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Women in Print.

TO CORRESPONDENTS. All accounts of weddings or other functions intended for this column must be legibly written in ink. Marriages and engagements must be certified by the people concerned or by responsible relatives.

A most interesting matter was mentioned at a recent meeting of the Auckland Red Cross by the Hon. O. Fowlds. the chairman.- He said that most satisfactory cures had been effected among the crippled children at King George Hospital, Rotorua. There had been a long waiting list, but so many cures had been made, and in a "comparatively short time that it would be as well for parents with crippled 'children to know that there would be opportunities for them at Rotorua. There was less ceremony and delay than formerly for the Auckland children, as they used to have to apply through Wellington, and now they could make all arrangements through their own centre. A marriage which-occasioned much interest was quietly celebrated at St. Paul's Pro-Cathedral, yesterday afternoon, when Miss Margaret Myra (Peggy) Rid-de-U, elder daughter of Mrs. V. W. Riddoll, of Wellington, and the late Mr. Riddell, of Napier, was married to Mr. Karau Simson, elder son of Mr, and Mrs. Lan Simson, of Hawkes Bay. The Yen. Archdeacon Johnson qfliciated. The bride was given away by her mother, and wore a charming costume of pale pink- georgette, hand-sewn with pearls over silver lace. Her hat was of silver lace and pink tulle, she carried a beautiful posy, of roses. Mrs. Riddell wore navy blue and a small hat to match, and Miss Betty. Riddell. was also in navy hlue, her frock being of taffetasi with a hat of the same shade.. For the first .time in the history of Wellington College a special prize has been given for elocution. It was won j by Arthur Grant, a' pupil of Mrs. MeI nard. One of the most costly, and beautiful Communion cups in the world was made some time ago for use at/ Holy Angels' Church Buffalo. The rector, the Rev. J. Quinn, asked for gifts of jewels and gold for a new chalice, and there was a remarkable response. The list of gifts included: Diamonds, 83; pearls, 145; gold bracelets, 82; gold medals, 17; gold watches, 8; gold rings (208 wedding rings),, 396; gold ornaments, 600; gold coin,- £28. Nearly all these*- precious stones and gold siave been utilised in this marvellous Communion cup. News comes from Mrs"! C. Paris (formerly Miss Gladys Davies, Garden road. Wellington) that she and her husband intend to settle down in Southampton, .England. Tha Misses Bullen (3), of Christchurch, . returned by the Tahiti from an extended overseas trip, including California. Ja.pan, and China. They are leaving for Christchurch to-night. • ' Miss Maitland leaves to-day for a, visit to America and England. * Miss N. E. s Coad is leaving for a visit to the Cold Lakes. Miss Dorothy Montgomery hna returned from an extended visit to her. brother in Fiji. Mentioned by "The Post's" London correspondent as . being in that city are Mr. and Mrs. F. Kissel. Miss M. A. Bradley, Miss F. M. Mairyatt, Mrs. S. D'Arcy Irvine, Mr. and Mra. Fred Sanders, Miss M. Chajjple, all of Wellington. A quaint idea originated by a London catering company was a. competition for the suggestion of i new name for old-fashioned slop-basin, the name of which was considered as ugly and unsuitable, and which some of the habitues of the'restaurants disliked. It appealed thafover 200 people sent in suggestions, , and the prize was given to a My. Gregory, who suggested the v/ord "binette," which was accepted as easy to remember, and quite soothing, to the feelings of those who objected to the old name. There is no reason why binettes should not become known in other cities besides London, and in the course of time, no doubt, it will become a dictionary word.

Great sympathy will be felt by a larjce circle of friends for the Misses Connop m the loss of their mother, Mrs. Louise lone Connop, who was taken ill suddenly, and passed away, in a private hospital from heart failure following on a serious operation, which was found necessary. The late Mrs. Connop was an accomplished pianist a-nd vocalist, and was well known and respected in musical dancinu circles in Wellington and throughout'the province. With her daughters, the Misses Matis and Inez Connop, she had successfully conducted a school of dancing for a number of years, and made many friends. A. Requiem Mass was celebrated at St. Joseph's Church, and the ■ funeral took place at Karori Cemetery.

