Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Port of Auckland.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVALS. June 2-Zillab, schooner, 67 tons. Hunt, from Melbourne, in ballast. —Salmon & Co., s * . . June 2—James, 19 tone, Dent, Lom a d Kawau, with 13 tons potatoes, 20 bushels m-.ze, 1 package butter, 2 pigs, and 7 passengers. June 2-Br then, 22 tons, Bald wh, Rom Coromandel, with 11,000 feet sawn timber, and 2 passengers. June 2-.\Vorga Wonga. s. s., 73 tons, J. Bowden J from RusseW, via Kawan with 22 (7 t u r,s) sperm oil, 1 tun black oil, 22 casksl black ml. 12 head cattle, end 58 passengers.— Combes and I) y, Junfd-Don, 17 tons. Mustart, from Waiheki, with 23 tons firewood. , . T ... June 4—Nymph, 19 tons, Stewart, from Ngururu, wit.i 200 bushels ma'Ze. June 4—Waterwitch, 10 tons, Jones, from Uangaroa, with 1100 feet timber, 50lbs. honey, 1 ton onions, 10,000 shingles, and 3 passengers. . . June 4—Exert, 41 tons. Lmrio, from Mabursngi, with 50 tons firewood, 10.000 latbs, and 4 passengers. June 4—John Scott, brig, 157 tons, Jacobs, .from Melbourne. Passengers—Mr. Gordon Hayes, Mr. end Miss John Boyce, Chas. aid Thomas Boyce, Mr. & Mrs. Lawler and 3 children, Sarah Howes, Jesse Jacob, J. Judd, W. Meir, Mr. and Mrs. L’-dston and daughter, T. Robertson, D. Benton, Mr. and Mrs. Tifield and 3 children, J. Holloway, Mr. & Mrs. K. Shadwick and 2 children, Mr, and Mrs. Eiffe, James Gibson, E. Rhodes, J. Thorlane, W. Bellingham.— E. Rich, agent. June 4—Rock City, 597 tons, T. Cubbies, from London. Passengers—Mr.and Mrs. Davies, Ja res 1. Davies, James Thorn, Miss Mary Eleanor Norris, E. w. Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. G. Patterson, Mr, and Mrs. Henry Tooth, Charles Trick, Caleb Hosking, Mr. & Mrs. Chas. Ilorking. T. Pearse, Amos Vickery, H. Noble.-—Brown & Campbell, agents. June 4—Sporting Lass, brig, 120 tons, Cellum. .rota Sydney. Passengers—Mr. & Mrs. Matson, Messrs. Kennedy, Upland, Captain'l utty. June s—Maria Jane, 23 tons. Patcne, from Tauranga, with 200 bushels wheat, 30 kits maize, 130 kits potatoes, 1 pig, 1 passenger. June s—Mary, 22 tons, Unthank, from Waibeki, with 20 tons firewood, 6000 feet timber, 80 bundles palings. DEPARTURES. June 2—Triton, 19 tons, Poibipi, for Opotiki, with fund r ; p-. . June 2—Osprey, 47 tons, Lewington, for Russell, with (J chests tea, 2 tons salt, 1 chest drawers, 4 boxes soap, 1 iron plough, and 3 passengers. June 2—Brothers, 22 tons, Baldwin, for Coromandel. June 2—Resolution, 22 tons, DaTbierry, fot Coromandel, with sundries. June 4—Susan, 1G tons, Shadrack, for Opotiki. June 4 Hori Tepee, 17 tons, Hiraiona, for lauranga, with 10 boxes drapeiy, 7 mills, 13 bags sugar, 7 do. biscuit, 1 horse, and machinery for a mill. June 4 Lord Montgomery, brig, 141 tons, for Nelson, via lauranga. —C. Davis, agent. June 4—lsabella, 17 tons, Terefimana, for Tauranga, with sundries. June s—Elizabeth, 33 tons. Dixon, for Bay of Plenty, with 1 b legunny bags, 1 case port wine.

