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STATE OF EDUCATION IN NELSON PROVINCE.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. [From the Provincial Government Gazette.] To Donald Sinclair, Esq., Chairman of tho Central Board of Education. Sin, — The most gratifying fcaturo in the education statistics for 1867-8 is, undoubtedly, the extension of ouv system of education to the remoter part? of the Province, and more especially to tho hitherto untouched districts of tho West Coast. From year to year I hare been able to record a gradual but slight increase in tho number of schools and scholars in what may be termed the home districts ; but it was generally felt that something more than this was required before our system could fairly lay claim to the title of Provincial. During the past year, howover, the number of scholars has been increased by about a fifth, a greater stride having been taken in this respect, than was accomplished during the five preceding years put together. Four new education districts have also been constituted, and applications have been sent in on behalf of two additional outlying districts. As several applications from tho inhabitants of thinly-peopled and remote neighborhoods are likely to come before the Board during tho ensuing year, I think it desirable that the public should know what course has hitherto been adopted in such cases. Two difficulties presented themselves at the outset. On the one hand, there would have been an obvious unfairness in debarring the inhabitants of outlying districts from all participation in the advantages of our Provincial system of education, until the population approached in density that of the more settled and older neighborhoods ; while, on the other hand, far ampler funds than were at the disposal of tho Board would be required to meet the cost of building schools and maintaining teachers wherever fifteen or twenty children of school age could bo collected within an area of three or four square miles. A middle course was decided upon. Applicants, in such cases as I have referred to, were required to provide a suitable site, and to erect a school at their own cost, the Board finding books and school furniture, besides paying the salary of the teacher. This has been done at Ngatimoti and at Molupiko, and seems, on the whole, preferable to the alternatrve of falling back on Clause 16 of the Education Act, which gives two-thirds of the householders of any Education district the power of levying special rates. The number of children on the rolls for 1867-8 is 2678, being more by 422 than attended during the previous year. The number of readers recorded us "good" is 622, as against 559, an increase, however, not more than proportionate to the increased number of scholars. In penmanship steady progress has been made, this year's returns showing 350 good writers, compared with 298 last year. But by far the greatest improvement has been made in arithmetic, the number of scholars possessing some knowledge of fractions, decimal*, &c. (237), having increased by fully one-third, Avhile an equally striking advance has'been made by the junior classes. The number of children who have learnt something of history, grammar, and geography has also been largely added to. Before proceeding to give* such a detailed account of the status of each school, as it has hitherto been my practice to lay before the Board every second year, I will briefly touch \ipon several minor matters in which it seems to me that our schools, as a whole, are capable of some improvement. I have been in the habit of examiuing a large proportion of our schools annually, at the request of the Local Committees, with a view to the distribution of prizes, though, strictly speaking, tins scarcely falls' within the sphere of my duties as Inspector. At these examinations the general practice struck me as being faulty in several respects. Ist. In the majority of our schools far too many prize 3 are usually offered — three or four prizes being often awarded to a class of six or eight scholars. To scatter prizes broadcast in this fashion must tend to weaken that spirit of emulation which. ( it is the chief object of competitive examinations to ' excite and sustain. In the town schools, where not more than two prizes are offered to a class of twenty or five-and-twenty, a keen spirit of emulation has never been wanting, — to obtain a prize under such conditions being justly regarded as an honorable distinction, and one not to be won without considerable eifort. 2nd. In very few schools is a class register kept, showing the daily order of merit of each scholar, an examiner being expected to decide as to the comparative merits of perhaps sixty children, after a necessarily hasty and superficial examination of, at the most, four or five hours duration. Under such circumstances the most impartial and practised examiner must frequently decide amiss. Seeing how much less liable to mislead a record taken perhaps twice daily, and extending over a considerable period, would bo, than the notes taken hurriedly by an examiner on a single occasion, and how powerful an incentive to continuous exertion would be given by such a record, I do not think that the plea of want of time should be held sufficient to justify any teacher in neglecting to keep a class register. Tho plan lias been adopted in several schools at my suggestion, and I trust to see it ere long in universal use. 3rd. The cultivation of the memory appears to have been very generally neglected. This is no doubt mainly due to a natural reaction against the old-fashioned, system of teaching, according to which almost exclusive attention was paid to the strengthening of the faculty of memory. But I hold that it is still an open question (whatever may be urged by the more modern school of teaching), whether spelling can be so successfully taught by dictation alone, as it can with the assistance of the spelling-book. And the practice of learning poetry by heart, now so uncommon, in addition to its beneficial effect on the memory, has the gveat advantage of storing the mind at a period when it is most impressionable, with many of the masterpieces of our language, insomuch that the stock of noble thoughts thus acquired, however dimly their full meaning may be apjjrehended at the time, may bo reckoned among the most lasting and tho most valuable possessions that a child carries away from school. First Division Town Boys, Bridge-street— -Mr. Smith.— The establishment of the two large schools in Hampden-street and on the Haven road as independent schools (that on the Haven road having been formerly merely auxiliary to tho Bridge-street school) must have affected the position of the latter, as a leading school, to a certain extent. It continues, notwithstanding, to hold a very respectable rank among our schools, a manifest improvement having taken place both in reading and writing, the latter of which especially was below the average last year. The arithmetic continues as heretofore, remarkably good, while the upper classes show a fair acquaintance with geography, grammar, and the outlines of English history. The discipline is also excellent. Second Division Toion Boys—Kv. Sadd, assisted by Mr. Shnmonds. — Drafts of carefully • prepared scholars are promoted periodically from the first class in this division to the Upper school. Little more can be said of this school than that it fulfils in every respect the purpose for which it was originally instituted, that of giving a sound preparatory training to a lai'go number of boys, the bulk of whom are under 10 years of ago. First Division Town Girls — Mrs. Sait. — With the assistance of a pupil teacher, the mistress of this division gives an excellent education to about 60 girls. The reading and writing are almost uniformly very good, while arithmetic, in which the girls failed palpably at the last yearly examination, has been so carefully attended to since, that this school now ranks only second to the boys' school, Bridge-street, in that respect. The knowledge of geography, grammar, and history is quite equal to what may fairly be expected. I have remarked, however, that this school, as is usually the case where a very energetic system of teaching prevails, is rather noisy, though hardly so much so as to interrupt the class work. Second Division, Town Girls— Miss Galland. — I I have every reason to be satisfied with the orderly and efficient way in winch the children who attend this | school, (ho larger proportion of whom are under nine ' years of age, are being prepared for tho Upper Girls' ! School. No attempt is made to impart anything bu

