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CHRISTCHURCH.

The polling for the town took place last Saturday, and at first Mr. Fooks took the •lead. Mr. Sewell,. however, gradually drew .ahead, and at the close of the poll was in a majority of 27 ; the final numbers being— For Mr. Sewell 61 ; Mr. Fooks .......... 34 The Returning Officer having declared Henry Sewell, Esq., to be duly elected, that .gentleman came forward and said he should be wanting in proper respect to the constituency .of Christchurch if he did not, according to usual custom, address them a few -parting words. It was impossible for any one not to feel gratified at being elected, by his fellow citizens, to an office of the greatest trust which they could bestow. Under present-circumstances he felt deeply the ■generous confidence placed in him. It had been said that the result of the present election would have a peculiar significance ; -that by-electing him, as the agent of the Canterbury Association, the constituency of Christchurch would virtually sanction and adopt all the acts and transactions of that .body. That objection had been raised in .the course of his canvass by some whom he jiad. the.pleasure of regarding as his personal (friends,, and who, on other, grounds, might .have supported him. He disclaimed any •such misconstruction of the true meaning of 'this election (hear hear). The transactions of the Canterbury association would have to be fairly examined by the Provincial Council, when established. All which the electors of Christchurch had this day decided was, that they would return, as their representative to the General Assembly, the person whom they thought best qualified to serve them, without being influenced by prejudice- or party feeling—(hear, hear)-.—-.They had also shown that, in judging the -.past;-aetsr-of the Canterbury Association, they would be governed by a spirit of fairness .and candour, which was all he asked for. He concluded by acknowledging the personal courtesy which he had received -throughout the election, both from opponents and supporters —(cheers). Mr. Fooks addressed a few words to the electors, thanking them for the support he had received. He made some allusion to intimidation, which he asserted had been .exercised, otherwise the result of the election might have been different. The proceedings terminated by a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer.

We understand that it is in contemplation to erect, by subscription, a Town-Hall in Christchurch. The want of a sufficiently large building, for public meetings, balls, concerts, &c, has long been fell.; and now

that the Provincial Council is on the eve of meeting, the want of a suitable building for their deliberations, increases the necessity of such an erection being promptly taken in hand. £1,000 are required, and already, we learn that upwards of £400 have been subscribed, in shares of £1 each. As a mere speculation there can be no question that the undertaking will pay a handsome percentage to those who invest their money in it. We are happy to congratulate our fellowtownsmen on the erection of a public clock. A subscription for the purpose was raised a considerable time ago, and a clock ordered from England. It is now being placed in a turret, over the central window of the Postoffice, facing London-street, and willprove a great acquisition to those who are desirous of knowing the time of day. The clock is a first-rate chronometer one, and from the celebrated firm of James M'Cabe & Co*, Cornhill, London. Its cost, together with the expenses of erecting the turret, &c, amounts to £30, the most of which has been subscribed. The list of subscribers will be given next week. Coroner's Inquest. —An inquisition was taken on Monday last on the body of Edward Storer, a child of three years old, swho was accidentally drowned in a small well, close to his father's door. The jury, after finding a verdict of Accidental death, handed to the coroner a paper signed by the foreman, urging the enclosing or covering in of the well. This is the second child drowned within a period of only four months, owing to the neglect of the simple precaution of fencing in or covering waterholes, and we urge on the public the danger incurred by such inadvertence. We learn from a private letter, that Mr. Moorhouse was returned, on Wednesday, as member to the House of Representatives for the Akaroa district. We have but scant particulars of the proceedings, but the final state of the poll is represented .to be— For Mr. Moorhouse,.... 27 Mr. R. H.Rhodes.. 17 Majority 10 The state of the poll was given on Wednesday evening, and William Sefton Moorhouse,.Esq., declared duly elected,! amidst the firing of guns and the cheers of his supporters.

