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ASTOUNDING MASQUERADE

WOMAN'S LIFE AS tyAH

RECENT "MARRIAGE" TO YOUNG GIRL

To have lived, worked and "A^o'worid^d'"to 10 years, to have been accepted as a man by tn nff g j r i have recently undergone a form of marriagewith a rows g and then to have her real sex exposed undei questioning:, the experience of a 30-year-old w°ma , (antast j c with two reporters m her city flat g > ei-vanffest in story of masquerade which must rank among the stiangest the annals of human behaviour. Tall, robust and sturdily built, with a mop f j hair and virile manly mien, she looked, talked and comp herself as a m'an, and it was difficult to believe ' When told that the incredible facts of lecent I hist y well authenticated and known to the quickly dissolved, and she frankly admitted she had _ chang cl ner sex.

The woman and her "wife" are both employed in the same city factory and are regarded as man and wile. The extraordinary facts surround-, part ashman ing the case first emerged when the not?" he . queried. "I "was Registrar-General in Wellington dis-l ag stron g an d able to fight as any covered that the name on a marriage man." certificate issued at the registrar's He was disappointed when office in July last was the same name he was as that of a person who was rejected tliat j, c f ore the routine medical from military service in 1940 when a examination, his mother, realising medical examination revealed that that he might somehow be passed "he" was a "well nourished woman" his . real of about 27. which he underwent a private Police inquiries were begun, and . exam jnation by army doctors, who on Monday afternoon detectives confirmed his mother's story.

interviewed the parties. The masqueradcr (described hereafter as "Mr. X" or by the male pronoun) unblushingly admitted his Identity and true sex and that he went through a form of marriage with a single girl of 18 at the registrar's office. The girl signed the application for the marriage certificate, while "Mr. X' de- 1 scribed himself as a labourer. The only two witnesses of the marriage were the mothers of the parties, only one of whom, that of "Mr. X," was aware of the husband's actual sex.

Broad Shouldered and Husky

In an attempt to obtain confirmation of the unusual circumstances the reporters called at an oldfashioned apartment house in the city last evening where the couple reside as man and wife. The door was opened by a young woman. The visitors asked for "Mr. X" and a broad shouldered, husky looking individual wearing an open shirt and grey slacks came forward. On the reporters disclosing their identity and the purpose of their visit, to obtain a personal explanation of his history and unorthodox status, he invited them into a back bedroom without the' slightest hesitation.

It was a typical bachelor's room, containing a single bed. above which was a bookcase and several photographs, obviously of 'Mr. X," one showing him with a pipe. These phctographs could be mistaken for those of a glamorous Hollywood male film star. On a dressing table stood a pot of hair cream and other male toilet accessories. Male clothing was lying about and on a shelf reposed a copy of "Esquire." Tattoo on Arm Producing a packet of cigarettes and inviting his guests to be seated, "Mr. X," without a trace of nervousness, stoou through a long interview, usually with brawny arms (one of them tattooed) folded. He answered questions frankly and fearlessly. At first there was an obvious reluctance to discuss the matter, not. he said, so much because of fear of any personal consequences. but because he had no wish fo involve his wife and relatives in anything which might be misunderstood by the public. After some time he admitted that detectives had been questioning him and he had been told of the possibility of Court proceedings, although he hoped they would not involve disclosure of* his name and probably loss of his position.

Keenly Disappointed "I was keenly disappointed that I did not get away," he went on. "I even asked one of the doctors whether 1 could serve as an ambulance driver, but I was given no chance." Answering questions concerning his early life he said he was born in North Auckland but when lie was young the family moved to Auckland where he had lived ever since. Since his adoption of the life of a male he had become proficient in several manly sports, including swimming, rowing, tennis and boxing. He had won his three-mile swimming certificate. In recent years he had attempted to join a rowing club and would have done so bad enough skifrs b°?n available. "Those are my pals," he said, pointing to a photograph of a group of boxers hanging on the wall.