tlio rudiments of reading, -writing, and arithmetic 5 nor ought more to bo oxpectcd from a preparatory school, whoro largo numbers of vory young children aro under tho caro of a single teacher. Town Preparatory— -Mrs. Cook, assisted by Miss Cother.— This school is -well-conducted, and numerously attended, and continues to furnish halfyearly drafts to tho Second Division of the Town Girls and Boys Schools. Sonio months ago, when tho pressure of numbers threatened to injuro the school, I recommended tho adoption of the half-time system, as being peculiarly suitable to a school where vory few of tho children had attained their seventh year. Tho plan was fairly tried with the sanction of tho Local Committoo, but though it answered well with tho children who came in tho morning, as more timo could bo spared for individual teaching, owing to tho diminution of numbers, it was found that very few children could be induced to attend in tho afternoon, aud that tho system was riowed with disfavor by tho paronts. It wa9, therofore, ultimately abandoned. Haven-road— Mr. J. L. Hodgson, assisted by Miss Domont.— Sinco the beginning of 1868, whon this was made an indopondent, instead of an auxiliary school, a marked improvement has taken place ; more especially in tho upper classes, the beginnors being now under tho chargo of an assistant. When tho youth of tho scholars is taken into consideration (only 17 scholars out of tho 140 who have attended school during tho past year, having reached their twelfth year) , ' tho numbor of readors rocorded as "good" 37, is comparatively vory considerable, while tho proportion of good writers is also unusually large, when the age of tho scholars, a most important item in any comparative ostimato, is had regard to. A class register, such as I have recommended abovo, has been in uso horo from tho opening of the school, with tho best results. It may not bo out of placo to remark, that owing to tho roof of tho school having a vaulted wooden ceiling, tho vorboration of sound is so great as to rondor it almost impossiblo to hear what is being said by the teachers, though the scholars aro by no means disordorly. Tho same fault in construction has, unfortunately boon repeatod in tho new school at Hampdeustreet, with precisely similar results. Hampden-street — Mr. M'lntosh, assistant Mr. Barnott. — This school, which was only opened at the beginning of tho present year, has attained such a moasuro of popularity that it now shows a larger daily attondanco (105) than any other school in the Province. As tho building was not intondod to accommodate moro than eighty children, tho teachors labor under great disadvantages, tho school being necessarily overcrowded, and excessively noisy. This does not porcoptibly affect tho moro silent lessons, such as writing and arithmetic, both of which aro most Buccossfully taught, but tho unavoidable clamor and confusion toll seriously against tho reading, besides interfering with the teachers' explanations. The largo addition to tho building which is to bo proceeded with forthwith, will doubtless enable the teachers to raiso this to tho rank of a first-class school in another year. St. Mary's Hoys — Mr. Richards. — This, though porhaps tho longost-ostablished school in tho Provinco, has only boon placed under tho operation of tho .Education Act during the last nine months. As thia is the first instance of a ho&j of ratepayers availing thomsolves of tho amendment in tho Act, which camo into oporation last year, tho cxporimont lias boon watched with somo interest. Hitherto it may bo said to have been attended with comploto success; for tho bonoflcial results have bcou of a twofold oharaoter. The teacher, whoso remuneration has boon mado contingent upon tho number of scholars in daily attendance, has boon a gainer by the marked increase that has takon place in his school undor tho present system, while the friends of national education can point with pleasure to tho largo number of children tiow regularly attending St. Mary's Schools, who formerly received no schooling whatovor. Tins sudden accession of new scholars has, howovor, necessitated tho ontire re-modelling of tho school, which at present suffers somewhat from tho disadvantages that must always attend a largo influx of ill-taught scholars, — not tho least of which is tho almost impossibility of properly classifying the new