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Telegraphic communication with the SsnJ was interrupted yesterday evening, the tea being down eouth of Cheviot, in Canterbury. Later on, however, conunanication was restored.

The Hon. Major Atkinson (Premier) oil the Hon. Mr. Alitchelson (Minister of PaM» Works) will probably be in Auckland W«unesday night or Thursday morning. I* J expected that Major Atiinson will addrej tue Auckland coustitueticies.and Mr.Slitch?> aon may have something to tell the public in respect of his department. Considers^' 5 interest just now is taken in the Premier' utterances. Perhaps the experiment will ttried ox holding the meeting to hear tl! Premier on Saturday evening. Among the passengers from the Sou'-n yeaterdivy, by the s.s. Ringarooma, was.M" Robert Htout, of Dunedin, who filled the ofec* of Attorney-General in the early part oftW career o: the Grey Ministry. He accept 1 - an invitation to visit Mr. W. J. Hurst) country residence at Lake Takapuna, zz* spent the remainder o£ the day there, i!" Stout is engaged as counsel in a Corporate ca»e at Wellington that will require him_a procted thilher shortly. He is accomparieon his present visit to Auckland by M ri j Stout, who is in a delicate state of heslA i and intende paying a visit to the Hct Sprins'i Waiwera.

In addition'to the information which * ! published yesterday, supplied to us by i"Barry, we are informed that the prospectors did not find gold at Puugapunfja Crei»They did not think it wise for the natives w find gold on them, and so gave what tW had to a man named McDonald, who** , guide to the Wanganui Prospecting Company. McDonald betrayed his trust, gave tho gold to the natives. It is now 1ihe possession of Wahanui, who is no* c his way to Wellington, and Barry *-* McDonald will meet him there in refereeto tne matter.

A meeting was held yesterday of * Gospel Temperance Mission, under v ffii auspices Mr. C. O. Davis, Mr. T. B, «>'* \ and itir. Graham Tawhai have lately p»" visit to the King Country to i ll^ ,lo natives to sign a petition against drink b *' admitted to the district. Amongst preisiinc were : Revs. Messrs. Reid T • JUnnra; Messrs. Cox, Fry, French, Liri;"» and Neale. Mr. T. B. Hili was f^ • (Mr. Davis not being able to attend thiojS illness), *nd narrated what the P ir ?J d3 » done. Those present were much g^' l "' y thfl success of the mission. Votes of tn» were passed to those who had done the , I and to all who had assisted them, sucu Mr. Ormsby and the Rev. Haurati Faui. Mr. C. A. DeLautour, M.B.Rt wa3 g 3 passenger by the Ringarooma yesteraay. is on a business visit to Auckland.

The long threatened war between -Piace-J and China has now been finally averted. A treaty has.been concluded between the two countries for the settlement of the Tonqnin difficulty. China consents to a French protectorate over Tonqnin and Anuam, aud France waives her claim to a war indemnity. China has acted wisely in consenting to the French demands. By resintiog them war would have been rendered unavoidable. Jn such a conflict China would have been beaten, and would have been forced to submit to exacting terms. The loss, too, occasioned by such an unequal struggle would bava been enormous. The substantial benefits to France under the present treaty are of the most meagre kind. Her protectorate in Tonquin and Anntm is very likely to prove a white elephant to the .Republic.

A report obtained currency in Cairo that the British Government had given orders for preparations to'be made to despatch a military force to the relief of tbe garrison at Khartoum, but it has been ascertained to be incorrect. It is, however, hourly expected that such an order will be given. Should a military expedition be sent to Khartoum, Lord Wolseley will, in all probability, be placed in command of it. Great alarm prevails in Cairo in consequence of the report that Oeman Digna is marching agaiDst Dongola, and that it is his intention to penetrate into Upper Egypt.

Intelligence has been received in Constantinople of the death of Midhat Pasha. He •was born in 1822, and rose to the position of Grand Vizier. He was a pronounced reformer —enlightened, liberal-minded, and energetic. His enemies (and he had m»ny) ultimately triumphed over him. He was disgraced, finally charged with complicity in the death of Abdul Aziz, and condemned to death. The exertions of the British Government, however, saved him from that fate. He was exiled. Some time ago it was reported that he had escaped.

With reference to our remarks on the annual municipal accounts, it appears that what we termed allocation of fnnds showing apparent receipts from wards is in reality the allocation of the first portion of the new loan of £100,000, just raised, for each of the wards, and shotting the expenditure out of such allocation to March 31st last.

