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CITY COUNCIL.

MONDAY. FEBSUAEY 10. The usual weekiv meeting was held in the ttnnncil Chamber. Present—His Worship the Major, and Crs Hart, Ick, Raphael, Gapes, Jones and Calvert. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. Cr Jones apologised for the absence of Cr Farr that evening through illness. The town clerk reported receipts for the ™«-pV to be as follows:—From rate collector, recount G. C. rate?, 1874, £69 16s ; WaimaLriri ditto, £11 12s 8d; balance of quarter's Tent from Post office ' £l 5a : fines from R- M ' Court £7 10s ; carriers' licenses, £4 10s ; kerosene ditto, £3 ; asphalting Market place £3 6s-rent from market place, 7s. Total weeints. £107 6s Bd. Overdraft at bank on numeral account, £1223 3s 7d ; drainage account cr, £7831 0s lid ; drainage rate account, cr, £1596 3s ; wages, &c, to be paid of general account, £256 18s lOd; on drainage account, £217 lis 3d. Cr Jones referred to the large amount now being paid in wages—about three times more than twelve months' ago—and he thought that if a lot of the work was dine by contract, it would save the surveyor a great deal of time in looking through the contracts, and the work would be more satisfactorily done. He instanced the work of a tank to which he had referred, that would only'have taken a man a short while to do. and had no doubt been unattended to through the multifarious duties the surveyor had to attend to. ♦•■-#♦!, The Mayor said that one portion of the amount passed that evening was for work done on the North town belt, which was then completed, and the Council would now be able to do their ordinary work with their own men. He would have something more to say on the subject of labor in the course of the evening. The remainder of the accounts were then The Mayor here said that general complaints had been made to him that small works passed on a Monday evening remained undone for. at times more than a week. He had made enquiries, and learnt that the works committee instructed the surveyor, who instructed bis foreman, and he should like to know why this delay was occasioned. He had noticed the tank in High street that day, and saw that it was in a shameful state. He had spoken himself of the state of the fence in Latimer square, but no attention had been paid to this. A veterinary surgeon had informed him that the horse complained of as being broken-winded was made sa through being fed improperly. If the present state of things were allowed to continue it would only bring the Council into disrepute. He would like the works committee to investigate these complaints, and would be glad to give tbeni every assistance. With reference to the cab cases, he had been present in the court when the charge against Gqodyer was beard. The case was very ably conducted by Dx Foster, and a fine was "inflicted. The other charge against tbe same person Had been withdrawn. With reference to Jl'Taggart, the cabmen had repudiated ariy * connection with his conduct, and taking into consideration other matters relating to this man, and as it would not try the, merits, of the case between tbe Council "aricfihe cabmen, it was, with the advice of some councillors and Dr Foster thought to be the better plan on the whole to withdraw the charge. About twenty summonses had been taken out against the cabmen for obstructing the thoroughfare, and thepolicebad about twenty more in hand, and some of these cases and the cases adjourned last week would be heard on next Thursday. Crick-as a member of the woiks committee, acknowledged that some of the works ordered bad not been carried out as expeditiously as they should have been, but this was not the fault of the works committee, as on several occasions they, after consulting with the surveyor, called in the foreman of the works and impressed upon him the necessity of carrying out these works quickly. The surveyor could not be blamed, as he, \ besides having a great deal of work on hand, j had bad a considerable quantity of back I work to make up. He (Cr Ick) was aware -that tbe tanks were in bad order and required attention, and their present stare fully justified the remarks made that night. The surTerorhad been spoken to of this, and he should like to have him called in. With regard to what had been said about the horses, tha works committee had taken upon themselves to call in Mr Hill, veterinary surgeon, who reported the one complained of to be broken winded through improper feeding. Instructions had been given to turn this horse out, and he was now recovering. From enquiries made by the works committee they fearnt the horses were not sufficiently fed. and they had instructed the allowance of feed to be increased to two bushels. He would like again to say, before sitting down, that the •Rrfveyor might be called in The Mayor said that perhaps it would be ss well for the works committee to make mquiries into these matters. If the Council desired themselves to investigate them, that would then be the proper time to call in the surveyor. * - Cr Gapes was glad the matter had been taken up by the Council, as he had threaded to tender his resignation as a member <4 the works committee through tbe laxity atspiayedin carrying oat the instructions of taat committee. On the motion of Cr Calvert the surveyor *m called in. In reply to the Mayor the surveyor said he transferred the orders to the foreman J? J£S»* I* was his fault if they were not ««n«i out. The foreman had complained watte had not sufficient men to carry out «* works ordered to be done. He (the yyor) did not overtax the foreman, and small works to him, and which he waadered he should be aUe to look after. ««Dian had ten men under him. moved—'• That a committee be Vh*£zP kqaire into the method in which we works ordered by the Council are carried ihl' S**W«Mnit*ee to consist of his Worship it sayop'5 ayop ' Cre Hart » J o Q es. Calvert, and •Sp^ Yer, »' Withpower to call for P 6lBOllB Calvert seconded the motion, which agreed to. a &L RsphlMsl Qe sired at that stage to make rv,ml rem " k8 on cab case. It was the *»Pic throughout the town, and he three councillors taking -£22* Qtttside the Council. He also ob'da\*w ***- remarks as appearing in that .^; B fi f BE S8 stating that the action taken oftlf ■ B caomen w as with the knowledge i i» as they as forming the Council nothing whatever about it. Dr Foster bet n? „ tbat be did not advise councillors ;„A ~ e Vouncil, yet he had done so in this tWw?' The Pbess bad told them that cidM f not fit to sit as councillors if they "0 OOtcarry out tbeir own bye-laws. [The 3*^T^. at ' 8 only one man's opinion.] was P la ced in a most humiliatto tta^u. 011 * ana wonl d- he believed, be glad W*l e 'pendant in the case the 20s to iuL»^?" :off -" He objected to Dr Foster m aamu o f. &« City Council *»tbe