comors. (A similar difficulty was felt on the oponing of our Provincial schools.) In spite of theso drawbacks, rospectablo results havo been produced already, tho arithmetic being generally good, while at tho last examination tho moro advanced boys gave a vory intelligent explanation of tho subject mattor of tho day's lesson, and showed a more lhan average acquaintance with tho outlines of geography. St. Mary's Girls— Miss Smith. — As this school had not been open more than six weeks whon I last examined it, Bcarcoly sufficient timo had elapsed to onablo mo to give a docided opinion as to its merits A large proportion of tho girls had evidently received vory littlo provious schooling, and it appeared to me that much preliminary training would bo required bofore the school could attain to tho standard of tho othor town schools. The teachor, though inexperienced, struck mo as being painstaking and intelligont. Hillside — Mr. Danvors. — Tho education statistics for the past yoar show, as usual, an exceptionally high standard of attainment in this school, but it would bo unfair to conceal tho fact that tho attondanco has fallen off lately to a considerable extent, and that tho majority of tho advanced scholars have loft tho Bchool. At my last examination, only 14 children, most of whom woro very young, wero prcsont (littlo moro than half tho number prosonl on a similar occasion in June, 1867.) It would bo foroign to tho objects of a report of this kind to enter into the local causes that havo brought about this doplorablo rosult, moro especially whon no falling off in tho neighboring population, and no want of capacity on tho part of the teacher, can be alleged in explanation. I can only record, with rogret, the ohango for tho worso in what I have for many years looked upon as ono of tho most promising of our schools. Clifton Terrace— Mr. Gilbert.— This school, which for a long timo remained stationary, if ifc did not actually lose ground, has boon steadily improving of Into, both in tho numbor of scholars, and in tho regularity of their attendance, which, during tho March quartor, was as high as 78 por cent. A corresponding adranco has boon mado in lonrning, the reading and writing being of moro than avonigo merit. In arithmetic, however, a gcnoral backwardness is still noticonblo. Tho childron arc remarkably orderly. Stoke — Mr. and Mrs. Smith. — This year's returns show a considorablo falling off in tho number of good readers, for which I am unablo to account satisfactorily, as tho numbors and ages of tho scholars correspond prottv accurately with thoso givon last year, and tho dady average attondanco for tho last three quarters of this year, 74 por cent, is considerably highor than that of tho majority of our schools. In othor respects, tho prcsont returns contrast not unfavorably with thoso of last year, and aro sufficient to show that Stoko holds a fair position among our country schools. Richmond Soys— Mr. Harrington^— Tho present master has been only recently appointed to Richmond, but ho has already effected a porcoptiblo improvomont in tho tono and discipline of his school. Tho numbor of scholars also appoars to bo on tho increase, though a daily attondanco of 39 still falls short of what might bo expected in a comparatively populous neighborhood. As on former ocensions, 1 found tho arithmetic and grammar of tho first class exceptionally good, but tho rending was indifforent tliroughout, and tho writing, with a fow exceptions, slovenly. Richmond Girls— Miss Sponcer, (assisted by two pupil teachers.) In point of numbers and regularity of attendance, this school leaves nothing to be desired. Tho proportion of good readers and writers is remarkably largo, and in arithmetic, as in tho Town Girls' School, a notable advanco has been mado during tho past twolvo months, 37 scholars having successfully passed an examination in proportion and practico, and 21 in fractions, whereas last year I could record only 8 girls as knowing anything of practice and none as having any acquaintance with fractions. A keen spirit of emulation prevails throughout tho school ; tno gradation of classes is carefully attended to, and tho prevailing ordor and neatness are worthy of special commendation. Appleby—Nr. Chamberlain. — The attendance here has been on tho decreaso for somo time, and has now dwindled down to 13. Very small schools I have

