes. Mr. Hayr took a keen interest in all local matters, and was for a number of years a member of tho One-tree Hill Road Board. The funeral took place on the 9th November, and was attended by a large number of friends, the chief mourners being his only son Mr. James Hayr and his grown-up grandsons. It will be seen from our obituary columns that Mr. John Ward Taylor, youngest son of the lato General Taylor, of West Tamaki, has died in London, at the comparatively early age of 54. He came out to Auckland from London in the ship Sir Edward Paget, with his brother George, about 40 years ago, to join their father, but he subsequently returned home. Mr. George Taylor died some years ago. Intelligence was received in town on Nov. 14, by private telegram, of the death of Dr. Mclntyre, of Timaru. He will be remembered as taking a prominent part in

the Hall case/ and in fact laid the information. Some two years ago he married flit's Burns, a descendant of the poet Burns, and who was present at the unveiling of the statue to the poet at JDunedin. Dr. MoIntyre was highly esteemed in the Timaru district for his many personal qualities, and had a large practice there. The funeral on Nov. 10 was attended by an immense cortege. Nearly all the adults in tho town and a great number from the surrounding country followed or witnessed the funeral. As senior member of the medical stall of the colony he was given a military funeral by the volunteers and the band. Tho coffin was borne on a gun carriage, and was preceded by a charger with military caparisons. He was a native of Dumbartonshire, and his age was 45. The cause of death was aggravated pleurisy. The death is announced of another old pensioner, Air. Michael (Jill, of Tamahere, Waikatci, who died on Friday, the IJOth October, at the ripe age of SO years, and who was buried at Hamilton East tho following Monday, the Rev. Father O'Gara, 0.5.8., ofliciating. The deceased was well known throughout the district, and universally liked. Mr. Gill leaves a family of seven children, twenty-seven grandchildren, and live great grandchildren to mourn their loss.

Dr. Turnfcull, a well-known medical man, died at Christchurch at half-past ten o'clock on Monday morning, November 10. He arrived there in 1858, and took an active part in local politics for some years. He was a member of the Provincial Council, and served on several local bodies.

It is announced in our obituary columns that Mr. Edward Da vies, builder, expired at the residence of his son-in-law, Air. W. Hooker, Symonds-strect, at the ago of fifty-seven years. Prior to his arrival in Auckland seven ago Mr. Davies suffered from asthma and chronic rheumatism, and for several months past he has been a martyr to those complaints. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon, November 17. Deceased took an active part in Masonic matters, and had been a P.M. of of Lodge Prince of Wales, E.G., and D.G. Sword-bearer in the Provincial Grand Lodge. A large number of members of the English, Irish, and Scottish Constitutions followed his remains to their last resting place. We regret to announce tho death of Airs. Mackellar, wife of Dr. E. D. Alackellar, which took place on Nov. 17, at the early age of 42, at her residence, Parnell, after a painful illness of two months' duration, it is understood from the after effects of an attack of peritonitis. The interment was private. Mrs. Mackellar-was much esteemed for her kindly disposition and personal virtues.

Piniha Marutuahu, an old Maori chief, well known at the Thames and Te Aroha, died at the native pa, near To Aroha, on Monday, the 10th November. He was one of the earliest converted natives in the North Island, and was connected with the Wesleyan Mission visiting Australia and South Sea Islands some 50 years ago in their mission vessel. During the native rebellion he took an active part against the Europeans, being in every engagement up to that at the Gate Pa.

Jn our obituary column will be found the name of an old identity, Mr. Robert Cox head, sen., a settler on the Waimate Plains, who has just passed away at the age of (59. Deceased came to the colony in 1842 in the Jane Clifford, his future wife, Miss Muir, coming in the Duchess of Argyle, the sister ship, with the Scotch pioneer settlers. All*. Coxhead was at the Great Barrier copper mine, and in the early days of the Coromandel gold diggings at Ring's rush. Ie then settled at Papatoetoe, where on his farm at Woodside he resided, for a quarter of a century, afterwards going to Wairenga, near Llangiriri. From Waikato he went to the YVaimate Plains, after Mr. Bryce's arrest of To Whiti at Parihaka, and lived there up to his death. Deceased never took any part in public affairs, but was well known in Auckland by the old identities. He leaves a number of sons who are all settled on the Plains. His only brother lives at Otara, Otahuhu. Deceased was a native of Wiltshire.

The many friends of Mrs. Newton, wife of Mr. W. ii. Newton, headmaster of tho Tararu School, will, we feel sure (says the Thames Star), learn with sincere feelings of regret of her decease, which took place at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Newton, sen., at Ponsonby, on the 19th November, Tho deceased young lady, who was 23 years of age, and had only been married about two and a-half years, has been in failing health for the past two or three months, but until' within the last three or four weeks hopes were entertained for her recovery. About three weeks ago, however,-she proceeded to Auckland for the benefit of her health, .und was attended by three doctors, all of whom agreed that she was suffering from consumption of a most severe and rapid type. Mrs. Newton, during her short residence at the Thames, won for herself tho esteem and respect of a largo circle of acquaintances, who will regret to hear of her death. Much sympathy is expressed for Mr. Newton in his sad bereavement.

Our Tan ran;-, r a correspondent telegraphs that Mr. Robert Home, an old anil wellknown resident l , died very suddenly on November 23, at half-past seven a.m. lie was washing himsolf when ho was seized with a fit of apoplexy, and died almost immediately. Mr. Horn*! was an old and wellknown resident of Auckland, having resided there over forty yea.vs ago, and being connected with ii number of the leading Scotch families. i'r. Horno was well known as a commission anil mining agent, and some ten years ago gave up business in Auckland and settled in Tauranga. For the past two or three years he had been in very uncertain health, but) his sudden death was quite unexpected. Mr. A. 11. Phelps died at Norfolk Island on the 29th of October, after a short illness of a few days. He wis well known as as evangelist in this city, and was greatly respected by a large number of friends. Our Russell correspondent telegraphed on Nov. 28 —Mi s. Edward Irving died this morning after a very painful illness. It will be seen from our obituary column that a very old identity passed away on Nov. 28, in the person of Mrs. Coolahan, at the advanced age of 78, relict ot the la to Mr. Hugh Coolahan. Airs. Coolahan and her husband were well known in Auckland in the early days. The deceased lady was noted for her kind-hearted and benevolent disposition. Another old colonist died on Nov. 28, Mr. David Olphcrt, of Valley Road, Mount Eden, at the age of 75. He was for many years in business in the city, and took an active part in temperance and social reform work.

Sydney Taiwlianga, the well-known Maori member for the Northern electorate, died at Whakatane on Nov. 27. His remains will bo brought to Rotorua. A largo tangi will take place. The Maoris arc now lamenting the loss of their friend and patriot.

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Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVII, Issue 8427, 1 December 1890

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2,008

OBITUARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVII, Issue 8427, 1 December 1890

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