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MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS.

THE MAYORAI/TY. TRIANGULAR CONTEST LIKELY. It is probable that Mr J. will not hare a walk-over for the Mayoralty; I*. H. T. J. Thacker, M.P., will very likely he a. candidate. The executive of the Port Christchurch League were last evening discussing the circularising of all candidates for the Lyttelton Harbour Board and local municipal elections to asc.itain whether they were in favour of the Port Christchurch proposition or not Dr. Thacker said he had sounded Mr Dougall on the Chnstcluircl scheme, and Mr Dougall had stated that he would not support it lan so keen on this .question, added Dr. Thacker. "that it you back mo up I will fight him for the Mayoralty on it. (Applause.) I am entirely m your hands as to what we are going to do. The chairman of tho meeting (Mr J. J. Graharm suggested that they circularise candidates first, and then hold a meeting in a week's time, when they would know whether to ask Dr. Thacker to stand or not. . Subsequently tho wish was expressed by Mr C. Allison that candidates should be solected by the I<cague < that evening to contest the civic elections. The chairman said he know of several present who Were desirous of standing. Dr. Thacker said he would like to see Mr W. J. Jenkin and Mr J. B. Struthers nominated.

Finally it was decided to ascertain tho views of ail candidates in regard to the Port Christchurch scheme, and then consider these at a meeting next week, when nominations <if supporters of the scheme will be mado.

Mr Graham also gave notice to move that Dr. Thacker bo the nominee of the League for tho Mayoralty. Asked by a 'Press" reporter afterwards if this meant that the League would enter tho elections as a third party, Mr Graham said that probably stiriport would he given to members of other parties who were in favour of tho League's platform, and probably the Leasmo would also nominate candidates of its own —for example, run Dr. Thacker for the Mayoralty.

A SURPRISE. If tho Port Christchurch League decides to enter the lists as a third party it will probably be a wclcome event for the Labour Pai-ty, which realises that its only chanco of securing a majority dh the City Council is by tho splitting of votes. When a leading member of the Citizens' Association was informed by a "Press" reporter last ovening of the new situation that liad arisen, he was astounded, pointing out that Dr. Thackcr had assured Sir Dougall that he would not stand against him. This gentleman stated that probsbly as a result of Dr. Thaclter's cnango of front fresh efforts would be made to induce Mr H. Holland to re-contest the Mayoralty. CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATES. Mr It. Carter informed a "Press" reporter yesterday that ho had practically made up his mind to contest the Linwood Ward as an Independent candidate. Mr C. Allison is mentioned as a probable candidate for Sydenham, and Mr J. B. Struthers as one for Central or St. Albans. ; It is understood. that Messrs W. S. Godfrey and T. S. Dacre will be two of the Citizens' Association candidates for Linwood. It is expected that the Citizens' Association candidates will be announced to-ihorrow afternoon. Among others, representations have been made to Messrs A. F. "Wright and D. Reese to stand, tho former for Svdenham, blit both have refused nomination.

THE ROLLS. The Christchurch municipal supplementary roll closed at midnight on Tuesday. It contains 3014 names, which with the 22,528 on the main roll, makes a total of 25,542, which is 725 less than oh the previous l LABOUR CANDIDATES AT ST. ALBANS. The first shots in the municipal election campaign were fired lafct night at the Carlton bridge, when the Labour candidates for the St. Albans Ward— Mesdaiiies Ada Wells (present counPage, and the Rev. J. H. G. Chappie—addressed a crowd which varied.frohi thirty to forty persons and included a fair admixture of women. The candidates received an uninterrupted hearing, and at the cohelusiob of their remarks, though questions were asked for, none were forthcoming. The Rev. J. H. G. Chappie, the first speaker, advanced the theory that municipal councils should be the channel through which, the citizens should express their grievances and their wishes to the General Government. Democratic ideals had been thoroughly dished and betrayed by the repeal of the proportional representation system, and there was a tendency in municipal Matters to get away from the principles and ideals of democracy. One indication was the resort to contract instead of day labour. The increase in the wages of the Council's employees was due td the Labour members; if he were elected he would support a 30hour week. The electricity department should not be Used to squeeze profits out of the people; the l»enefits of cheap electricity should be available to all. There were hard times ahead, and if they voted against Labour they would be voting against their own interests and pressing their own noses tighter against the social grindstone. Hard tim6s were caused by the greed of the few. He snoke at some length, on the housing problem, and said that Labour stood for every man owning his own homev Landlords did not care if the workers lived in vulgar housed and vuigar streets; and vulgar houses and streets made vulgar people. The City Council should develop the co-operative spirit; there should be co-operative stores with the Council at the back of tliem; there should be municipal bakeries: a better system of milk delivery ; and there should be a municipal market. Mrs Wells said that it -was the cry of the children that brought her into public life: only when there was not one neglected child would they see the dawn of civilisation. The mother spirit must move from the home into municipal affairs. There should be municipal kitchens in order that mothers should have 'more time, to devote to their .children. There should be municipal laundries to dp away with "the drab,, miserable work of washing, and to make washing a beautiful and scientific thing." When she mentioned these things in the City Council she was looked upon as a sort , of curiosity that ought to be suppressed; but they were done elsewhere and could be down here. There was any amount of money wherewith to do them. As to children's playgrounds there should be attendants provided to take charge of the children ana show them how to play. Mrs Page said she believed in the Labour Party because it desired the good of the individual as against the good of property. As to the housing problem, she emphasised the assistance wom-en could give in solving it, seeing that they had to live most of their lives in the house. It wa3 necessary that the problem should be dealt with before the city grew much bigger: they were threatened with slums, and these ought not to exist where there was so much ground available. Mrs Page j advocated municipal markets and I kitchens-

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19190403.2.45

Bibliographic details

MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS., Press, Volume LV, Issue 16488, 3 April 1919

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1,179

MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS. Press, Volume LV, Issue 16488, 3 April 1919

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