Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Local Intelligence.

Nelson Habmonic Society. — We have been requested to state that the compositions selected for rehearsal at the usual weekly practice of the Society this evening, are the two motetts, " Quod orbe," by Hummel, and " Splendente te Dem," by Mozart, with Macfarren's Cantata, " The May-day."

Land Sale. — A sale of Crown lands took place in the Land Office, on Monday last, which produced £13,800. The land sold was all in the Aniuri, chiefly on the Balmoral run, and ifc had been assessed at from 10s. to 15s. an acre. A brisk competition took place for many of the sections, several of which brought £1 an acre.

Stereoscopic Exhibition. — Our readers will perceive, from an advertisement in another column, that Mr. Davis, the photographer, of Hardy-street, has opened an exhibition of some new and interesting stereoscopic views, lately received from home, to which he invites the inspection of the public.

Nelson and Marlbobotjgh Coast Steam Navigation Company (Limited). — The adjourned general meeting of shareholders in this Company was held at the Trafalgar Hotel, Nelson, on Friday evening, the 3rd instant. After an animated discussion on tbapYeaeut condition and future prospects of the Company, the following resolution was proposed and carried : — " That the Company continue its operations, and accept the offer of the steamer Nelson from the Trustees of the Nelson Trust Funds." It was resolved also, " That the amount now due on the 7th call, made payable on the 19th of March, be called up forthwith." Cradle fob Steamers. — In a recent number we adverted to the fact that the New Zealand Steam Navigation Company, whose head-quarters are at Wellington, had decided on erecting a cradle in Nelson harbour on account of there being insufficient rise and fall of tide for that purpose at Wellington. The three-masted schooner Manukau, which recently arrived from that port, and the Steamer Wellington brought here a quantity of timber for the construction of this cradle, so that we may hope speedily to see a work in our harbour, (undertaken by shareholders in another province), which will go far to prove tlie injurious result of the laissez alter policy pursued by our Government with regard to the patent slip or dry dock, proposed to be constructed here.

Pakawatj Coal. — We have been shown a sample of coke made from the Pakawau Coal, viz., from the small coal raised from a lower seam by means of boring. Although the coal when brought up was in fine powder, as is always the case with coal bored in this manner, the coke made therefrom is in one solid, shining piece. Our readers are probably aware that the fact of " caking together " is a most certain characteristic of bituminous coal, and distinguishes the Newcastle coal of Australia and England in a most marked manner from the four other distinct varieties of coal, viz., Anthracite, Cherry coal, Cannel coal, and Lignite, or Brown coal, no two pieces of which csn by any means be made to unite. We mention this fact with the more pleasure, as wo have always advocated the working of the Pakawau coal-field in spite of the assertions of our would be savans who denounced this coal as a lignite. We wish the enterprising Company, 1 who are engaged in operations at Pakawau, every success, and we may here observe, that information has been received of the rumoured discovery there of a fine seam of coal five feet in thickness.

A DIGGEB DEOWNED IN CROSSING THE WAIBATJ Riveb. — In the early part of last week, a party of three men arrived at Jeffries' Accommodation House, on their way down the Wairau, but the horse which should have been on the spot to convey foot-travel-lers over the river was absent, and the men had therefore to cross the river on foot, and, in making this attempt, one of the poor fellows lost his footing, and was drowed. We have not heard the name of the man, but he was from Canterbury, where he has left a wife and family. For the purpose of assisting foot-travellers to cross the Wairau, a free license and a valuable sheep-run are given to the occupier of the Accommodation House in question, but it seems these are insufficient to secure for travellers the attention thay stand in need of. We hope the Marlborough Government will institute an inquiry into the cause of this accident, and, if the facts are as they have been told to us, a new tenant for the house should at once be found.

Cobonee's Inquest. — A Coroner's inquest was held on the 6th June, at the Wakefield Arms, before Thomas Connell, Esq., Coroner, touching the death of Charles Verrey, aged about forty-four years, who had been drowned in the Wai-iti river. Mr. Thomas Tunnicliffe said he spoke to deceased at about seven o'clock on the evening preceding his death ; he was then walking along the road leading to his house, and which also led to the Wai-iti river. He thought deceased " was not a person of sound mind or judgment ; but that he was somewhat simple and weakminded." " and required constant attention." The verdict of the jury was, " That deceased died from drowning by accident on the Ist June."

The Picton Escoet. — The second issue of the Kavelock Mail, published on the 4th instant, has the following paragraph with reference to the amount of gold received in Picton by the last Escort : — " On Thursday last we issued an Extraordinary, containing intelligence of the arrival of the Escort from the gold-fields, with 1,736 ounces 5 pennyweights ; * but these figures do not represent anything like an estimate of the quantity of gold held by the miners, and which would have been transmitted were the police in a position to undertake its safe conveyance to town. In one instance they were compelled to refuse taking charge of forty-two pounds weight, having only one pack-horse and but four men to convey the precious freight. We understand the Escort will be continued weekly, and trust the Government will augment its strength, as at present it is found to be inadequate to discharge the duties required of it. The state of the roads demands prompt attention j another week's delay, and they will be blocked up, impassable for man and beast.

The Government Fiee Engine. — Most of our readers are aware that a very powerful fire engine, ordered by the Government, arrived in Nelson about ten months since. When brought on shore, it was put into the hands of an engineer to be tested. The trial, it was understood at the time, was anything but satisfactory ; nevertheless, the Government, apparently contented with the result, ordered it to be housed in an open, dilapidated shed, close to the Government Buildings, promising at the same time that a suitable building should be erected for its reception. It has remained ever since in the same place, no one being appointed to take charge of it, and no force organized to work it. However, a few days since, it appears that it was determined to test the capabilities of the engine, and, in the presence of several of the Government officials, a trial of its powers was made. The result was just what might have been expected. It was ascertained beyond the shadow of a doubt, that, had a fire occurred in this city within the last ten months, at least three quarters of an hour must have elapsed before the engine could have been put in decent working order. We need not picture to our readers the utter and almost irrecoverable ruin which would have awaited us, had a like conflagration taken place here, as laid waste such large blocks of property in the city of Dunedin and Invercargill. Tardily as this step has been taken, it is, at all events, some consolation that the Government has at length thought proper to take some action in the matter. The engine is now in the hands of Mr. Gore, who is employed in putting it in thorough working order. The organization of an efficient force, as a fire brigade, next demands our attention, and we trust that no time will be lost in securing so desirable an object. The Dunedin Fire Brigade is a body of which any city might be proud, and the services which they have already rendered to their fellow citizens on many occasions, when the most imminent peril threatened the whole city, have been frequently and publicly acknowledged. Surely the inhabitants of Nelson, alive as every individual member of its population must be, to the danger which daily and nightly threatens us, will not refuse to join conamore in the reorganization, on a much enlarged scale, of the little volunteer brigade, which Nelson once could boast.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18640611.2.23

Bibliographic details

Local Intelligence., Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIII, Issue 70, 11 June 1864, Supplement

Word Count
1,461

Local Intelligence. Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XXIII, Issue 70, 11 June 1864, Supplement

Working