:>f case, as he bad not been authorished by tl it Couucil to act as he had done, but by tl [r Mayor and individual councillors. re The Mayor said what had been done was t *-■- the authority of and under a resolution of th *j fc Council, and the tactics that had been n '. sorted to were under his direction and by tt d consent of the Council, acting with the advk is of their solicitor, and until he knew wheth- --* Cr Raphael was taking his present course i B » the interests of the cabmen or those of tt '• ratepayers, he should decline to take his (t c Raphael's advice outside the Council Chan c here. He must say from what he had see c in Court wben the case was being heard ths • all Cr Raphael's sympathies lay with the cat s men, and he regretted to see this. " Cr Raphael said he was acting in the it terests of the ratepayers. 3 Cr Jones would inform Cr Raphael tha j the action taken had been under a resolu 8 tion passed by the majority of the Council. The subject then dropped. The city surveyor reported—■ "1. Mr Brightmore, the contractor fo . the Lichfi-sld street water supply, has agaii made application to be released fr®m hi contract. His letter will be laid befor you. "2. I am having a double action pamj 4 made, which 1 think will be powerfu ; enough to overcome the water on the above ' work. ' "3. The asphalte footpath on the westerr side of the approach to Victoria bridge wil be laid this week. " 4. The work for widening Victoria bridge was commenced this morning." On No. 1 paragraph being discussed, nrj the motion of Cr Ick, Mr Brightmore wat released from his contract. The other paragraphs of the report were approved. Four tenders for carting stone were opened, aud one accepted Cr Ick entered a protest against the acceptance of this tender, on the ground of its being informal, and contrary to a resolution on the books of the Council. One tender for timber was opened, and referred to the works committee. A letter was read from D. Brightmore, giving notice of his wish to withdraw from the Lichfield street water supply contract, a« he had met with unforeseen difficulties, and had not sufficient means to ca*ry it out. This letter was settled earlier in the evening, and Brightmore allowed to withdraw from his contract. A letter was read from the Heathcote Road Board, requesting the Council to be good enough to remove all obstructions—as per agreement—interfering with the Board's having the full benefit of the use of the storm water drain. Cr Ick said the surveyor had had instructions to remove the obstructions complained of the very day after the Council had authorised this to be done. Ultimately the letter was referred to the surveyor. The conditions arrived at at a public meeting nnder which the three German bells would be handed over to the city, were read as follow:— " Ist. That the members of the German Church be asked to give a lease of the ground on which the bell tower stands to the Christchurch City Council for a term of fifty years, at a nominal rental of say 5a per annum, •■2ud. That the management of the three bells already hung in the tower, and the balance of the peal (viz, five more bells to be subscribed for) shalt be vested in a committee of eight gentlemeu, five to be nominated by the City Council, and three by the trustees of the German Church, the Mayor of Christchurch to be chairman. "3rd. That the five bells now proposed to be subscribed for shall be vested in the Corporation of Christchurch, to remain the property of the city for ever. "4th. That the five bells shall on arrival be hung in the German bell tower, to be rung with the other three, as the committee of management may provide ior. " sth. That the peal when complete shall be called the Chriotcburch Bells. "6th. Should the City Council decide at any future period to remove the peal to another tower, the written consent of the trustees