found as a rule, in every respect inferior to large ones, and Appleby is by no means an exception. Ifc seems, indeed, next to impossible for either teacher or scholars to shake off the depressing influences of a school where the attendance is at once thin and irregular. It is, therefore, on the double grounds of economy and of superior educational efficiency that I advocate the closing of tins school, in order that the few scholars who continue to attend, may be induced to go to tho Wahnea West school, which the completion of the bridge will bring practically within little more than a mile of the Appleby school. Those who live too far to tho eastward to adopt this course will find, I apprehend, little difficulty in reaching either the Eiclnnond or the Ranzau school. Hope — Mr. Ladley. — So long as the children continue to attend school with such extreme irregularity, a high standard of attainment cannot reasonably be looked for at Hope school. The present master, who has greatly improved in teaching power since lie had charge of Eighty-eight Valley school, several years ago, has, very properly confined Ins attention almost exclusively to grounding his scholars in tho rudiments of reading, writing and arithmetic, in all of which, but especially tho last, they were very deficient. As only 5 out of 53 scholars have remained at school during tho past year until they had completed their twelfth year, it would be a waste of time to attempt anything more. Eanzau — Mr. and Mrs. Kiody. — When I last visited this school, in Hay, the teachers had been appointed only a few days, and could not, therefore, be considered responsible for tho then educational status of the school, which appeared, however, to be well conducted. Tested by tho annual returns, the school seems to have retrograded during tho past year, in both reading and writing, the numbers marked "good" under those heads in 1867 being respectively 20 and 18, as against 14 and 7 in 1868, the numbers at school during both years being about equal. The great decrease in the number of children over 12 will partly explain this falling off, which I find it difficult otherwise to account for, the late master being both painstaking and experienced. Instances of a similar ebb and flow, as it were, have not been wanting in our best conducted schools, and should teach extreme caution in drawing conclusions as to tho capabilities of any teacher based on a short experience, a school being emphatically il plant of slow growth, and sensitive to many influences external to that of the teacher himself. River Terrace — Mrs. Bryant. — A considerable increase has taken place in the attendance at this little school lately, 26 scholars being now present daily. As the children are very fairly taught, and extremely orderly, the experiment of substituting a mistress for a master may be considered as, on the whole, successful, both on the score of pecuniary saving and of efficiency, though such a change is only practicable in a small school. Spring Grove, Boys — Mr. Edmunds. — This is an exceedingly well-taught, but somewhat clamorous school — the noise, being, however, as far as I could iudge. the noiso of work only. The schoolroom is insufficient to accommodate properly the 35 boys who now attend daily, and the addition of a small classroom, such as tho girls' school is provided with, would render the present school at once more hcnlthy and mQTo orderly, At my last examination, I found tho boys, who were formerly dull and backward, much improved in point of intelligence, thcro was an unusually large pro|)orlion of good readers and arithmeticians. The boys were also generally well trained in geography. Spring Grove, Girls — Mrs. Harrington, Miss Wratt, assistant. — Tho high rate of attendance here, (87 per cent, during tho last quarter), may be taken as an indication of the popularity of the school. I have observed, too, ■with pleasure, that a larger proportion of the girls remain at school after 12 years of ago than is usual in the country schools. The beneficial results of this arc clearly shown in the returns, which record, in almost every branch, a standard far above tho average. The discipline and method of teaching leave nothing to be desired, and it is cvidont that under the able superintendence of the present teacher this must ere long be classed amongst the first of our schools. Loioer Walcefield — Mr. and Mrs. Chattock. — Undor tho energetic management of the present teacher, Lower Wakefield, which at one time occupied a very inferior place, is gradually taking a respectable rank among our country schools. The reading, which was not long ago so low and indistinct as to be almost inaudible, is now clear and well emphasised. The handwriting is also generally very neat ; but some time must elapse before tho arithmetic of even the most forward scholars can be brought to the level of our best schools. I have observed that a class register is kept both here and at tho Spring Grovo girls' school. Upper WahefieU—M.v. and Mrs. Powell. — The numbers attending here have largely increased during the last twelve months, 46 scholars being now present daily, giving an average of 83 per cent. Tho general management of the school is at once kindly and firm, tho gradation of classes is carefully kept, and all the children are fully employed during school hours. Tho reading continues generally good, and the arithmetic, which was formerly unusually backward, has perceptibly improved 11110101' the present management. I was sorry to observe, however, that so marked a falling off had taken place in the writing that I was unable to record a single specimen of writing as " good " on my last visit. Fox Kill — Miss Hindo. — I can record little or no progress in this school, which shows a daily attendance of only 10, and an average of 55 per cent, for tho past year. The attendance of the elder children, in particular, is so extremely irregular as to render anything like systematic teaching impossible. Under these circumstances, the teacher, who is thoroughly competent, cannot be held responsible for tho languishing state of the school, especially as a precisely similar state of things prevailed under the management of her predecessors. This is simply one of those cases in which the parents have themselves to thank for tho ill-taught condition of their children. Waimea West Villatje — Mr. Iliggin, Mrs. Hansen assistant. — This school has never taken a high place, and is still somewhat in the background, though tho rate of attendance for tho year, 65 per cent, is quite equal to that of the generality of our schools, and the number of scholars over 12 has doubled during tho same period. Arithmetic is tho strong point of tho school, great attention being evidently paid to this branch. Map drawing is also successfully taught. But the reading and writing are of barely averago merit. Waimea West North Division — Mr. Thorburn. — Though tho children attending this school are generally much younger than those who were present at tho previous annual examination, I found no falling off in any respect, except in the arithmetic of the first class, which was sufficiently accounted for by tho fact that tho average ago of tho present Ist class is only 10. It is noticeable that writing is taught by means of copies set by the master, and is of uniform excellence. The daily attendance for tho past year having been under 30, no difficulty would bo felt in accommodating the additional numbers who might be expected to attend hero if my suggestion as to the closing of Appleby school were adopted, but any considerable increaso of scholars would render the appoinknonfc of an assistant teacher necessary. Upper Moutere — Mr. and Mrs. Cook. — The attondanco hero continues to be very large ; I found 58 children present at my last visit. The withdrawal of children from school at an earlier age than formerly, tells against tho more advanced classes, particularly in arithmetic, in which branch I found no scholar sufficiently advanced to attempt a simple question in practice. I could detect, however, very little fulling oft' in reading, while there was a decided improvement in penmanship. Tho discipline of the school was, as usual, excellent. Lower Moutere — Mr. Eobson. — The daily attendance here, winch at 0110 time fell off very seriously, has latterly risen to 28, a number still below the capabilities of the teacher. The increase in numbers has, however, enabled him to double the number of good readers, and to show marked progress in both writing and arithmetic. The remarkably neat and legible figures of tho scholars are deserving of special notice, because this, though apparently a minor point, is really of more importance than tho generality of our teachers suppose, and is too often neglected. On