Jvi ports—Foreign

Per John Scott, from Melbourne:—s7 tins paint Oil, 306 .camp ovens, 263 pots, 48 tashe , 22 nests tubs, 6 bales blankets, .50 boxes pipes, 100 boxes raisins, 22 baskets almonds, 1 box jewellery. Per Rock City, from London . —lease, E. Rich; 1 case, J. W. Bain ; 1 package, 3 cases, J. L, Mackay ; I case, John Gibson ; 4 cases, James Walker ; I case, T. H. Cowell; 2 boxes, A. Clarke; 10 crates, G. Graham ; 14 packages, Bain & Bunt; 4 bids. Connell k Ridings; 3-i-casks, W. Brodie; 1 box, Major Matson ; 1 pipe, 1 butt, 1 hbd. 1C cases, 1 J-cask, 2 cases, The President of the Mess Committee 65th Regiment; 160 casks, J. A. Gilfillan k Co.; 1 package, G. Codlin; 1 cask, Rev. V. Lush ; 20 package , E. H. C. Russell; 10 hbds., order; 5 casks, 4 packages, D. Grabatn & Co.; 1 case. Rev. C. Abraham , 1 package, A. B. Griffiths, care of Brown and Campbell; 22 packages, Henry Smythies; 3 barrels, A. Clarke ; 1 case, J:is. Mackav; (i cases, Mr. Graham; 20 bbds. S. Fleming; fcase, John Cartright; 50 cans, 40 kegs, Oder; 3 boxes, Mi. Haultcin; 1 box, Mi s Fisher, care of Brown and Cimpbtll ; 1 box, Walter M Caul ; II kegs, I cask, Mr. Read; 4 packages, H. Thomson ; 6 packages, W. Harsant ; 1 case, W. S. Graharne ; 4 J-casks, 22 cases, Bain 4c Burtt; 2 cases, J. H. Fletcher ; 150 casks, 8 packages, Brown & Campbell; 3 cases, A. Abraham ; 1 bale, A. Clarke ; 1 package. Rev. J. C. Pattison, care of Ven. Arch. Abraham ; 1 cask, G. Graham ; 12 crates, 1 case, A. k. R. Keesing ; 5 packages, 1 box, 5 cases, 1 bale, order ; 1 case. Rev. F. Thatcher; 3 cases, C. Petschler , 42 packages, order ; 1 cask, 1 case, H. Hill; 5 cases, Rev. Gideon Srnales ; 4 boxes, 3 trunks, George Keith 5 1 case, David|Burn ; 2 casks, D. Simpson ; 6 boxes, 6 trunks, A. Clark ; 1 box, Mr. Matthews: 1 bale, T. H. Cowell; 1 box, G. Beddlington; 83 packages, order; 2 cases, 2 wheels, J. Newman; 23 casks, Gilfillan, fc»t<venson, & Co. ; 4 cases, 1 cask, C. Stichbury; 4 cases, 3 casks, R. B. Sbalders ; 1 box, Walter Brodie; 2 packages, W. S. Grabame ; 6 bales, 1 trunk, 1 case, 6 bundles, T. C. Williams ; 14 packages, 2 cases, 4 packages, I case, 2 boxes, 3 packages, J. 6c R. Kemp ; 1 case, W. S. Grabame; Cl packages. J. 8c 11. Kemp ; 155 packages, W. Coleman ; 18 packages, Bain and Burtt ; 2 casks, 8 bags, Samuel Fleming ; 4 bbds. 4 cases, T. S. Forsaitb; 11 packages T. W. Fletcher; 3 cases, E. Porter; 1 cart, 1 carriage, T. Cheeseman ; 5 packages, D. Graham Sc Co. ; 8 hbds, beer, Henry Tooth; 2 ca*es, F. Whitaker; 5 cases, Gilfillan, Stevenson, and Co.; 10 casks, T. Henry; 2 casks, 268 bars iron, 33 bundles iron, 2 bars steel, 27 sock plates, 24 brushes, John Watson ; 1 box, Captain C. Cbesney ; 3 boxes, W. Brodie; 2 cases, E. Porter; 1 case, W. S. Grabame; 1 case, Rev. Mr. Kissling; 38 packages, J. Rout; 22 packages. Bain k Burtt, 2 cases, 13 kegs, 1 package, 10 bundles spades, 5 casks, J. Rout; 1 box, Mr. Bedlington; 12 cases. Major Greenwood ; 1 case, William Boult; 93 cases, 3 casks, Bain at d Burtt; 107 packages, C. B. W'alford ; 1 box, C. &H. Black i 1 case, Rev. J. Hobbs; 188 bars iron, 58 bundles do., Gilfillan, Stevenson, & Co. ; 2 cases, Bain k Burtt; 220 bars iron, 42 packages, Gibson 8c Mitchell; 4 trunks, 23 cases, 4 bales, 15 casks, 4 cases, 6 bbds. St cases, C. Davis; 3 esses, Connell 8c Ridings ; 6 casks, 1 case, order; 1 case Bain &t Burtt; 150 packages, D. Nathan ; 80 tons coals, 300 bags salt, 100 do. do. Brown 8c Campbell; 36 packages G. Graham; 10 bales, 1 truss, 1 bale, 2 casks, 19 dozen spades, IV. Brodie; 1 case, C. Knight; 75 casks, Brown fic Campbell; 1 case, Gilfillan, Stevenson & Co ; 2 packages, C. H. Reid ; 2 bbds., 2 cases, order ; 3 cases, T. C. Law ; 23 cases, 4 casks, C. Rich; C cases. Brown 8c Campbell 3 cases. G. Graham ; 2 casks, 4 cases. C. Stitchbury : 1 box Mr. Tozard; 1 package papers, Gilfillan, Steven; sou & Co.; 31 barrels, 52 kegs Bain & Bum; 1 newcargoboit, Brown & Campbell. Per Sporting Lass from Sydney: —1 crate earthenware, Gilfillan ; 8 hhds. do., Boylau ; 2 cases, Hunt; 2 bales leather, J. Buchanan ; 3 bales, 15 ca-es, Nathan, 2 cases harness, 3 bales bags, 21 cases picklrs, 57 bundles leather, SO sashes, 160 tons N.S.W. coals, F'lelcher.