Jersey cloth is the material of the' Season for the bathing dress, with ratine as a good second. One striking costume of emerald jersey cloth had the edges bound with white and a novel girdle in green and white. Hat and bathing cloak were in the same colours, the cloak being of ratine. Another bathing-dress was also in jersey cloth, raspberry in hue, and effectively bound with black. The skirt in this case was slit at the sides to give freedom of movement, and the cap of waterproof foulard was in raspberry and black. Dark blue and black relieved with white Tound the neck are almost invariably becoming, but vivid colours make a, change and stockinette suits-are now to he had in all the fashionable gay shades, such as jade-green, cobalt-blue, and yolk-of-egg yellow. Some of the newest models with skirts have the. bodjee part made with a cross-over effect in front, outlined by contrasting bands of colour. For instance, one in navy stockinette had bands of the same in yellow, 'while on a black gown wide satin braid was very effective. A novelty this year is to have bathing cloaks made of mackin- | tosh, in white or cay colours, a blue one I being trimmed with bands of white and white tassels; while a specially elaborate one in white , was painted , with mauve flowers. The caps, of course, match the cloaks. Much more comfoi-table to wear -are cloaks of cotton sponge cloth, and these "are found in the most brilliant as wall as the most becoming shades. An orange-coloured cloak with bright bluo collar and shoulder yoke, piped with tho same blue, is very striking; while another in a. beautiful shade of cerise pink would make, a charming picture on the beach. In very good style is a cloak with a deep shoulder cape made of white sponge cloth striped with black and piped with old brick-red casement cloth which also forms a tie at the neck. Quite a number of up-to-date schools for girls now include carpentry as a school subject for those who have a reasonable amount of aptitude. It is claimed that such handwork is of the greatest value iii developing the pupil both mentally and morally, states an English newspaper. , It is certain that an increasing number of girls take a real joy in doing creaifve work of this kind, though it is usually hurled at women, that with few 'exceptions they aro utterly lacking in the creative instinct and'have no interest in the problems of construction. The introduction of carpentry to tho school curriculum should do r.ioro to givo jnrla the balance they need than even their JUJOrts.

A successful Christmas fair, organised by the Kiwi Club of the Constable Street Congregational Church, was held last week in the schoolroom. On arriving at the hall Father Christmas and his fairies entered the Magic Cave,which was afterwards declared open by the Rev. H. Hutchens, of the London Missionary Society. Miss. Dora Livermore presented Mrs. Hutchens with a bouquet of irises and carnations. The cave, which was decorated by Mrs. Nettleton, was much admired. The fair was continued in the evening, when an enjoyable concert was given by Misses N. ■ Pollock, Goodwin, Bryant, Hardie, Wrigley, Holler, Nettleton, and Mr.' J. Hutchiti and G. Peek. The stalls were in charge of Mesdames Graff, Zorn, and Miss Pennington (tearooms), Miss Wilton (flowers), Miss N. Graff (sweets), Miss Nettleton (novelty). The proceeds were for the funds of the London Missionary Society. The matron of the M.N.R. Eesidential Nursery, Owen street, acknowledges with thanks gifts from Mrs. Fancourt, Mrs. Sam Kennedy, Mrs. Bennett. Karori road and Kelburn-Northland branch, Miss' Sheppard, 'Mrs. Roberts, Mra. ! Hove Gibbons, Mrs. Boden, Karori .branch, Mrs. Spear, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Gray Young, Mrs. James Findlay, Mrs. Beales, Mrs. Southee, Mrs. Taylor, and Hawkes Bay Fisheries. A prediction that women are destined to play an increasingly important part in the direction of the world's affairs was made by Dr. R. M. Beattie in the course of an address at St. Cuthbert's annual prize-giving ceremony (says the "New Zealand Herald"). Great progress had been made in the education of women along higher lines. in recent years, he said, and nothing could stop the forward movement which was now being made in all parts of the world. In mor-. al, social, and political affairs, women's influence was increasing, and a sound education was becoming more and more essential to woman's sucoess In modern life. It therefore behoved all girls to | take fullest advantage of the opportunity to secure a liberal education, so that vhen tha time came, they would be fitted to take up their chosen work. There was also need for domestic , education along lines which would prepare them for woman's highest destiny, and a necessity for the development of character and inculcation of reverence, and a teaching, of religion which would- enable theni to meet .the trials and brave the storms of life/ The following items of news are sent by " The Post's" London correspondent, writing on 10th November:—Next month Mrs. A. B. Rose will leave for New Zealand on a visit to her parents, Mr.- and Mrs. J .Kirkcaldie (welling 1ton)! She will take with her her infant ■daughter. . . . Tlie Misses M. and D. RoW (Wellington) have been a/way from London for several months visiting Wales and Scotland, and staying with relatives in various part of England. They will probably spend the winter in London with the grandmother, Mrs. H. Rose. . . . Mr. and Mrs. C. Cathie and the Misses Cathie (Wellington) have just spoilt four months in Scotland. After three weeks in London they are going e-ither to Bournemouth or Torquay for the winter. . . . Miss B. M.