the whole, I think that the public will have little to complain of when the bulk of the Provincial schools attain the level of Lower Moutere. Patigatotara—Mv. Brown. — In respect of attendance this school stands lowest on the fist, the average during the past year being at the rate of only 42 per cent. This will sufficiently account for the general inferiority of the reading, while it is to the teacher's credit that; the writing and arithmetic are, in spite of so serious a drawback, of more than average marifc. Mental arithmetic is also well taught. 3fotueka, Ist Division — My. Bisley. — This school, which always took a high rank, has certainly not lost ground under the present master. The reading and writing aro creditable throughout, the arithmetic being worthy of special praise. Collective lessons in geography, grammar, and mental arithmetic 'are frequently given to the whole school, with the best results. It is to be regretted that this practice is nob more common. The arrangement of the classes, and the general discipline of the school are also excellent. Motuelca, 2nd Division — Mrs. Homaun. — About 30 pupils who are, with few exceptions, under nine years of age, receive a good preparatory training for tho upper school in this division. The children struck me as being very well behaved. • RiwaJca— Mr. and Mrs. Severno.— Steady progress has been made in this school since last year, a marked improvement being discernible in the writing, which was formerly very slovenly. Considerable attention is still paid to arithmetic, which has long been successfully taught at this school, and the advanced scholars give ready and intelligent replies to questions in geography and history. The younger children are very carefully taught by Mrs. Soverne. Talcaka — Mr. Hannay, assisted by Mrs. Bcatson. — The proportion of children who continue to attend school after they are twelve years old is smaller hero than in any other of our country schools ; a high standard of attainment is not therefore to be looked for. In every branch, however, the educational returns for the present year compare favorably with those for 1867, more especially in writing and arithmetic. The first class now know something of geography and history, subjects not attempted previously. The percentage of attendance, 67, is high, when the state of tho roads and the broken nature of the country are taken into consideration. Want of room materially interfered with the proper working of the school at the time of my last visit, but a considerable addition to the building has been made since. Motupipi— Mv. Robinson. Only 14 children are now in daily attendance afc this, formerly one of the most flourishing of our country schools. The decrease in numbers took place, however, beforo tho appointment of the present innster, whose predecessor was remarkably successful as a teacher. It is therefore probably attributable to the movement of a considerable population higher up the valley. It is to bo hoped that the erection of a new schoolroom, distant about a mile from the present building, and apparently Avithin easy reach of a large number of children of school age, will tell favorably upon next year's returns. Long Plain — Miss Kcarns. This little school has been unfortunate in losing the services of two teachers Wltlim a comparatively slioi-b period. 'JMio young children, who attend somewhat irregularly, have been very well taught by their late mistress, whose resignation is to be regretted. Collingwood — Air. Halcombo, assisted by Mrs. Ellis. The general tone of this school appeared to me vory good, on my last visit, tho children being remarkably orderly and attentive. But, after due allowance had been mado for the small proportion of childron present above 12 years old, the attainments of tho scholars generally struck mo as being much below the average. I could find no readers or writers who could fairly be classed as "good," comparatively fow who came up to the standard of "moderate," and not a single scholar who could solve a question in proportion or practice. The rate of attendance for tho past year, 69 per cent, is however, somewhat higher than that of the majority of our schools. Cobden — Mr. Ray. Only a few weeks had elapsed since the opening of this school when I visited it, but I found it well organised and in good working order, the teacher being thoroughly up to liis work, and having the advantage of previous experience, 46 children were present when the school was oxamined, nearly all of whom were, as might be expected, very backward. Though I am conscious that in the foregoing description of the present condition of our Provincial schools, I havo not boon able to avoid tho tediousness almost inseparable from a scries of brief sketches presenting no very striking variety of feature, yet I venture to hope that I have made it abundantly clear that. we now number among our primary schools several of undoubted excellence — a still larger proportion that would be classed anywhere as good, and not more than five or six, at the outside, whose present state can be pronounced unsatisfactory. Throughout my Report great, possibly undue, prominence has been given to the teacher, for it should not be forgotten that the teacher is only one, though by far the most important of the several factors required to make a good school. The powers of Local Committees, for example, for good or for evil, are very groat, while the influence of parents, whether exerted in favor of or against a teacher, is almost irresistible. But to enumerate, and give their precise weight to the various local causes that affect the welfare of our schools would extend this Report to an intolerable length, and it will perhaps be sufficient to explain, once for all, that the accompanying tables of educational statistics, and tho necessarily brief remarks on the more striking characteristics of each school are merely a rough and ready means of showing results in a simple and intelligible form. W. C. Hodgson, Inspector of Schools.

