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NEWS OF THE DAY.

Boabd of Education—A meeting of the board of Education will be held at the Normal School to-morrow at Hp m.

L.O.L.—The usual monthly meeting of L.OL, No 3 will be held at the Orange Hall this evening at 7.30 p.m.

Drill Classes—Aβ will be seen elsewhere, the Saturday drill classes do not meet until February 3rd.

Supkkmb Coukt. —The criminal session of tbe Supreme Ooart will open this morning, , at 10 a.m., before his Honor Mr Jaetice Johnston.

CiRCUB. — Barlow's circus opened last evening in the paddock opposite the Theatre, when there was a good attendance. The company appear again this evening.

Diobama. — Reiner's diorama of the Americau War, which, wee exhibited here some time back, will re-open on Saturday next at the Canterbury Music Hall. Mr H. Stanley is the lecturer.

Addington Cbickbt Club.—A meeting of the membere of the above ciub will be held at Feathers' Hotel tomorrow evening, to wind up the club, and dispose of the plant. A meeting will afterwards be held to form a new club. Sunday School- Union.—The annual gathering of the children in connection with the Canterbury Sunday Bcbool Dnion took place at the Durham street Wesleyan Church on Sunday afternoon. Upwards of 1500 children assembled, and an address was delivered by Rev W. Morley. The Rink.—There was a large attendance at the Kink last evening, when Mdlle. Fracsini repeated her wonderful performances on the bicycle. Mr Taylor and Lilhe went through their skating feats, and there was the usual general ekatiog, To night is the last appearance of Mdlle Franzini, when she will go through her perfoingnce blindfolded. Thbatbe Royal,—"Oar Conein German" had a very large attendance of visitors last evening at the Theatre, every part being filled. Mr Emmet's songs and dances were loudly applauded, and the other characters were also well filled. This is the last week of "FritE," Mr Emmet's other novelty, •Jan the New German," being in rehear&al. Be ward.—As will be seen elsewhere. Mr Hulbert has offered a reward of £10 for information leading to the conviction of the percon who damaged his} shop windows on the night of New Year's eve. Wβ hope that this will have the result of bringing the offender to justice, as each •> wanton act of destruction as this deserves punishment. Ltttklton Harbob Board —The polling for two members to reptteeat. the city or Christchnrch and two thVOhtttttwr of Commerce, took place yesterday. The result was that Mcc re Sawtell and Wright were returned for the city, aed Messrs P. Cunningham ard J, Anderson to represent the Chamber of Commerce. Pigeon Flying —A match for a sweepstake* for young birds under four months' old was ftawu yesterday from Dune*ndel to ChrUtchurch. Mr Paiker acted as starter, and Mr Nancarrow as judge. There were seven entries, but only four started. It was won by Mr Pottea's The Qaeck, which did the distance in 43 minutes ; Mr Douohne'e The Orphan was second, in 54 minutes ; Mr Parker's Bob Boy third, and Mr Walker's Storabixd fourth.

Waimakabibi Harbor Board—Messrs B. Moore, E. Smethnret, and E Parnbam have been already nominated for theEaiapoi district, and Messrs Isaac Wilson and T. Paehby for Eyreton. It is thought probable that Messrs J. Birch and E. G. Kerr will be nominated the members appointed by the Government. Nominations must be sent in to-day.

Sunday School Pickic—The teachers and children attending the Durham street Wesleyan Sunday school had their annual picnic yesterday at Taylor's gardens, Lincoln road. The weather was beautifully fine, and all enjoyed themselves most thoroughly. Spor s ofva ions kinds were engaged in and the children returned home shortly after s?ven p,.m., having epent a very pleasant day. '

Ihe Matjngatapu Mubdeheb—Sullivan, the Maungatapu murderer (writes the 1 glewood correspondent of the Bendi-go Advertiser), ie again about A person who was here yesterday, from Newbridge, statte that he was, before becoming aware of the character of the operator, shaved by the miscreant, who is travelling about as a barber. A constable ordered or advised Hullivan to leave, which he did immediately.

Music Hall—Messrs Kohler and Bent gave their entertainment at the Canterbury Music Hall last evening when there wee a good house. Mr Bent's changes of costume and character sketches were londly applauded and Mr Kohler's musical items also received due appreciation. Mr Wand, in addition to playing the accompaniments to the various songs, gave a solo on the violincello, and also accompanied Mr Koh'er on the tumbler onicon, and silver bell harmonicoa.

Kaiapoi Pbesbytebian Sundat-bchoou The annual treat to the scholars attending this Sunday-echool took place on New Year's Day. 7he children, numbering about 160, and accompanied by the Rev W. McGregor, the superintendent of the school, and some of the teachers, were conveyed to Mr Boss's farm on the ieland. Sports of various kinds were arranged for, and thoronghly enjoyed by the children. Their wants in all respects were carefully attended to, and after a pleasant day they returned to town.