Th« schooner Zillah, Captain Hunt, arrived in harbour on Saturday morning, after a fair passage of fourteen days from Melbourne. This vessel, which was so generally admired when she was fitted out in Auckland, two or three years since by Captain Wing, and which has since been employed in the Melbourne and Tasmanian trade, has now been purchased by Captain Salmon for our own coasting trade. She appears to be in excellent order, and as she was originally a sound substantial vessel, and built with great care,we may expect her to prove a favourite on her new line. The brig John Scott, Captain Jacob, having made good her defects, at Russell, arrived in harbour on Saturday. The clipper ship Rock City, Captain Cubbins, which was off the port all Saturday night, came in on Sunday, after the as yet unequalled passage of 88 days from the Downs to Auckland. Rapid as the passage of the Rock City has been, it might have been much more so but for the calms and light and baffling winds which detained her on our own and tbs coasts of Brazil during a space of twenty days. On the 6th March, the Rock City took her departure from Deal, and in Iwo-and-twenty days she crossed the Equator. She sighted and was becalmed for five days off Cape San Augustine on the coast of Brazil; and, on the 19lh of April, passed in sight of the high land of Gough’s Island. Captain Cubbins made his passage upon the great circle principle ; the ship was cons - quently earriedinto a high southerly latitude, from J ) to 52 degrees, where she fell in with a good deal of floating ice and icebergs. On the 22nd of May the Rock City discovered the high laud of the Middle Island of New Zealand, having been farced to the Eastward by Northerly and North Easterly winds. Off the Middle Island she was becalmed (br three da vs, experiencing subsequently light variable weather during her passage along the West coast. She sighted Cape Maria Van Diemen on Ilia Ist instant , and on the following night at 11 o'clock, a course was steered to fetch the Shearer Buoy, but Captain Cubbins reports