Annual Hetuen of the Nelson Public Schools for the Year ending June 30, 1868, showing the Agea and Proficiency of the Children.

o o Lumbers. Under 7. 7 to 9. 9 to 12. 12 and «P" ■wards. Beginning. Moderate. fed .8 Good. Beginning. Moderate. 3 Good. Simple rules. Compound rules. a 'roportion & Practice. Fractions, eeimals, &c. Geogeaphy. Histoey. GEABrMAB.

1. Nelson Boys — Ist Division 2. „ „ 2nd „ 3. „ Gii-ls— lst „ 4. „ „ 2nd „ 5. „ Preparatory 6. j, Haven-road 7. „ Hauipden-strcet . 8. „ St. Mary's 80y5... 9. „ „ Girls... 10. Hillside 11. Clifton Terrace 12. Stoke 13. Eiclimond Boys 14. „ Girls 15. Appleby 16. Kauzau 17. Hope 18. Eivcr Terrace 19. Spring Grove Boys 20. „ „ Girls 21. Wakefield, Lower 22. „ Upper 23. Foxhill 24. "Wahnca West Village ... 25. „ North Division 26. Moutere, Upper 27. „ Lower... 28. Motueka, Ist Division ... 29. „ 2nd „ 30. Pangatotara 31. Eiwaka 32. Takaka 33. Motnpipi 34. Collingwood 35. Long Plain , 36. Cobden 75 153 129 117 230 140 143 119 47 52 32 86 70 94 34 87 53 41 56 73 77 58 30 89 53 74 56 | 62 56 31 74 58 22 27 26 54 "6 1 35 19 64 36 46 26 40 10 29 97 62 38 45 14 48 2 77 3 76 44 43 72 85 34 44 43 62 31 67 80 22 41 6 39 6 69 72 32 29 75 76 95 75 76 75 757 5 76 95 13 194 36 59 17 14 41 44 41 12 16 14 38 17 14 21 11 11 10 22 19 5 18 5 7 10 19 16 8 6 14 11 15 13 25 1 8 15 5 5 5 3 5 74 230 55 107 33 20 48 13 29 16 32 15 38 26 40 10 26 19 22 13 26 9 19 13 16 14 23 14 41 37 23 57 11 83 43 32 58 8 18 11 25 23 24 11 24 9 14 6 15 17 16 8 20 18 19 3 2 10 6 10 5 28 3 7 5 1 7 22 33 26 29 7 22 32 15 27 12 11 7 11 14 14 9 9 12 11 11 14 16 9 8 21 14 19 23 19 20 45 24 59 11 27 13 24 28 52 9 2G 20 15 25 21 16 27 8 16 15 19 24 47 45 24 59 45 24 59 11 27 5 24 28 52 9 14 20 15 25 21 32 27 8 16 15 19 24 47 12 4 17 10 18 10 21 18 14 15 16 18 24 12 31 20 7 14 13 8 21 16 23 8 17 12 10 10 18 15 13 4 36 13 12 12 36 22 17 18 47 27 17 19 26 36 26 17 57 24 32 19 8 5 12 22 37 6 14 7 ! 2 24 21 32 8 5 24 14 37 6 5 1 1 19 8 3 6 3 11 15 6 27 5 24 28 21 9 14 20 8 25 | 21 ' 16 13 22 34 11 31 18 10 21 20 28 13 8 8 9 20 20 26 5 11 23 3 25 18 22 17 15 23 21 9 24 &9 14 16 18 10 13 13 6 14 14 14 14 24 8 15 21 14 6 16 14 17 11 14 22 17 2 16 14 22 21 20 12 9 21 4 16 15 "i 13 ... 32 9 11 22 9 21 15 4 10 10 13 16 15 19 23 21 31 13 20 8 15 8 10 18 9 14 10 9 16 15 9 24 21 io 21 io 21 28 3 15 16 6 7 10 24 22 7 5 56 12 33 38 13 18 12 24 21 7 9 10 13 7 17 9 2 9 16 13 8 5 6 16 6 21 8 4 4 5 5 11 8 11 7 25 16 6 5 9 8 io 13 10 6 17 4 4 6 17 3 2 19 26 12 I 5 4 2 o 9 41 12 5 4 "9 12 5 2 "i 1 3 12 16 36 "5 t) 8 8 '" 2678 729 671 819 459 1262 794 622 668 536 350 608 385 425 237 893 746 855