On the passage up from Dunedin of the •jchooner Camille, the boatswain of that vessel committed suicide by jumpiDg overboard. The man (William Bolger), it appears, had been drinking heavily at the port of wepartnre just prior to the vessel's sailing, but nothing occurred to create suspicion until the sth instant, when the man became very excited, and showed all the symptoms of suffering from delirium tremens. Captain Helgeson took every precaution to protect the man from harming himself, and as he continued to get more violent, he was placed in irons for safety. Hβ was repeatedly calliDg out that' some Maoris were wanting to kill him, and he was constantly a»king the captain to shoot him. Later in the day he managed to get a small looking-glass that was in the cabin, and, breaking it to pieces, cat himself with them in a frightful manner —his face and arms being dreadfully hacked about. A man waa then placed to watch him, to see that he did no further harm to himself. The next night, at about midnight, the unfortunate man asked the watchman to obtain for him a drink of water, and whilst the latter was absent, Bolger rushed, out from his cabin, and sprang overboard. The slarm was given, and a boat .speedily lowered, but, although he could be seen struggling in the water, he could not be reached before he sank. The captain reported the matter to the authorities yesterday.

To-day Mr. G. B. Federli leaves Auckland for the South. On his way to Chriatchurch he will call at New Plymouth, and address one or more meetings there upon the propriety of taking steps to establish those subtropical industries which the soil and climate ■will produce. From New Plymouth he will go to Wanganui, where meetings will be held and instructions given; thence'he will I goto Wellington, and then to his home in Christchuroh. It would be desirable that something should be done to give the in- ! formation imparted, and the interest excited in these industries, a practical turn. If Mr. Federli cannot be spired Christchurch, some one should bs engaged in Auckland to Eee that the interest in these subjects is not allowed to flag, bat that best kinds of trees, &c, he secured, and their cultivation and distribution engaged in without delay. To make sericulture a domestic industry in this province, the best varieties oi the silkproducing mulberry should be found in sufficient nnmbers on every farm, and anound every homestead, to secure abundance of food to the insects during their short existence. When that is done, and practical knowledge acquired of the beat methods of pruning the trees for the production of leaves, and a ready market provided in Auckland for both silkworm eggs and dried cocoons, there is no doubt a great deal of money would soon find its way into the homes of the country settlers, without interfering with the' ordinary farm operations.

We have received from the publishers the first number of the New Zealand Craftsman and Masonic Review, which has just been issued at Wellington from the printing office of Messrs. Lyon and Blair, Lambton Quay, for "the New Zealand Craftsman" Publishing Company. The number to hand is the first issue of a monthly magazine of Masonic intelligence and literature. It consists of S2 pages of well printed matter. The introductory article refers to the object of the publication, and the lines on which it is to be carried out. A succeeding article refers to the general encouragement the venture has received, while acknowledging the receipt of letters from the D. Grand Lodges of Wellington and Otago and Southland, declining to sanction it, on the ground that there was mother Masonic journal, the New Zealand Freemason, in existence. Theremainderof the volume consists of a number of selected and contributed articles of Masonic interest; also a considerable amount of correspondence and answers to correspondents, &.C. The publication is well got up, and will, we believe, prove a very useful addition to Maeonic literature, especially applicable to this colony.

Yesterday afternoon quite a crowd assambled in Wyndham-street, opposite the National Bank", being attracted hither by the ineffectual efforts of a team of two horses to take a wagjjon load of potatoes of two and a-half tons up Wyndham-ntreet, the load With the waggon being nearly three and ahalf tons. Several complaints had previously been made.to Mr. G. N. Brassey, Secretary of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, as regards similar practices previously, and he determined yesterday to make an example, and institute proceedings against the offender. Mr. Brassey called the attention of the constable on the b«at, Constable Bern, to the affair, and that officer counted thirty sacks of potatoes on the waggon, and made a report on the circumstances of the Case.

John Jamc3. White O'Connor, who v/as arrested at Waitara and brought up to Auckland on remand from New Plymouth on a charge of issuing a forged chequp for £14 los, was brought up at the Police Court yesterday, and after the evidence of Constable Day, of Waitara, had been taken, the further hearing of the oase was remanded for eight days.

Norman McKenzie, a middle-aged man of respectable appearance, was charged yesterday at the Police Court with being drunk and with committing an indecent assault on a little girl. The latter case was remanded until to-day.

