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The Sabbath.

An English newspaper referred some months ago to the probability that the Puritan and the Socialist would find their first meeting point in the struggle to reconquer the lost Sabbath of one day’s rest in seven in the United States, where a million and a-half of wage-workers, or one in every eight families, are deprived of their rest day largely through the inconsideratencss of the Christian public. The following Sabbath observance pledge is being extensively signed:— I AGREE; I. To observe the Sabbath as a day of rest and worship. 11. To neither purchase nor patronise Sunday newspapers, 111. To use my Influence, by word and example, against railroad and steamboat travel and excursions. IV. Not to patronise any store, barber thop, news-stand, drug stoic (except for medicine), bakery, or any other place of unnecessary woik on the Sabbath, and to use my influence to close them. V. Not to send or call for mail on the Sabbath. VI. To make the Sabbatfc work at home as light and simple as possible, that all may enjoy the privileges of the day. VII. To use my influence for legislation that will protect the Sabbath as a day of rest and worship. Over four million petitioners have asked Congress for a law prohibiting Sunday trains, etc.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890611.2.46

Bibliographic details

The Sabbath., Evening Star, Issue 7930, 11 June 1889

Word Count
216

The Sabbath. Evening Star, Issue 7930, 11 June 1889

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