The Defence op the Colonies.—lt is stated to as (Southland Wines) that the Home Government, in anticipation of the chaDce of a war in these perturbed times, has recently sent word to the Governor of New Zealand, in common with the Governors of other colonies, instructing them to procare the assistance of qualified engineers to report on the defence of the colonies, and also to furnish det-tiled information as to all the railroads open and main roads generally need

New Ybab's Day at Kaiapoi —At the Episcopalian and Weileyau churches midnight services were held. The custom in jears gone by for the fife and dram band to tarn oat was not persisted in. Daring yesterday the pleasure seekers either went off on (xcursion tripe to the Lyttelton regatta or formed pic nic parties to the beach. About 600 or 609 persons from the North passed on by the trains to the regatta, and abont 200 persona visited the sea beach. To the beach the road recently opened has given every facility for driving vehicles from Kaiapoi direct.

New Year's Day.—Yesterday was ooserved in Christchurch as a close holiday, and the fineness of the weather drew forth crowds of people bent on holiday making. Of coarse the greater part of them went to Lyttelton to the regatta. The railway arrangements were perfect, and owing to the ranning of the two lines the very large number of persons going through were carried without the Usual crowding and hustling. Many formed pic nic parties to the various spots in and around Christchurch, New Brighton and Sumner being largely patronised. In the evening the various places of amusement were well attended.

Kumara Water Supply —Aβ considerable impatience is felt by the min< re aud business men of Kamara to obtain a speedy water supply (says the Wett Coast Times), the General Government has undertaken the immediate survey of the extension or the Waimea race to Kamara. The work was commenced last week by Messrs Martin (chief). Patereoa, Frew, Turner, and Brentnail, surveyors, each with a staff of men ; it is being continued daring the holidays, and is expected to be completed ia three or four weeks. All the haude employed at the head works, Kawhaka Greek, have been knocked off for the holidays until the commencement of the New Tear, and then it is not improbable that some important changes in the scheme for obtaining additional water supply may be initiated. A portion of the Waimea race broke away during th 3 heavy rain of Friday last, the embankment having given way near the Christcharch road, but the damage will only require the labor of three for a day or two to repair.

Suicidk. —A man named John Wooding, fo merly of Orari and Alford Forest, committed suicide last evening. It appears that the deceased, who had been drinking very heavily for some time, came to town from tbe Orari on Thursday last, and stopped at the house of his brother-in-law, Mr Irvine, cf Hereford street east. About eight o'clock last evening he went into the garden, where eh jrtly after he was found with his throat cut and a carving knife beside him. Dr Prins was sent for immediate'y, and, after attending to him, ordered his removal to the hospital, where he was taken under care of the police. He was, however, f >nnd dead on arriving there. An inquest will be held. Fire at Timabtj —The Herald the following par iculars of the fire at Timaru on Saturday morning :—" Early on Saturday moroing a building which, owing to its age and dila idation, had long ceased to be an ornament to tbe place, was destroyed by fire. The building was situated just to the rear of Mr Evan's grain store, on the west side of tbe Great South road, and it was in the hands of the Curator of Intestate Estates, having belonged to the late. Dr Levy, who was drowned in tbe City of Dnnedin some years ago. It had bees let to Mr Geo Cliff but at the time of the fire it was occupied by two families —that of Mr Syverson, a photographer, and that of Mr Christmas, a man in tbe employ of Mr Evans. It seems that Mrs Syverson was an invalid, and that while in bed, a little after 1 a.m., her lamp, which she kept burning in her room, buret, the kerosene setting fire to the room. Her hueband being away at the time she called to Mr Christmas, who extinguished all the fire he could eeeTand took Mrs Syverson ioto his portion of the house for the remainder of the night. About an hour after these events Mrs Syvereon again fgave the alarm of fire, and it was theu seen that her portion of the house was in dimes. All the inmates, comprising Mr Christmas, his wife and two children, Mrs Svverson and her child, were got out of the house, bnt very little of the furniture was saved. As soon aa the flames were perceptible Constable tSullivan gave the alarm at the Brigade station, and the brigade, under Captain Wiidie, mustered promptly. The engine was taken to the tank at the corner of tbe Ship Hotel, but when the hose was run oat it was found that the tank was empty. The engine was then run to a email tank at the back <>fth j burning building, bnt the supply was very soon exhausted ; lu.:kily the building was a considerable distance from any others, and there was no wind at the time, or the want of water might huve proved a very seriooa matter. Somebody is to blame on account of the empty state of the tank at the Ship Hotel, and it will be the duty of the Borongh Council to inqui>e strictly into the matter. It is said that a leak in the tank accou-ite for its empty state, while some cay that the water has been use>i by the contractors for the additions to the bhip Hot I. It rests with the Borough Council to find out the cause of its emptinets, and to see that, it is replenished as soon as possible. A large number of people' assembled at the fir*, and several rendered the brigade valuable assistance. The buret ing of the lamp must have been the of the fire. Mr Chrieimae. however, ft it con»i*.c d ftbat he ex'inguiehed all tbe fire after this accident. Th<> building was uut insured, but there was £50 on Mr Syvereon's furniture in the Liverpool, London and Globe Office,"