Two notorious characters—Richard Carkeek Coulson, or I>r. Coulson, and Wm. Henry Croseley, a notorious thief—were brought up at the Polico Court yesterday under the Prisons Act—the fir3t for using offensive language towards one of the warders, and the second for refusing to work. The doctor was very indignant, and aaid the warder was not fit to address a gentleman, and displayed a good deal of temper when in the dock. Mr. Resdeu, Governor' of the Gaol, did not wish the man severely punished by solitary confinement and low diet, and on his recommendation seiven days' marks, or forty-two marks in all, were deducted from his good conduct list. Grossley was let off. without punishment on hie promise to behave better in future, but cautioned that if he was brought up again ne would roceive a double dose. On Saturday evening next, Mr. F. W. renncfather, L.L.M., Private Secretary to His Excellency the Governor, will deliver a lecture at the Parnell Hall, entitled " My gamble Through Algeria." Mr. Pennejather delivered this lecture in Wellington la«t year, and it was highly spoken of there, air MauriGe O'Rorke, Speaker of the House os Representatives, is to preside. The proiu i. be B ' Ven t0 St " Mary ' s Or phanage

As an item of theatrical news it may be stated that it is the intention of Mr. George Darrell, the .well-known Australian actor and dramatist, to make a tour of New Zealand with a specially organised company. Among the pieces that will be performed are "Sunny South," " Transported for..Life, " Back from the Grave," otc. Theae plays have been performed with success in Australia. Mr. Dodge, who has been connected jwith the " youth" and "Lights o' London" Company as business manager, has been making arrangements for tho tour, and will accompany Mr. Darrell's company as acting manager. ■

• Webave to acknowledge for Messrs. H. H. Hayr: and Co., Hich-street, the receipt of a sample of honev from the apiary of Captain E. D. H. Daly, H autapu, - Waikato. The honey is pure, of good quality, and is put up in bottles. At the late show in the Prill-shed, Captain Daly competed in the Tioney section, and obtained first prize. Messrs. Hayr and Co. , act as town agents for the disposal of the produce of Captain Daly's apiary. »

In the British Trade Journal of the Ist March is an article upon the establishment of subtropical industries in Auckland. _ It makes reference to what Mr. Federli is doing, and also to what Mr. Soler, of "Wanganui, has done in the matter of cultivating the vine there,' and the preparation of wino from the grapes. Our contemporary writes in a very hopeful strain of the culture of the vine, olives, mulberry, tea, etc., in the northern part of the Auckland province.

" Lights o , London" was repeated at the Opera House last night to a good downstairs house, and a fair attendance in the drees circle. "ihere were some chanc.es in the caste, Miss Flora Acetead and Mr. Catboart being absentees, but Mrs. Wooldridge took her old part of Mre. Jarvis, instead of Miss Anste.id, and gave a, very complete and perfect rendering of the partt She is more matronly and less shrewish than Miss Anstead, and tho change in no way interfered with the success of the piece. The last three productions of this remarkably successful production are now announced. On this evening, Wednesday, and Thursday, this performance will bo repeated in Au'ckland, and on Friday Sheridan's comedy "The Rivals" will be placed on the stage.

' The Eev. S. Macfarlane delivered a lecture on " A Century of English History from an Ecclesiastical Standpoint," at the United Methodist Sunday-school last evening. The lecture was given in connection with the Literary and Debating Class, of which the Rev. Mr. Macfarlane 13 President. Mr. Platfc was Chairman. The lecture occupied an hour and a half in delivery, and was an able discourse. At its conclusion tho Chairman and Mr. F. G. Ewington having briefly addressed the meeting, a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the R"ev. Mr. Macfarlane.

The new organist of St. Matthew's, Mr. Neville Barnett, arrived yesterday from Christchurch. Ho commences his duties on Sunday next, but it is understood that he will meet the choir at the residence of the incumbent, the Rev. W. Tebbs, on Thursday, the 15th instant.

The residents in the Remuera • district ave now anxiously looking for a break in the weather and some rain. At present cattle and other stock have in some cases to be driven some distance for water.