Mr. Mat, in addressing the electors of Wellington, read the following letter from the Duke of Newcastle, which is, of some importance, as showing His.Grace's opinions respecting, the New Zealand Company's claims,on the Colony :— : "With regard to the Company's debt, he would state that he was in London at the time of the passing of the New Zealand Constitution Bill, and had entered into a correspondence with the Duke of Newcastle, in which he had stated his belief that the Company's claims were founded on fraud and misrepresentation (cheers). His Grace had returned a very gracious reply, which, with their leave, he would read to them. Mr. May then read this following note :— '17, Pbrtnian Square, June 28j 1852. 'Sir, —You will no'doubt have seen in the Parliamentary reports of the newspapers, that the clauses in the New Zealand Constitution Bill, to which you drew my attention in your letter of the 24th inst., were resisted by me both on the second reading of the Bill and in Committee. 'I regret much that the Bill has passed without alteration, and without, as I think, a fair and full consideration of the injustice of these particular clauses. I feel confident that the colony will derive advantage from many of the provisions of the measure, but this preliminary arrangement is a great blot upon its merits, and will, I fear, be looked upon as a grievance ;— it. may also be found a very practical inconvenience. ' I am, Sir, your very obedient servant, ' Newcastle.' 1 James May, Esq.'"

Friday Evening. By the Shepherdess, just arrived, we have received Wellington papers, to the 20th August, but. have no space for aught but a brief digest of news. There is a very large mail on board. Messrs. Gibbon Wakefield and Ludlam have been returned to the General Assembly, for the Hutt, without a contest: Capt. Rhodes for the Wellington Country District by a majority of 32, over his competitor, Mr. A. Brown :,and Messrs. Clifford, Kelham, and Hart for the town. The "Cornwall" and" Admiral Grenfell" from England, and the " Mountain Maid," Peacock, are in Wellington. Both the above vessels from England, contain cargo for Nelson and this port, and it has been arranged by the Commanders to transfer all the cargo for Nelso§' to the "Admiral Grenfell," while the cargo for this port will be brought on by the '/ Cornwall." This vessel left England on the 18th of April, and has some 130 passengers —amongst whom, are 18 for this port. The Messrs. Parkerson (2) and Miss Donald are amongst the number. The " Admiral Grenfell" left England on the 24th of May, and beat the " Cornwall" out, arriving in Wellington, one day before her. The "Admiral" has commenced his naval career well, being becalmed off the Molyneux, south of Otago, on the 84th day. A party of her passengers landed for an hour, amongst whom was a Mr. Weston, formerly of this settlement, in its earliest days, who has arrived per " Shepherdess." His Excellency the Governor, had taken his departure for Auckland, overland, but Lady Grey was still in Wellington. The " Catherine Ann" cutter, and " Endeavour" schooner may shortly be expected. At Auckland, Col. Wynyaid was elected Superintendant by a majority of 102. Mr. Brown had objected to the election on , technical grounds, and applied 'to the Supreme Court; but the Chieif Justice refused his application. | ......... *

Search for Sib John Franklin.—A Mr. Parker Snow has fitted out aLsmAlLjcesael r -not~—. more than sixteen tons burden, in which he is about to sail in search of traces of the missing crews of Sir John Franklin's expedition. Mr. Snow has published several letters, at different periods, in the Melbourne and Sydney journals, explaining the advantages which he conceives favour an attempt to discover the missing ships from the Pacific side, and entering into various details in reference to his projected voyage, of which it might he considered the public would desire to be informed. The undertaking is sufficiently interesting, from the originality and enthusiasm with which it has been conceived and'deliberately entered upon, to command the attention and the sympathies of a community having so much concern as this colony must have in the objects sought to be arrived at. But it is only right that we should inform the public of the entire confidence which several gentlemen of professional arid scientific knowledge repose in Captain Snow's ability to carry his project to a successful issue. In the mean time, the enterprising- adventurer, in this little cutter of 16 tons, will leave our shores hut ill-provided for his long and difficult voyage, if the inhabitants of this city do not extend to him adequate assistance. Already a few pounds have been contributed towards completing the necessary outfit, hut we are informed that the little vessel stands in need of many things yet, wliich there are no funds to provide. A list has been opened for contributions at the Exchange, and in the hands of one or two of our mercantile men ; and-we feel that we need not urge a matter of so much real interest upon the consideration of our readers. — Sydney Empire. Emigration.—According to a letter' in the Times, signed by the well-known signature ' P.' of the Traveller's Club, no less a sum than £9044 was remitted from Melbourne,by emigrants' thither, for the purpose of furnishing their kith'and kin with supplies to follow ihein. The statistics of the persons sent for.are, curious : there were 170 parents, 354 brothers and sisters, 25 wives, 102 nephews, aud 25 of other degrees of relationship.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18530827.2.12

Bibliographic details

CHRISTCHURCH., Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 138, 27 August 1853

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1,707

CHRISTCHURCH. Lyttelton Times, Volume III, Issue 138, 27 August 1853

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