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The Evening Star TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1889.

Tie first Order of the Day at to-day's sitting of the House was The the motion of the ColoRepre,e,,tation nial g ecretary fop the second reading of the Representation Bill. It consists of two operative clauses repealing those portions of the Act of 1887 which deal with the " quota," and enacts that in computing the population of the four chief cities of the Colony and every borough or town district within a mile of them, for representation purpose?, a deduction of 25 per cent, shall be made from the actual population. The city constituencies of Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, and .Dunedin are to be amalgamated, each city having three members assigned to it. The extent of the city districts is to be such that the population, after making the 25 per cent, deduction, shall not exceed or fall short by more than 750 for each member the quota multiplied by the number of members. In order to make up any city district, where the city itself does not include a sufficient population, the Commissioners may take in part of the environs of the adjacent suburban district if necessary. This feature of the amalgamation of city electorates appears to be very popular with members generally. Tho coal mines at Kawakawa have been flooded by heavy rain, and it is Baid work cannot be resumed for a week. It is notified in the ' Gazette' that " Major" Hammond, of the Salvationists, is authorised to celebrate marriages. The house at Wrey Bush from which one T. Clifford was evicted last week was mysteriously burned on Friday night. The Supreme Court case of Schmidt v, the City Corporation was resumed to-day, and had not concluded when we went to press.

The kinderßpiel * Flowers of the Forest' was repeated at St. Paul's Schoolroom last night to a large and decidedly appreciative audience. It has been so successful that, in response to numerous requests, the final representation will be given on Thursday evening.

The notorious Mrs Taylor is again in the hands of the Melbournejpolice on a charge of having perfoi-med an illegal Jopcration, and so caused the death of a young woman named Ellen Nolan, on June 12. This is the fifth time she has been similarly charged. A year ago she was discharged after serving two years' imprisonment. The difficulty between the Grey Valley Coal Company and the coal miners is still unsettled. At a meeting on Saturday evening the miners resolved to adhere to their demand for 2s lOd per ton off the shovel or 4d screened. The company offer 2s and S-J-d. Various sums are coming in in aid of the miners out of work, the total being LlO5 so far.

At last night's meeting of the Kaikorai Church Mutual Improvement Association Dr Ogston delivered a lecture on ' Travels in Norway' to a fairly large audience. The Doctor gave an interesting account of his travels in Norway, desoribing the history of the country, the habits of the people, and the beautiful scenery—not unlike that of New Zealand, some of the photographs shown by him reminding one of the West Coast Sounds and the scenery in the neighborhood of Lake Wakatipu. The lecturer was accorded a hearty vote of thanks. A curious point was raised at Napier yesterday by counsel for the defonce in a prosecution for a breach of the railway bylaws. The Commissioners were the nominal prosecutors. Clause 3 of the Act under which they were appointed provides that the major portion of the Act shall be in abeyance until brought into force by an Order-inCouneil, published in the 'Gazette.' No such order has been published, and the Magistrate upheld the objection and dismissed the summons. Others have previously been fined under the same by-law.

At the City Police Court this morning several charges of drunkenness were heard by Messrs J. M. Ritchie and J. Robin, the presiding Justices. Susan Chapman, one previous conviction, was fined ss, in default twenty-four hours' imprisonment; Thomas Barnett, sixteen previous convictions, L 3, in default seven days' imprisonment, there being a charge of disorderly conduct preferred against him. Sarah Brooke, _ eight previous convictions, was fined 10s, in default forty-eight hours' imprisonment; while two first offenders were dealt with in the usual manner.