of the German Church (for the time being) must be first obtained before removing the three bells belonging to the Germau congregation—viz, the Kaiser, the Kron Prinz, aud Bismarck. " 7th. That the peal of bells shall be considered to be unconnected with any religious denomination whatsoever, but that the committee of management shall be requested to make arrangements to have them rung at suitable hours for Divine services on Sundays. "Bth. That the Christchurch City Council be invited to give their assent to the foregoing suggestions." Cr Raphael thought this was a religious question, and not within the province of the Council. Cr Ick considered it was really a most liberal offer from their German friends, who had shown them a most worthy example. He sincerely hoped the Council would see their way to assent to the conditions. This matter had been carefully considered by some members of the Council and some citizens, and Mr Ruddenklau had assured him that he could get five bells cast, to work in unison with the three already here. The rent asked was only a nominal one, and by the proposed means the city would be placed in the position of having a nice peal of bells. All denominations were represented, and the difficulty about obtaining subscriptions for a definite purpose was cleared away. He would move—" That this Council have much pleasure in assenting to the resolutions passed at a meeting convened at the City Council chambers respecting a peal of bells for Christchurch." Cr Jones seconded the motion with very great pleasure. The overtures made were most liberal, and large subscriptions bad been promised for the purpose of obtaining a peal. The Mayor said that in addition to very large subscriptions promised by several gentlemen, Mr John Anderson had told Lim that not only would he subscribe handsomely, but while in Germany he would do all in his power toward the object of securing a complete peal of bells for the city, f Applause.] The resolution was put and carried. The Mayor informed the Council that two gentlemen had been duly nominated as auditors for ths ensuing year, and would be declared elected on the Ist of March next, under clause 87 of the Municipal Corporations Act, 1867. There had been no nominations made for the office of assessors, and he would I herefore, under the powers of clause 126of»the Municipal Corporations Act, 18G7* j appoint Messrs M. B. Hart and E. B. Bishop, both of whom would, he believed, act. A letter was read from his Honor the Superintendent to the chairman of the sanitary committee, acknowledging receipt of letter of sth instant, reporting a case of measles in Christchurch; and in reply stating that the letter was not accompanied by any evidence or remarks such as were required by the clause of the Public Health Act. As soon as this was done, he would bring it under the notice of the Board of Health, who would no doubt, transmit it to the Colonial Secretary, as required by the Act. Cr Jones said that the child who was unwell had recoveied ; but he he had been informed by the father that another of his i children was laid up with the same complaint. If it were found necessary, during i the week the sanitary committee would re- ! port on the case. The rate collector reported that he had been engaged during the week obtaining information required for the compilation of the new rate roll. He hoped to be able to complete the roll in a- few days. He had taken out a few summonses for rates in arrears. Cr Raphael considered this report most unsatisfactory, and thought that the collector was not acting in accordance with the resolution of the Council in getting in the rates. Crs Ick, Joneg, and Gapes, expressed dissatisfaction at the action of the collector in not strictly carrying oat the resolution of tbe Council. Ultimately this was referred to the Mayor, to report at eejt tueutiug.