Keturns of Quarterly Attendance, at the Nelson Public Schools, for the half-year ending 30th June, 1868.

o o Boys. Girls. Total. 3 School Days. g Daily Attendance. Per centage. Boys. Girls. Total. <© I School Days. I Daily Attendance. W Total.

1. Nelson Boys — Ist division 2. „ „ 2nd „ 3. „ Girls Ist „ 4. „ „ 2nd „ 5. „ Preparatory... 6. „ Haven-road . . . 7. „ Hampdon-streefc 8. Hillside 9. Clifton Terrace 10. Stoke 11. Richmond — Boys ... 12. „ Girls ... 13. Appleby 14. Ranzau 15. Hope 16. River Terrace 17. Spring Grove — Boys 18. „ Girls 19. Lower "Wakefield ... 20. Upper „ 21. Pox Hill 22. Waimea West Village 23. „ North division 24. Moutere Upper 25. „ Lower 26. Motueka — Ist division 21. „ 2nd „ 28. Pangntotara* 29. Riwaka 30. Takaka, 31. Motupipi 32. Long Plain 33. Collingwood 34. St. Mary's— Boys ... 35. „ „ Girls ... 36. Cobden 56 104 79 54 75 19 16 42 54 16 27 15 20 50 33 26 4 29 31 30 22 26 23 17 39 29 12 8 9 87 ... 90 89 41 22 54 19 16 31 11 1 23 25 18 58 35 56 104 90 89 120 76 129 38 32 73 54 77 23 50 40 38 50 58 68 54 18 58 44 66 41 53 40 35 76 54 45 48 45 46 46 44 43 45 54 45 41 44 49 48 56 55 56 52 51 50 56 41 45 50 50 53 52 42 43 42 42 85 61 38 76 50 86 20 25 56 38 55 13 36 23 26 33 41 44 43 74 81 68 42 | 63 i 65 67 50 i 78 ' 77 ! 71 | 70 59 72 57 68 66 70 64 | 79 | 55 I 57 114 77 65 78 22 17 45 53 16 36 17 23 46 33 28 4 32 30 34 22 24 22 85 79 40 41 65 10 17 31 77 4 28 24 18 i ... 53 38 28 15 29 13 34 19 29 23 57 114 85 79 117 106 143 32 34 76 53 77 20 64 41 41 46 53 71 56 19 61 43 68 41 53 45 53 53 54 56 56 53 53 53 63 57 49 49 52 51 59 48 41 49 53 48 44 55 59 53 58 45 45 38 80 58 49 77 65 105 16 24 54 39 61 13 37 27 26 35 46 53 47 13 48 29 48 28 34 29 66 70 68 62 65 60 73 50 70 71 73 79 64 72 66 63 77 87 74 83 67 78 67 70 67 75 60 28 14 29 13 36 19 21 19 18 37 25 20 13 25 10 34 25 43 27 34 27 17 41 37 15 14 25 59 58 I 57 65 64 64 67 40 54 77 69 69 73 67 32 21 34 87 38 40 58 51 35 28 13 9 10 92 34 26 12 14 24 69 54 25 23 34 92 46 56 46 39 49 53 49 55 19 55 39 33 14 14 21 62 35 43 55 60 56 51 63 67 77 76 ... I i 33 46 23 - ! I I I i ; 1032 928 1960 1289 65 li 1115 979 2094 1440 68 *]S T i return for une qi larter,