A meeting of persons interested in the manufacture rr sale of artificial manures was held at Auckland yesterday to consider the proposal to insert a clause in the Trade Marks Bill compelling sellers of artificial manures to enclose in every package a certificate of quality and the character of contents, and providing a penalty for a false or fraudulent certificate. A resolution was passed expressing the opinion that the proposed clause would be unworkable and impracticable, and asking representatives in Parliament to oppose such a law. The opinion was also recorded that tho fertilisers supplied in this district have been of genuine quality. Matters in connection with Mr Santley's visit to Christchurch are assuming a peculiar form. Mr Wells wrote a letter to the * Lyttelton Times' stating that, as director of the local Musical Society, he was most willing to share in the honor with other musicians, but must keep to the arrangements made with Mr Poole—that Mr Santley should sing in 'Elijah' and at two ballad concerts, ' Elijah' to be repeated at the fourth concert. The Motet Sooiety had agreed to the above programme, and arranged for • Elijah' at the first evening (Mr Wells to conduct), a ballad concert on the second evening (with Messrs Wells and Searell as conductors), and a third evening ballad concert (with Mr Wallace as conductor), and 'Elijah,' if repeated, to be conducted by Mr Wells. Last night, at a meeting of delegates, Mr Acland, president of the Motet Society, resigned in consequents of the publication of Mr Wells's letter. The latter was called on for an explanation, which he declined to make in the presence of the reporters,

Mr Justice Gillies has adjourned an application for the discbarge of Robert Stevenson, u, bankrupt in whose case the penal clauses had been put into force, until it is shown that certain claims for wages have been paid.

The adjourned summoned meeting of the Loyal Dunedin Lodge will be held on Thursday. A limelight exhibition will be given by Mr P. A. Coxhead in All Saints' Schoolroom on Thursday evening. Tho Dunedin Orchestral Sooiety give their third concert of the season to-morrow evening in the Garrison Hall.

The Huntington centrifugal roller-crushiDg machinery will bo in operation at the Qrago Foundry to-morrow afternoon.

We think the Government Printer for a copy of Professor Long's rep >rt on the prospects cf dairy farming in this colony, together with practical hints on cheesemakiug. Farmers and others interested ato notified that free copies csn be obtained on application at any land office.

Tho Hugo Minstrels make their reappearance at the Princess's Theatre to-morrow night. Since their previous visit the company have undergone alteration, but their main Bourcea of attraction—Miss "Verne and the Hugo Brothers —are as popular as ever, They have had a wonderfully successful season in the North, and are sure to bo accorded a warm welcome from Dunedin audiences.

The members of L.O. Lodgo No. 12. William Johnston, met at Dunrlas street Primitive Methodist flnurch on Sunday morning, when the Rev. Joseph Sharp, chaplain of No. 12 L.O. L., and one of tho grand chaplain* of the Orange Institution in New Zealand, preached an impressive sermon from Colossians iii,, 16. There was a good muter of Orangemen and a large congregation. At the close of the sermon the minister explained to the congregation the origin, principles, and objects of the Orange Institution, together with the qualifications of an Orangeman. The Dunedin Nava's held their weekly drill on Thursday last, when the muster was fiftynine of all ranks. After drill Captain Smith, on behalf of the corps, presented Lieutenant Lodder with a signet ring, bearing a suitable inscription. In inakisg the presentation Oaptain Smith referred to Lieutenant Lcddor in highly eulogistic terms as an instructor, and expressed regret at losing bo competent an officer, Lieutenant Lodder ttianked the mem* hers of the corps for their present, and said that he hoped they would give the same attention to his successor's instruction as, he was plea°ed to say, they had given to his. The employes of Messrs A. and J. M'Farlane met last night in the Shamrock Hotel to bid good - bje to Mr Thomas Baxter, who is severing his connection with the firm. Mr Baxter has occupied tho position of the firm's town traveller for years, and the esteem in which he is held was evinced by the many expressions of goodwill conveyed to him, along with a more tangible proof in the shape of a gold albert chain. Mr Jaraea K, Paton, on beha'f of the employe?, made the presentation, wishing Mr Baxter every prosperity, and hoping that the little gift would for a long time recall oil comradeship and old associations. Mr Baxter, in acknowledging the gift, said that he would always look back with fee'inga of pleasure to the years spent in the service of Messrs M'Farlane, and that the friendships there formed would be with birn more than a name.