The instructor in drill and gymnastics in the Auckland .public schools, Mr. Owen Mahon, makea the following remarks in his annual report:—" During the past year there has been a greater interest than formerly taken in drill and gymnastics, both by pupils and teachers, and the result on the whole is rery satisfactory. The . teachers at the Saturday classes hare shown a large amount of interest in drill during the past year, and have evinced a great desire to beaome efficient. During the year I have attended thirty schools, fifteen of the same every week, and exercising thereat about 5000 pupils. The remaining fifteen, being country schools, have been visited once every five weeks, and at these I have exercised about 1500 pupils, the exercises taught by me on my visits beinn carried bat during the intervals by the teachers. Owing to the regular attendance of teachers at the Saturday classes, and the knowledge they have acquired during the year, I am now able to get through more work during my visits to the schools than previously, as . the . teachers render me all the assistance in their power. The Saturday classes for. teachers inoluded 40 males, 67 lady teachers, and 99 pupil teachers, in addition to 30 students belonging to the Training College, making in all a tptal of 236. receiving instruction in drill and calisthenics" every Saturday morning,"

Yesterday forenoon was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Robert Lundon, C.E., of the firm of Boylan and Lundon, civil engineers, to Miss Mary Ansenne, only daughter of the late Mr. James Ansenne, of the firm of Schapp and Ansenne. The groomsmen were Messrs. Boylan, C.E., Beveridge, C.K., and Buckle; the bridesmaids Misses Lundon, Brassey, and Conolly. The marriage ceremony waa celebrated by the Rev. Father Walter McDonald, Administrator, aseieted by the Rev. Father Costello, of Pukekohe. The nuptial service was performed by , the choir, under Miss Kirby; there being a crowded congregation aesembled to take part in the celebration. The wedding breakfast took place at the residence of the bride's mother, Symonds-street, where over forty gnests partook of a repaet served np by Canning in hia best style, '

Mr. Gudgeon has completed bis second volume, which is now ready for publication, giving an account of the doings of the Maoris from the year IS2O to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. In it he describes the aborigines of New Zealand and the noted toas, or great fighting men; their migrations, traditions, and superstitions ; their belief in the tapn and makutu; the raids of the Ngapuhi, Waikato, and Ngatiawa attack on Pukerangiora, the defence of Te Namo, the destruction of Ngatiwhare, the firfht at Moturoa, down to the last of the old tribal Rights, aod finishes by a short biography of the former inhabitants of the Auckland peninsula and of the great chief, Te Waharoa. The greater part of this interesting work has been gathered from the old Maori chiefs still living, and will be another scrap added to the history of these warlike people, much wanted to complete the slight knowledge we have of their early doings.

This evening Mr. Oscar Balfe and his wife (Mias Gertrude Balfe) give the first of their drawing-room entertainment* in the Devonport Hall. The piece is entitled " Odds and Ends, or Fun and Fancy." Mr. Balfe has had considerable experience in his profession, though he has not appeared in Auckland befpre. Daring next month he exnects Mies Rosa Towers to join his party in Auckland. This lady is well known, and .will he a host in herself when she arrives. Mr. Balfe has been well spoken of by the Tasm&nian and Australian papers.

j Parents of children who may be desired to attend the coming term of 'the Grammarschool, should pay attention to the noiico -published elsewhere, that the entrance examination begins on Thursday morning at ten o'clock. Boys not in attendance will be excluded from school during the coming term, as the space available is very limited. The new term begins on Monday first.

Mr. W. L. Rees was a passenger yesterday by tho Kingarooma from Gisborne. Hβ will be a candidato for the East Coast district against all comers. By present appearances, therefore, it would ■ seem that we shall have a contest between him and Sir Julias "Vogel. Politics are becoming interesting. .

Staff-Captain Wright, of the Salvation Army, and Mian Annie Brame, second daughter of Mr. John Brame, printer, were married yesterday at tho residence of the bride's father, by the Rev. W. Potter. The couple leave by the Hawea to-day for the South. They, however, return in a fortnight.

Y esterday afternoon Constable Ward arrested George Wilton, alias Thompson, alias George Thomas Ellers—a warrant having been received from Wanganui charging him with unlawfully assaulting and b?ating Joseph Soaler, a vineyard proprietor in that district. Wilton is said to have quite'a : history. He is described in the Police Gazette as " a remittance man," who seeme to have deserted his wife at one time, and has fallen into money from Kngland, He is stated to have been formerly a school teacher in the Wairarapa district. Wilton will be forwarded to Wanganui by the Hawca,

An impression seems to prevail that the proprietor of the Aurora Hotel is only carrying on the bur trade ifiiring-' the pulling down of the wooden neistion .<( tii« hotel. This is a mistake, as there are brick premises ;<t the rear containing twenty bed-a tor the accommodation of lodgers or the travelling public.

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New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 7016, 13 May 1884

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