Capable in a Rou.uh and Tumble

"Sure, I can hold my own in a rough and tumble," he said, referring to a number of pugilistic encounters with men. "I was able to stand up for myself in any rows." He said he and his young "wife," were very happy together. They often went to dances and movies together and worked in the same firm. Here they were known as man and wife. No one had an inkling of the truth. He agreed that their relationship was unusual, although to him, acting and feeling like a male, it seemed perfectly natural. He was happy, his "wife" was happy, and they were not doing harm to anyone. Why couldn't they be left like that? "My reactions to other men? Normal, just as yours would be." He agreed that many people would hold up their hands in horror and express surprise and disgust at such an unusual alliance, but he was not concerned with other people's feelings. It was no business of theirs. A salient impression gained in conversation with this modern Amazon was his belief that there was nr ?lJ] n "Y= illegal in the relationship with the young girl. To some people, he conceded, such a liaison might

"You fellows are .just after a story. I know it'll be a good scoop for you; you want to tell the world, but after all I have my job to consider. I've worked hard en ouch to keep it and I want to stay in my job. Why should I tell you jokers all you want to know. As soon as this comes out, I suppose I'll have to leave the town." Answered Questions When assured that his interviewers had no intention of disclos ing his identity or of intentionally betraying any facts which would It ' to identify him, he spoke more freely of his past. He conceded that his callers were already in possession of indisputable evidence of his real sex and from then onwards he became less reserved and answered questions touching-on his early life and the motives impelling him to make his strange decision to abandon the life of a woman.

It was, he said, during the depression years, or about the late 'thirties, that he realised his life as a girl was beset with difficulties. He had a natural inclination to masculine pursuits and that, coupled with his physical appearance, had reacted detrimentally.

"I lost two jobs because I was perfectly natural, that is because I was more like a man than a woman. I felt my position keenly and at length realised that the simplest way out was to become a man. Other girls at these two jobs accused me of being a boy masquerading as a girl. I was really driven from both these jobs. I couldn't obtain a bite to eat the way I was—that's why I decided to become a man." "Only Way to Hold Job" "Were you shunned by other girls?" he was asked. "No. I wasn't shunned, but things were just difficult, and haven't I been justified in deciding that the only way to hold a job was by being a man? I've held the job I'm in for over two years and mixed freely with hundreds of men and nobody regards me as anything but ■ man. I've held my own with these men. I am endowed with a masculine physique that has helped me out." Reflecting a moment, he added: 'Now. if this comes out, I suppose it means the end of everything." Xot long after the war sta-ted lie was called in a ballot and

appear to be abnormal—he agreed it was unusual —but to him and to his partner it was natural and normal. Moreover, before they were "married" the girl was aware of his actual sex and it was definitely her idea that they should live together.

Something seemed to dawn on him at this stage. He stepped back, clapped his hands and sighed: "My, what a lot we let ourselves in for by marriape! I hope my 'wife' is not dragged into this." He admitted- that the idea of marriage was not his. They met at work and a strong attachment sprang up between them. "Her brother was a great cobber of mine." he said. "I have plenty of good robbers. Th->v are good 'jokers' and I would hate""to lose their friendship."

There Was Xo Honeymoon

Asked where they went for their honeymoon, he said there was no honeymoon. They both went to his mother's home for dinner and returned to work the next morning.

Through the interview Mr. X preserved perfect composure. He— it seemed odd to think of him as a woman—seemed concerned mainly about two things—a desire to retain his employment and a desire not to injure in any way the young girl with whom he was living.

To the interviewers he was any young man about town, except that his powerful physique and fine bearing gave the impression • he would bo a tough customer to fall out with. There was nothing feminine about him with these exceptions—a beautiful skin, of fine texture, and warm colouring, and a tell-tale broadening, of the hips.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19450926.2.79

Bibliographic details

ASTOUNDING MASQUERADE, Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 228, 26 September 1945

Word Count
1,683

ASTOUNDING MASQUERADE Auckland Star, Volume LXXVI, Issue 228, 26 September 1945

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