Patents have been applied for as fol'ows: Henry Noses, of Melbourne, for facilitating the adjustment of the sashes of railway carriage and other windows; John A. Begg, of Ashbnrton, for an improved sulky; Robert Cockerell, of Invercwgill, for an adjustable double-action lever pump-hmdle for horse or other power pumping machines; Anquctil F, Somerville, of Felson, for rebated weatberboarding; E. G. Wright, of Christchuroh, for gold-separating and saving machines; H. Oldham, of Tuakau (Auckland), for improvementßin flax maohinery; A. A. Adams, of Dunedin, for a new process for preserving animal food and fish from decomposition ; J. W, Black, of Auckland, for a new game; James Bell, of Inoh Clutha, foi improvements in michinf ry for dressing New Zealand Am fibre; H. F. Olayton and G. H. Holdroyd, of Yorkshire, for an improved method of filtering; D. R. Galbraith, of Auckland, for an invention for the Bessemer converse treatment of magnetic oxide of ironaand; H. Davies, of Petersham (New South Wales), for improvements in mechanism for se'f-acting grabs, buckets, etc.

The Ivanhoe Lodge of Druids held their utual fortnightly meeting last even'ng at tho Oddfellows' Hall, Albany street; AD. Bro. J. Davis presiding. There was a good attendance, and the proceedings were of mora than ordinary interest to the numbers. A oircular was read asking the lodge to suppoit a District Grand Lodge for the whole of New Zealand Ihe secretary was inßtruoted to reply stating the result of the lodge's past Totes Qpon the matter. In reply to a question, the R.A.I). (Bro. J. Hayme9) stated that the letter sent by the lodge to the district president in reference to a committeo being formed to investigate the Registrar's report had not been read in the chapter, and nothing had been done. On the motion of P. A. Bro. A. H. Shelton, seconded by V.&, Bro. T. 0. Stokep, sen., it was resolved to form a committeo of the lodge to consider the Registrar of Friendly Societies' report, and to report the result of their investigations. A committee of oflicers and members was then formed, and after receiving a favorable "report of the progress of the juvenile lodge, which is to be opened on Thursday week, the lodge closed in harmony. The ar.nual socia' meeting of the First Churoh Young Men's Literary Association was held in the hall of the church last evening, when there was a vary large attendance, the hall being uncomfortably crowded. After the contents of the tables had received careful attention, these were cleared, and a very interesting concert programme was rendered. The opening p : e-e in tho first part, a pianoforte duet by Misses Chißho!m and N. Mollison, and a pianoforte solo by Mrs Salmond in the second part, were both very well received. Songs were given by Misses M. Mollison, Rose, and Adams, the latter recoiving a well-deserved encore tor her singing of ' Needles and pins.' Messrs Duke and Stewart, the only gentlemen soloist*, also sang well, the former receiving an encore for his rendering of 'On the rolling wave ' Misses Ross and Crawford aan? the duet' Lift's dream is o'er, farewell,' very sweetly, for which they received an encore. Recitations by Messrs J. 0. Robs and R. O. Thomson, and a dialogue, in which Messrs J. Finlayson, W. T. Wallace, J. M. Beattie, and >. Macdonald took patt, were very well given. A quartet 'Softly fall the shade* of evening, was rendered by Misses Adams and Brown and Messrs P. Thomson and J. Armstrong, and a duet 'All's well' by Messrs Lane and Armstrong, brought one of the most pleasant entertainments the Association have had for some time to a close. During the evening the Rev. J. Gibb (who occupied the chair) delivered an oxoellent and very practical address on ' How to become a public speaker.' Mra Salmond officiated as accompanist, while the oatering by Mr E. Aldred gave every satisfaction.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1889., Evening Star, Issue 7960, 16 July 1889

Word Count
2,183

The Evening Star TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1889. Evening Star, Issue 7960, 16 July 1889

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