letubitb op Quaeteelt Attendance at the Nelson Public Schools, for the Half-year ending 31st December, 1867.

EG o Boys. I-" oo Girls. Total School Days. Daily Attendance. I w Per Centage. Boys. Girls. Total School Days. t Daily Attendance. 3 Per Ccntagc.

1. Nelson Boys — Ist division ... 2- „ „ 2nd „ ... 3. „ Girls— lst „ ... 4. „ „ 2nd „ ... 5. „ Preparatory 6. „ Haven-road 7. „ Hampden-street ... 8. Hillside 9. Clifton Terrace 10. Stoke 11. Richmond — Boys 12. „ Girls 13. Appleby 14. Eauzau , 15. Hope 16. River Terrace 17. Spring Grove — Boys 18. „ „ Girls 19. Lower Wakefield 20. Upper „ 21. Foxhill 22. Waimea West Village 23. „ North division ... 24. Moutere, Upper 25. „ Lower 26. Motueka — Ist division 27. „ 2nd „ 28. Pangatotara 29. Riwaka 30. Takaka 31. Motupipi 32. Long Plain 33. Collingwood 34. St. Mary's— Boys 35. „ „ Girls 36. Cobden 62 107 85 76 50 24 62 107 85 76 124 67 50 50 50 50 50 49 44 76 57 41 72 42 72 70 67 54 57 62 58 106 ... 93 75 58 22 58 106 93 75 142 70 56 57 58 59 59 57 v 90 62 47 91 51 76 84 66 62 64 72 74 43 84 48 16 17 45 54 19 29 19 20 47 29 26 4 29 32 34 20 27 17 16 39 31 12 12 13 16 17 27 70 10 24 23 14 60 35 25 14 32 13 28 23 22 22 22 39 28 6 12 21 32 34 72 54 70 29 53 42 34 47 60 64 51 18 61 45 62 43 49 39 38 78 59 18 24 34 63 50 48 50 52 54 58 47 47 47 48 59 64 64 45 41 60 54 62 62 43 49 49 55 46 42 17 16 45 28 37 15 31 23 22 31 28 45 41 6 36 29 35 23 32 19 19 48 36 12 14 24 54 47 63 51 53 52 56 54 64 67 46 69 83 40 58 70 56 53 65 48 50 61 60 68 59 70 18 17 45 53 16 30 18 21 44 I ... 33 26 3 30 33 31 24 25 19 16 42 28 9 8 9 83 17 18 33 71 10 26 25 21 63 35 28 14 31 14 34 25 19 22 22 41 26 7 12 19 35 35 78 53 71 26 56 43 42 44 63 68 54 17 61 47 65 49 44 41 38 83 54 16 20 28 83 60 60 55 60 53 57 56 53 55 56 56 52 61 55 53 60 59 57 44 44 47 49 52 55 50 28 57 26 23 59 38 52 15 41 23 24 32 44 50 44 10 41 32 31 29 25 26 14 47 38 13 12 24 56 75 65 76 71 70 57 71 54 58 75 70 71 70 58 67 68 47 60 56 62 30 56 70 80 58 85 67 "' ... ... - ... - ... ... ... ... 893 838 1731 1044 60 977 881 1858 1254 64

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Bibliographic details

STATE OF EDUCATION IN NELSON PROVINCE., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXVII, 5 September 1868

Word Count
7,183

STATE OF EDUCATION IN NELSON PROVINCE. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXVII, 5 September 1868

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