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IN THE RING

By "Aeneas"

THE BIGGER THEY ARE-'

TOUGH LITTLE MEN

A FAMOUS PHRASE

Can Mickey Walker knock out Max Schmeling if the fight ever goes on? asks Robert Edgren in. the "San Francisco Chronicle." "Why, of course ho can —if Max lcls him put the punch, over. That's up to Max. So far Mas has shown a "disinclination to be knocked out. Just the same, a lot of fellows smaller than Walker in proportion have flattened the bigger men. Jim Jeffries still says the hardest punch he ever felt in his life, was one Joe Choynski hit him when he was a youngster. The punch landed on Jim's upper lip and drove it between his teeth. Joe Choynski knocked out Jack Johnson, who was afterwards heavyweight champion, and Joe weighed only 16U pounds—l6s at the most. To-daj-he would have been a legitimate middeweight. In Joe's day the middleweight limit was supposed to be 152 pounds. Bob Fitzsimmons, 156 pounds, knocked out heavyweight champion Jim Corbett, and also knocked out the heaviest fighter of that time, Ed. Dunkhorst, the Human .Freight Car, who scaled a neat 300. It was the evening of that light that Ruby Robert invented the- famous phrase: "The bigger they are the 'artier they fall." Gene Tunney was coming along fine as light-heavyweight champion when he met Harry Greb, afterward middleweight champion, and Harry swarmed all over Gene and gave him, the pasting of his life. But Gene was a real fighter. Instead of being discouraged, as soon as he could get his eyes open he began training again, practising the things ho had learned while Harry was making him look like a sucker, to put it coarsely in the ring vernacular that Gene no longer approves. He fought Greb again—a couple of times—and fully evened the score, for Greb often remarked that Tunney was the toughest man he ever fought. Few, except real old timers, know anything about Terrible Terry McGovern in these days. But what a tiger that kid was in the ring. He fought so fast few ever hit him a good punch, and he knocked them all out for years before he faded and took his tuiin on the floor. Terry fought Frank Erne, lightweight champion and cleverest that ever held the title, and he fought Joe Gans, the amazing, coloured boy from the Baltimore fish market, who was then at tho top of his form and was to become lightweight champion two years later. Terry was a little follow. He had been bantam champion and had won the featherweight title. He knocked Erne out in three rounds in July and Gans out iv two rounds in December of the same year, 1900. At that time, with his bewildering speed and terrific punch, Terrible Terry could have been knocking out middleweights— if he hadn't picked the tough ones. Bob Fitzsimmons was then around, and so were Tommy Eyan and;,,» Kid McCoy. A little man -who can fight is a mighty tough customer for a big follow who can fight. Jack Dempsey was a lot interested in Harry Greb when Greb once volunteered to act as sparring partner for a few days just to get a good workout. "He's a busy bee—he's suro one busy be© " said Dempsey. Greb got the idea that he could beat Dempsey the way he beat Tunney, and he challenged the heavyweight champion for months. At that, as Dempsey was near the top of his form, at the time, it may have been lucky for Harry that boxing authorities refused to allow the match to be put on. Dempsey didn't care much about fighting him. "Those light fellows move so fast it's hard to beat them to the punch," Dempsey said. His specialty was beating giants to tho punch. That was a comparatively easy job. ° Walker gave Jack such a tough fight that Sharkey slowed tip near the end and stayed on the defensive when he should have been putting on every bit of speed he had to save tho decision. It ivas a draw. And iii Sharkey's next fight he massacred Camera. Ike Robin Training. Ike Robin, the well-known Maori wrestler, is training steadily in an endeavour to "come-back" into the game this season. The big Maori, it is stated, has already lost a stone in weight and when he works off another couple or so Ike reckons that he will be just about ready to engage the imported talent. In the event of Robin getting into wrestling form at an early date it is likely that he will be one of the j headliners in a bout to open the Wellington association's season prior to the arrival of the American team. Pesek on the Trail. John Pesek, the back slam exponent, is not at all satisfied with tho way the wrestling game is conducted in America, and he considers there is too much close corporation between wrestlers, managers, and promoters for many of the matches to be "on the level." So much, or so little, does Pesek think of Henry De Glane, Jim Londos and Strangler Lewis, the throe claimants to the world's heavyweight title that he has challenged them all to meet him on the same night. What is more, he says that he -will get a fall out of each of them in this one night show and he is willing to bet £1000 of his own money this way. "De Glane" says Pesek, in a circular he has had printed, "who has never defeated a good wrestler in his entire career, claims the title because he bit himself in the arm and won a trick decision over old man Lewis. Londos claims the title _ because he was manipulated in a trick tournament in Philadelphia. Lewis has no claim at all to the title and has been 'washed up' for some time. He is now an old man, and is trying to keep before the public by a scries of matches with stablemates." A Valued President. General gratification will be felt by wrestling enthusiasts that Mr. H. D. Bennett has been persuaded to continue in the office ns president of the union. The value of Mr. Bennett's work hi the interests of the sport iv inestimable. During the last two years on his shoulders has fallen a great deal of the detail work in connection with the union, and such has been the vast amount of work that the office of president has been practically a full-time job. Despite his numerous other interests Mr. Bennett has given his services freely and willingly, and it is in a great measure due to his tact, patience, and foresight that wrestling is in the position it is to-day. It is to bo hoped that Mr. Bennett will long continue his association with the sport. Thomas Out. On account of having developed an abscess in his arm, Harold Thomas has been compelled *o give up his chance of meeting Val BorcovsUj at tho Mirmnar Club's tournament on Monday night. It is tho intention of the New Zoqland Council to give Thomas another opportunity of gaining his

place in the boxing team for the Olympic Games, and if permission is granted the Miramar Club intend putting on another tournament in three or four weeks' time. For next Monday night eleven bantamweights and nine featherweights have entered for the novice tournament. The star bout of the evening will now be between Borcovsky and Bob Coughlan, of Palmerston North, who is said to be a tough, rugged fighter, who will make the West Coaster move all the way. In addition, Billy Withey and Alex. Hill will mix over three rounds, and E. Reid and J. Connors are down to go the same distance. Indications are that the club will provide a first-rate night's boxing. Wrestling Union Officials. At the annual meeting of the Dominion Wrestling Union this week the following officers were elected: Patron, Sir George Richardson; president, Mr. IT. D. Bennett; vice-presidents, Messrs. Piner (Duncdin), P. R. Climio (Christchurch), J. Creeke (Wellington), G. Watchorn (Palmcrstou North), and. G. Henning (Auckland); secretary-treas-urer, Mr. G. R. Bennett; lion, solicitors, Messrs. J. D. Willis (Wellington), W. H. Ready (Auckland), and A. N.eale (Dunedin); management committee, Messrs. J. M. Connolly, T. Casserley, J. Creeke, E. Lynneberg, aud S. J. McKee.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19320227.2.163

Bibliographic details

IN THE RING, Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 49, 27 February 1932

Word Count
1,387

IN THE RING Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 49, 27 February 1932

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