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TOWN AND COUNTRY.

Mons. and Madamh Sjmonben,—A concert in behalf of tlio building fund of the Lyttelton Colonists' Society, will tuko placo on Monday ovoning next, nt tho Coloniats' Society's rooms, Thbatbb Rotal.—Tho porformancos nt this theatro Inst night wore much tlio same as thoso of tho previous evening, consisting of tho" Slicop in Wolf's Clothing," and the entertainments of tlio Martinctti Troupe, Tlio house vrns but thinly attended, Colonial Phizes.—Tho shooting for tlio flrst sot of thoso prizes is progressing nt Hillsborough, and in other parts of tho provlnco whore voluntoors do congregate; and by favour of Captain and Adjutant Uookes, we will givo an oflloial account of tho scores not yet published wlion tho matches nro over. Magisterial, At tho Resident Magistrate's Court Lyttelton, yesterday, judgment for plaintiffs wore recorded in tho following easeaPalmer v. Tooraey, £26 18s; Lyttelton Municipal Council v. Griffiths, £3O ; Cameron Brothers, v, Graham, £l2 2s 3d; Roper y, Jones, £3, Tho cases of Oliver v, Sheppard, and Williamson v, Oldfleld, were adjourned. Tiie Simonskn Concerts.—The attendance at the Town Hall last night was an improvement, but still far short of tvlmt it ought to have been, looking at the programme, and the fact that the performances were under the patronage of the Jockey Club. We have no space for a full notice, and mußt, therefore, content ourselves with saying that the principal performers were as successful as they have been on all former occasions City Council Nomination.—As will be seen fsom our report of the proceedings at the Town Hall, yesterday, there are two new candidates, for tbo office resigned by Mr Hislop, namely Mr Sheppard, of Colombo street, and Mr St Queutin, who represents the interests of the Northern distriot of the city. The show of hands was in favour of the former, a poll being demanded by the latter. The four retiring members, Messrs Duncan, Jameson, Ruddenklau, and Tombs were re-elected by a large majority on the show of hands. The other candidates are Messrs Allen, Hart, Nairn, and Heece, and a poll, to take, place this day, at the Town Clerk's office, between the hours of 10 a.m, and 4 p.m., was demanded, on his own and their behalf, by Mr Allen. Intending voters are requested'to attend as early as possible, as there are so many names to be taken. A.O.F.—The half-yearly meeting of the Canterbury united district, took place on Monday last, at the Foresters' Hall, Christohureh. The following delegates took their respective seats s—Court Queen of the Isles, Lyttelton, P.D.C.R. Br. Wilcox, P.C.R. Br. AllrigVit; Court Star of Canterbury, P.C.R. Br. Pine, and |Br. J.M. Thompson; Court Southern Cross, Timaru, P.C.R. Br. Stimson. The D.C.R. opened the meeting in the usual form, and after the general business had been disposed of, the D.C.R. proceeded with the election of officers for the ensuing twelve months, when P.C.R. Allright was duly elected to the office of D.C.H., P.C.R. Pine to the office of D.S.C.R., P.D.C. Crooks was duly elected district treasurer, and P.D.C.R. Br. Allison was duly elected district secretary, in place of P.C.R. Br. Foley resigned. The D.C.11. then introduced the newly elected officers to their respective'places, and a vote of thanks was recorded to the retiring officers for their zeal in discharging their respective duties during the past twelve months. The officers and delegates, after the close of the meeting, adjourned to Br. Osborne's, where a substantial luncheon had been provided, to which ample justice was done. The next half-yearly meeting will be held at the Foresters' Hall, Lyttelton,

The Late Fire in Lyttelton.—An inquest was held yesterday at the Albion Hotel, Lyttelton, before W.Donald, Esq., the coroner, and a jury, of which MrC. VV. H. Woledge was foreman, to inquire into the causes of the late fire in London and Canterbury streets, on the night of the 12th instant. The jury having viewed the premises, the following evidence was takenW. Smyth deposed that he was a constable in the armed police. He was on duty on the evening of the 12th inßtant in London street. On getting near to Mr Percy's shop, he observed a light on the pavement near to the house, at the corner of Canterbury and London streets. He than proceeded to the spot and found the fire coming from the window looking on to London Btreet. He immediately gave the alarm, and roused Mr Austin and the neigh bours. After the fire had been extinguished, he examined the scene of the fire and found some straw bottle envelopes, smelling strongly of kerosine, and a quantity of rags, 'i he articles were on a heap of Btones, Access could easily have been obtained from the rear of the premises. The fire appeared to originate in the corner where the rags and straw were deposited. William Austin deposed that he was a tinsmith, residing in London street next door to the scene of the late fire. About 9.15 p.m., while at supper he heard a noise like a man crawling over the roof of the adjoining house. His wife went out but was unable to see anythiug. He had sold kerosene, but now had discontinued to do so. He had never seen any envelopes similar to those produced in the house, or rags. He did not know any person who wore a silver ring similar to the one produced. His property was not insured. Mary Austin, the wife of the former witness corroborated the evidence of her husband. The evidence of Richard Scott and Sergeant Baker was taken, and the inquest was adjourned till 6 p.m. on Monday next, at the Albion hotel.

The Temperance Society.—Yesterday the Christchurch Temperance Society held its annual festival and public meeting. The former commenced about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, in the paddock of Mr Prinsin Armagh street. The muster of celebrants, however, was not great, and the whole gala contrasted unfavourably with those of former years. There was no Band of Hope with its drums and fifes, no gymnastic apparatus, no instrumental music of any sort, and no tent to dignify and overshadow the managing officials. There was not a scarcity of children, but the smallest amongst them might liare multiplied their parents and guardians by two without an effort. The juveniles amused themselves with crioket, kiss-in-the-ring, and racing. The kissing in the ring was a very tame affair, and so it is in general, but the boys at the stumps handled the bat and ball with such energy and adroitness as are characteristic of boys who have derived their origin from Old England. The racing was better still, perhaps because it was performed under the stimuli of handfuls of nuts and other small meats. The competitors were of both sexes, and some of them were of very tender yearß, but the stakes were all well contested, and long races were run by short legs in n style which showed that teetotallßm( wiß friendly to length of wind. We liavQ remarked that a meeting of teetotallers is never considered . complete without » little speech • makjnf( and although the adults ' of the present gathering were, to hold a public v meeting. intlie evening, tliey coiild not fcfraiti from-11 moderate Indulgence .in' this luxury ill the gala | ground. . Accordingly they gathered themselves together in a,shady part of the paddock,, where ; a trap was conveniently aiid after singing a pleasant'tain peranoo .melody, voted Mr Flornnco, thp president of tho society, into tlie chair, and tho Inevitable yocal episode was enacted, We 6nn, however, flml space for only a few word'' from the chairman, lie said that while several modical men in Great Britain had adopted the teetotal prinoiplo, ho was the only one in Christchurch who had Identified himself with the good cause. Tec-totalism was not now looked on in England as a vagary which would'be cast out of the mind as reason ciime in, it was an established thing, and numbered among its votaries clergymen, lawyers, doctors, and other men of eduoation and position, that its influence was extending Itself through Europe, and that the future relative position of the Anglo-Saxon raeo would bo determined by the degree in which they wero recipients of tho influence. The proceedings were wound-up by tea and a public meeting, in which the adults participated at the Odd Fellows' Hall,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18680115.2.12

Bibliographic details

TOWN AND COUNTRY., Lyttelton Times, Volume XXIX, Issue 2205, 15 January 1868

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TOWN AND COUNTRY. Lyttelton Times, Volume XXIX, Issue 2205, 15 January 1868

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