LO.O.F,M.U.—The aoniTOiwj of the Loyal City of Chrietchurch lodge was celebrated last evening by a soiree and entertainment in the Oddfellows' Hall. A capital tea was provided, which was well patronised, after which the entertainment commenced. The chair was occupied by Mr W. Rollestou, M.H.B, who briefly spoke on the advantages and aims of societies such as the Oddfellows and other kindred associations, and the good effected by them amongst the working classes. The various songs, recitations, &c, on a very good programme were gone through most successfully, Mr Bchwartz presiding at the piano, and the proceedings terminated with a social quadrille party which seemed to he highly enjoyed by all.

Thb Otaqo Convention.—As enquiries are sometimes made in reference to the doings of the Council of the Otago Convention, we (Clutha Leader) believe that we are right in saying that the business committed to them has been prosecuted with all possible despatch, and ie likely shortly to be brought to a satisfactory termination. The matter stands thus—Sir Macandrew has for some time past been ready to start on hie home mission, but delay has arisen through Sir George Grey being laid up by indisposition at Kawau. A telegram was received from him on Wednesday tr at he was quite prepared to etart, and will be in Auckland in a few days to make final arrangements.

The West Coast Boad.—The recent bad weather has again played rad havoc with the Chrietchurch road, cays the Grey JRicer Argus. It is stated that on the last joaraey o! Cassidy's mail coach the crossings of the rivers on the road were found all washed away, and men were working all day on Sunday and Monday to repair them. Mr Oaseidy reports that a chain of the road at the Otira Gorge has gone clean away, and that be was compelled to drive for two chains over immense boulders down the river bed. On the west side of the accommodation house, the Otira divided into two streams, completely covered the road, broke it up, and left it ultimately impeded with trees and hnge boulders, Mr Cassidy and his fourteen passengers had by no means a pleasant trip of it.

Fobksts of Victoria.—A. contemporary gives the followiug summary of reports on tbe denuded forests in the Ballarat, Oastlemaine, and Sandhurst districts, which have been presented to the Victorian Parliament: —" The document shows that the areas on which it is proposed to carry out worke of conservation are for the. respective districts mentioned as follow :—Ballarat, 13,2*0 acres; Maryborough, 7000 acres; Caetlemaine, 7700 acres; and Sandhurst, 15,000 acres. The total cost of supervision, including fencing materials, is estimated at £2625. The total revenue obtained from these forests during the six months ending 30th June, 1876, was JE43O, while the total revenue estimated to be received per annum under the new syatem is stated at £2297 155."

The Kuma.ha.—• A correspondent signing himeelt " Abingdon Harry" writes to the Timaru Herald, from the Kumara, on Dec 25th, as followf:—"Some few months back I noticed an article in your paper respecting the West Coast rush (the Kumara). At that time I thought little of it, but since then the facts you put forth have come so true that other parties who came at the same time as myself have noticed it. I have seen more poverty at this place than I ever saw in England. The business I follow here (hawking goods from tent to tent) showsbut too plainly where poverty exists. Yet in the midst of poverty you go to tents and hots where yon see persons rolling in luxury. The most of these latter are from Canterbury and Otago, who are simply hanging on, but not sinking. I have met with a few shipmates, who came here on the first break out of the rush, and they are in a penniless position. Some of them came from Sydney, and they say they would like to have a look at Canterbury, but their pockets are too low to take them. Again, I have met with a few who have done first class since they came, but they are like plum* in a charity puddin?, few and very far apart. The very best claims here are nothing but wages, and it will take their possessors a long time to make their pilp. I believe a good few of them will get disgusted with it before their fortunes are made and clear ont. Canterbury with all its faults, I love still, and , should I ever come back, 1 will not leave again in a hnrry. I would rather be there on half a living, than on a whole one here Aβ regards climate it is something fearful here, there has not been one dry week these two months. At my t mc of writing it is raining in torrents, and when dry weather sets in, you are worried with an insect called the Taipo—as big as the beetle. Bat to conclude. To those who think of coming, I say don't start without you have got about fifty notes on you, in case of mishaps in sinking dnffere, which are as plentiful as blackberries on tbe hedges at home. If you come, don't do as some of my mate* did when' they came, vis, spend one day at the diggings and then clear out If yon come, see it out, and take your chance the same as I have done myself; and though at present the prospects do not look bright, yet, in time all things might yet come light. For myself I can't complain. I have made a living ever since I came, but in a calling many woald not like, and before I give it best, and show the white feather by returning, I will see a little of hardship. My gold finding in* leisnre time of about six weeks' fossicking is about enough to make a finger ring."

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XXVII, Issue 3583, 2 January 1877

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2,918

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XXVII, Issue 3583, 2 January 1877

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