tliat the buov was gne Thj Roek I v ' v Messrs. Eihv-.nl Lawrence &Co o f r“ I She is a remarkab’y fine ship, now’on hj« I voyage, her first voyage having been to Bomb?** 4 Ceylon, from whence she sailed to LonrW rf** Dubs of Portland, beating that favourite 1 five-and-twenty days She was built at Q ue g hj j (we are told) by the sate accnm^-I artificer that constructed the far-famed * which the Rock Ci.y seems to be no ’ ,# f I lower. She is of 598 tons old or 755 . ■I measurement. Her length is 194 feet overall ?* 8t * I of beam 31 feet, depth of hold 19 feet. u er * I is very fine, and her quarters terminate in a 1 D s ra ®er | nicely rounded stern. She is by no means taunt- 1 1 spars, but her yards are exceedingly square*!.* gethcr, for evident sailing qualities, she issued t as has rarely been seen in our Auckland water *?“? ' to be hoped she will not be the last of “** I that owners and shippers will calculate the d’ff 8 ’ *** I of profit between a passage of 83 days and one I or 130 days. It is somewhat singular that the!’ ' pool shipowners, who have long been the 1 lTa ‘ ■ successful carriers in the Australian and Tu S trades, sliould never have given their consider.?- 10 ' 211 .■ the Auckland and other New Zealand trade The brig Sporting Lass, Captain .. • harbour on Monday, alter a passage of 17 *“^o- - The Sporting Lass has been ’ the Sydney and Auckland trade, and is I here. She is a roomy brig, and her I cabin passengers are extremely good. Wlls bt i The Auckland berque Sabrina,(belonging •„ », I B?in & Burtt) hence the 28th October, Wived,.? 1, mouth on the 28th February, after a fair p&Maje sn - days. Having landed her prssengers proceeded on to London, From the papers last *"* under date, Plymouth 28th Feb. we traagc^■^»•^ , L! , lows : **• “ The barque Sabrina, from Auckland New 2n\ Captain Alexander McLean, came in today 20,000 sovereigns, from the Auckland branch Union Bank of Australia and 5001, on privatesceo^ 1 a cargo of kauri spars and gam, wool, and New’ Zea and curiosities for the Paris ExhtoT I The spars include several 80 and 8l feet , I inches square—and containing from 6to Ifl ! I timber; part of the wool is pure Saxon Flour at Auckland, 331. per ton." “Wan | We regret to learn that the Southern Crogi, fijg jp sionary schooner built for the Bishop of New ZeaiaadU ! been compelled to return to Southampton, leaky. W ■ ignorant of the extent of the injury f leaks ere by no means uncommon even in the *: | newly built vessels, and that from the most tf f causes, such as the missing of the driving cf a tnea" [ From the rdveriising columns of the Times, welem I that there were on the berth for Auckland,—thggZ 5 I line Agnes, 800 tons, Ferguson, to sail o Q fcsjM | March;" the Egmont, 1000 tons, Gibson, on them I Miy; the Joseph Fletcher, 1000 tons, E nter og 4 ■ 10'h June; the Sir Allan McNab, 840 tins, I Ist March, and Maori, 1000 tons, Peiherbtidgt Jat { Apri', were also on the berth for Wellington and tin I Southern ports. u * ft

At Sydney, there were two vessels on the berth b this port at the date of the departure of the Sport® Lass namely the brig Yarrow, Captain Kemp; andZ schooner Erin, advertis 1 to sail on the 2llh uito.