Baber, M.A., is sailing by the Ruapehu on 23rd November. She has engaged two mistresses for the staff of the Marsden Collegiate School, of which she is the principal, and hopes to secure two more- before leaving. The English Child Emigration Society 'was founded in 1909 by Mr. Kingsloy Fail-bridge, who, going to England from South Africa, realised the waste of child life in the Old Country and the resulting loss to the Empire. The Fairbridge Farm School 'in Western Australia was started, and 140 children have served their apprenticeship in a happy, wholesome environment. ' Some of the young people have started on their own account; others are employed as farm labourers. The Federal Government is now contributing to the funds of the school. Regarding out-door games for girls, the report of an Australian committee is well worth careful reading by those who take an ( interest in the matter. The joint committee dn the physical education for girls reported "that suitable physical education, including games and sports, is as generally beneficial to girls aa to boys. There is, however, need for discrimination; individual girls may be unfit for particular forms of exercise, and on this account medical examination as to fitness is generally desirable. Among the particular games which the committee had under consideration, viz,, tennis, netball, lacrosse, golf, hockey, cricket, and football, only the last was considered unsuitable for girls. Of sports, swimming, rowing, cycling, and horseriding were all suitable for girls, provided that they were carried out under | suitable conditions and excess avoided. Competitive games and sports were equally permissable provided that they were ■undertaken with due regard to the fitness of the individual. Any game, or sport might become unsuitable if practised in such a way or to such a degree as to cause. undue strain or fatigue. ■There was ako a balance between mental exerction and physical fatigue which could not be altogether ignored. A girl who was working at high pressure for examinations may have to play games less strenuously. On tfcho other hand, fatigue by physical exercise was a bad preparation for mental work. Perhaps the most import-ant point, the report continues, which arose in connection with the physical education of girls was its influence in after life, if any, upon motherhood. It is difficult to obtain conclusive evidence on this point. It might be thought that the increased muscular and bone development consequent on much physical exercise might increase the' difficulties of parturition. On the other hand, the increased muscular power might serve to facilitate par- ' turitiou; and some observers had attributed a good result in this way to strenuous- physical education. On the whole it would seem that there' was no clear proof that strenuous physical education had any special influence upon the prospect of motherhood."

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Bibliographic details

Women in Print., Evening Post, Volume CC, Issue 147, 19 December 1922

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2,177

Women in Print. Evening Post, Volume CC, Issue 147, 19 December 1922

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