c The U3tial weekly report of the inspector c of nuisances was read and approved. Cr Raphael said that the liuance committee -r had considered the question of finding the » money for building a new bridge at Montreal street, at the **ite of the present one. aud they c found that however much they desired to B prevent the inhabitants from being iocour venienced, tbey could not see what quarter j the money w;ts to come fr*ra, and could -. not recommend its construction to the r Council. The Mayor said that in a few words they , could not find the mou- y for the work. I Cr Ick was afraid that not only this but many other works throughout the city would have to be stopped. At th*-* endnf the financial year there would be a d> licit of £~>M<) or £6000, and he felt that this state of things ought to be made public. If the Council -• did not receive assistance, the probability was that all the works of the city would have to be stopped at the end of five or six months. The Press pointed out certain works which it wa9 considered should be carried out, but they were expected, like the Israelites of old, to make bricks without straw. The Mayor observed that on a late occasion, when in tbe company of some members of the Government and Provincial Council, he had taken the opportunity of advertising the poverty of the Council, and he really felt afraid that unless the City Council received a grant of money, they would have to stop all the works of the city in May next. Cr Ick referred to the dangerous practice existing of people driving quickly around corners, and asked if any action had been taken under the bye-law brought forward Borne months since by Cr Lane. The Mayor replied that there had not been any, and this matter would no doubt be conI sidered at a future date. Omnibus licenses were applied for by James Hogg, Tuara street, Edward Samuels, aud William Hay ward, St Albans. A favorable report was sent in by the inspector, and the licenses were granted. Drivers' licenses were granted to Edward Samuels and William Hayward. Andrew McTaggart applied for a license for a four-wheeled cab and driver's license. Appeuded to the application was a letter from the inspector of police in reply, forwarding a list of offences for which that applicant had been before the Bench at the Resident Magistrates' Court. I Cr Raphael had made enquiries of the police respecting the character of the applicant, and could learn nothing against him. If he knew anything he would say so then. He would move that the motion be granted. Cr Gapes felt that this would open up the whole question, as if they granted a man a license, they would have to find him a stand, and if any of the other cabmen went on that stand they would have to be summoned. He knew that the license of this man had been cancelled on one occasion for six months, but had again been granted to him, and as hehad since behaved himself, he would second th« resolution. The Mayor observed that the application for the driver's license was informal, as it had not been signed by the inspector. Cr Jones would oppose the resolution. He (Cr Jones) was there to do his duty fearlessly, and from the character (from the report of the inspector of police) of this man, and the way he had acted he did not think he was a fit person to hold a license- The license had not been signed by the inspector, ' and he would move as an amendment - " That the license be not granted." Cr Ick would second the amendment— ' firstly, because the application was informal; , and secondly, because, from the conduct of ' this man in cutting himself out of the enclosure after being warned, and deliberately going to another stand aud maliciously cutting do-vn a post, he certainly was not, in ■ his opiniou, a fit man to hold a license. Cr Hart could not see what use it was for them to place resolutions on their books if i they were not to be guided by them. There t was one resolution in existence distinctly i laying down the rule, that all applications for licenses should be sent in a week before 1 being considered in Council. 1 By leave of the Council, further consideration of Cr Raphael's resolution was adjourned until Monday next. < The notice of motion standing in Cr Farr's t name was allowed to stand over for a week. The meeting then adjourned. 1

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP18750216.2.17

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CITY COUNCIL., Press, Volume XXIII, Issue 2961, 16 February 1875

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3,380

CITY COUNCIL. Press, Volume XXIII, Issue 2961, 16 February 1875

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