A SUEZ SHIP CANAL

The Glasgow Commonwealth gives some ii.l te information respecting the old project of ashing a uro-s Suez:—

•‘Captain Alien, a well known topoarapher, Laipj. posed abandoning the canal across the Isthmus of and joining the seas by the formation of a va*tialt*«s lake in the valley of tie Jordan. The Jordan m» fit, tie north to the south of Palestine, and flows into tia Dead Sea, Its course from the Dead Sea to the eyt» arm ot the Red Sea is supposed to have been ctey by the convulsion that took place at Sodom and Goaorrah. It is proposed to introduce water along dj whole line, and to join if, near the sea of Galilee, tolls Meditemne nbj a ship canal. The best spotfeda canal wo Ad be immediately north of Mount Carmel H.ra the valley of the Kishon runs up from them through iba plain of Esdraelon ; and, st the watewte, Jezreel s met by the valley of Jezteel, whicfcmi straight to the Jordan. The two valleys form an eui mode of access from the one place to the other; thus a canal might be made through which ;ha Meditcrraneau might flow of its own a cord to fib the Jordan valley. Ibe length of this canal from Haifa to Bethhis w ullbe 32 mi es running from N.W.toS.E. Tbs cutting would be anything but impracticable. “ The southern canal, from the Gulf of .4kiba, would probably be more difficult. This canal must be at Ja-t forty mils long, and, for more than twenty mik, through a cutting two hundred feet deep, flu ml appears to be sandstone, and at present is covered viii bundles of porphyry. This deep cutting would paa through the place were Moses lifted up the ten serpent. These two canals made —the one tojoia lie Dead Sea w.th the Red Sea—the sea-water would par into the two valleys, which lie lower than the Meduer neap, and fill them up. The Jordan valley raziei in width from four to nine miles, and it is shat in fcj high mountains on each side. It is a broad crevasse, the floor of which slopes the whole way. At theSa of Tiberias it is 521 feet below the Great Western Sa; and on the shores of the Dead Sea it hag reuledi dep hj of 1,312 feet below the Mediterranean. By letting in the water by means of those two catul*, tie whole valley would be inundated from a depth raryinj from one foot to 1,312; and instead of the present bane valley, with its sacred river, we should ban i magnifleent inland eea, Lake Jordan, 160 mite a length, and from four to tea miles broad. Bat btU teritory of any value would be absorbs!, andtki junction of the oceans would be accomplished. ‘“The chief practical difficulty would be a supply of labour. On the route of lb a northern canal, can easily work in the open air ; and it isnvoted.'thl the southern canal might be made for five yetrs the pea! settlement of India and Europe. Ever}’ man Mute td to more than 14 years’ imprisonment should bs set! thither: the completion of this task restoring him o liberty. No wages would thus be required; and,* couple of Turkish irregular cavalry regiment* would furnish all the guard required. “The poltical and commercial advantages of sir** work must be patent to all. The route to India lylw C.pe of Good Hope would be completely abandon J Swift sailing vessels would rea:h any port in ttmij* from Bombay in 40 days. Our trade with the Elis would be double. 4 ‘ The military advantages of such au anaeittraj must not be overlooked. “ What say our men of science, onr politician*, car merchants, our men of means and might, to so nobis o enterprise ? ”

BLYTH’S NOVEL STEAMERS ON THE DANUBE.

The “ Illustrated London News" of tltfi STh c " ember gives the following account of a new drsciip'i® of steamer for n&vigatign an extremely sb»!lo* P of the River Danube. The vessel, wi.h and fuel, only draws twelve inches and a half of The information is valuable be;e as showing a of overcoming the difficulties if the navigation of s’lalb w r pa ts . f otherwise noble mvigahle river*. Under a charter granted by the Austrian k o 'j* n |'?O the exclusive privilege of the regular Danube is conferred upon an assrclitinn est*" l under the title of the •' Imperial and Royil Steam ufce Navigation Company,” which now po®effls*®P“ that great stream and its tributaries theTleisar.dsf ’ a fleet of 88 steamers, with an aggregate of ThOOO power. These vessels, averaging 200 feet ® IW * ’ are built for speed, fitted with the utmost and with every requirement for the comfort and * of their paasengers. At certain seasons, bowevtr, traffic is interrupted, sometimes for seven! west* ■ „ bed of rock, known as the Iron Gate of tbeDafiH ’ near Orsava, a tronlier town of Little Wallachta. ’ 40 miles east of Moldova, on the borders of This rock Carrier has hitherto rendered it “ e<ess * r^ Bi land the passengers and carry them in rude over most eiicrable roads, to re-embark wherel t again becomes navigable. The company, bower* . now surmounted this inconvenience, having ju> * to its fleet a steamer that can pass th* Iron Gate t states of the river—her draught, with pisseag fuel, being only ItJJ inches 1 This vessel, wmc been cousiructed by Messrs. J. & A. Blyth, the e:m m rine engineers, of Liraehouse, London— ff ‘° B lately been particularly successful in some improve . of tliis nature for foreign service where stiillm* t is a chief desideratum—is lAO feel in length, 6 feet beam ; his excellent accommodation for P' I ‘;*'. e ore and has only nominally 40 horse power, or a ‘ ° horse power to eight ions measurement. Here* c light draught, combined with strength and s P*" ct i aa been obtained by some peculiarities iu the c° ns p ßf and arrangement of the vessel and her ma; h' aß 2* i instance, the hull is composed of four 1 six tiarsverse divisions, arranged in the tonno pound Iru 3. and, wi hj the bottom and sites o sol forming io watertight compartments. Ihe M* upies the centre of the vessel, and is suspenue " aclinicqts :o the vertical rihs, so as to difuse t e ° u over the whole surface of rhe bottom ol tae 6 Ibero are two pairs of paddle-wheels, very . .jj light, constructed with revolving fixate, atm Cl w {f*ll driven by a uisiinct pair ofermincs —the mrwsr „ mak n'B7, and the afu-r, t‘<J revolutions ! er . | j t a. 'i bis duplicate arrangement of the paddle*® je ' *

tirely new, and is intended to spread the weight as well as the force of the machinery over a larger ex tea: of the surface of the boat than usual, and to meet the difficulty of obtaining sufficient propelling surface, with ; iweWe inches immersion, without immoderate wid.li of of float. The engines, which are very light and comct. , re an adaptation of the light screw engines of these well-known constructors to paddle-wheel propulsion The Tachtalia (so the vessel is called), on her trial-trip, attained a speed of 11J miles against the curr-ent-and flora the novelties in her construction and j BDpearance, and the important improvement in the nav- 1 iiation of the Danube which she is destined to effect, ■ she is an object of much interest on that river. A still j cr**ter significance is attached to her, and to the change her example will, most probably, achieve in the system steam transit on this great riverine artery of Austria, when we contemplate the peculiar position of that empire in the present European struggle, and reflect what may be the consequences, whether to her own dissaffected dependencies, or to the allies, or to Russia, from the facilities these engineers have now placed at her disposal for pouring troops into the provinces on the Lower Danube, without the delay which previously intervened at the Iron Gate. This famous pass may be M iJ to bo the very key to the strategic position i will probably be the most important for Austria to sec ire in the approaching crisis in her fato and the fate of civil iiation in that part of the world ; for it is literally th u Gate ” between Servia and Wallachia; on either sid< the river is the focus of the Sclavonic populations it is so much her interest to conciliate or control; laii i may be said almost to command Widdin, so valuable to the Turks.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZ18550606.2.3

Bibliographic details

Port of Auckland., New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 954, 6 June 1855

Word Count
3,633

Port of Auckland. New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 954, 6 June 1855

Working